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2004 Incline Club Race Reports

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View 2005 race reports

Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon, Aug 21-22, 2004 - 39 reports
Leadville Trail 100 Mile Race Across the Sky - Leadville, CO - August 21-22, 2004 - 6 reports
Olympic Games - Athens, Greece - August 21, 2004
Britt Hobo Days - Britt, Iowa - August 14, 2004
Bridger Ridge Run - Bozeman, Montana - August 14, 2004
La Luz - New Mexico - August 1, 2004
Barr Trail Mountain Race - Barr Trail / Pikes Peak / Manitou Springs, Colorado - July 18, 2004 - 7 reports
Tinqui 10K - Tinqui, Peru - July 23, 2004
5430 Half-Ironman Triathlon - Boulder, CO - July 18, 2004
Garnet Mountain Challenge - near Big Sky, Montana - July 17, 2004
Burnco Calgary Marathon - Calgary, Alberta, Canada - July 11, 2004
Midnight Madness - Ames, Iowa - July 10, 2004
Camp As Sayliyah Independence Day 5/10K - Camp As Sayliyah, Doha, Qatar - 7/4/2004
3rd Annual Otter House 5K - Castine, Maine - July 4, 2004
Mt. Marathon Race - Seward, Alaska - July 4, 2004
Vail Hill Climb - Vail, CO - Sunday, July 4, 2004 - 4 reports
Leadville Trail Marathon - Leadville, CO - July 3, 2004 - 4 reports
Tour du Lac (Around the Lake) - Bucksport, Maine - June 26, 2004
Double Dipsea - Stinson Beach, CA - June 26, 2004
Estes Park Half Marathon - Estes Park - June 20, 2004
West Highland Way - Scotland - June 19, 2004
Bighorn 50 Mile Trail Run - Bighorn Mountains WY - June 19, 2004 - 2 reports
Bighorn 50K - Dayton, Wyoming - June 19, 2004
San Juan Solstice 50 - Lake City, CO - June 19, 2004 - 5 reports
Mount Washington Road Race - Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire - June 19, 2004
29th Hampden 8 1/2 mile Road Race - Hampden, Maine - Sunday June 13, 2004
Holcomb Valley 33 Mile Trail Run - Big Bear CA - June 13, 2004
Casper Marathon - Casper, WY - June 6, 2004
Steamboat Springs 1/2 Marathon - Steamboat Springs - June 6, 2004
Squaw Peak 50 mile Trail Run - Wasatch mountains outside of Orem, UT - June 5, 2004
Hospital Hill Half Marathon - Kansas City, Missouri - June 5, 2004 - 2 reports
Newport Marathon - Newport, Oregon - June 5, 2004
Camp As Sayliyah Patriot Run - Camp As Sayliyah, Doha, Qatar - May 31, 2004
Rocky Mtn double marathon - Laramie, WY - May 30, 2004
Rye by the Sea - Rye, NH - May 29, 2004 - 2 reports
Stu Nevermann Memorial Run XV - Mason City, Iowa - May 29, 2004
Superior Trail 25 and 50K Races - Lutsen, Minnesota - May 22, 2004
Bay to Breakers - San Francisco, CA - May 16, 2004
24 hours of Boulder — relay - Boulder Reservoir - May 15-16, 2004
FTC Old Town Marathon - FTC, CO - May 9, 2004
Pilot Knob Trail Race - Forest City, Iowa / Pilot Knob State Park - May 8, 2004
Na Holo Wahine - Maui, Hawaii - May 8, 2004
South Miami Beach Race - South Miami Beach - May 3, 2004
Adidas Vancouver International Marathon - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada - May 2, 2004
Lincoln Marathon - Lincoln, NE - May 2, 2004
Collegiate Peaks Trail Run - Buena Vista, CO - May 1, 2004 - 2 reports
Whiskey Row Marathon - Prescott, AZ - May 1, 2004
Wild Wild West Marathon and 50km - Lone Pine, CA - May 1, 2004
Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon - Oklahoma City - April 25, 2004 - 3 reports
Muddy Moose Trail Races - Wolfeboro, NH - April 25, 2004
Zane Grey - Pine, AZ - April 24, 2004
Boston Marathon - Boston - April 19, 2004 - 8 reports
London Marathon - London, UK - April 18, 2004
Brickyard - Martinez to Port Costa, CA - April 18, 2004
20K at Moab - Moab Utah - April 17, 2004
Run with the Rebels - Las Vegas, NV - April 17, 2004
Clear Lake Earth Day 5K - Clear Lake, Iowa - April 17, 2004
Ahwatukee Foothills YMCA Spring 5K - Phoenix, AZ - April 17, 2004 - 2 reports
Mesa Classic - Mesa, Arizona - April 9, 2004
St Louis Marathon - St Louis, MO - April 4, 2004 - 2 reports
Platte River Trail Run - Littleton Colorado - Sunday, April 4, 2004
Umstead 100 - Umstead State Park, Raleigh NC - April 3 & 4, 2004
Rockin K - Kanapolis Lake, Kansas - April 3, 2004
Eisenhower Marathon - Abilene, KS - March 27, 2004
Usery Pass Trail Race - Mesa, AZ - March 27, 2004
Bataan Death March - White Sands Missile Range, NM - March 21, 2004
Crown King Scramble 50M/50k - Phoenix Arizona - March 13, 2004 - 3 reports
Catalina Island Marathon - Catalina Island, California - March 13, 2004
O’Round the Loch Run - Emmetsburg, Iowa - March 13, 2004
Old Pueblo 50 - Sonoita, AZ - March 6, 2004
Run to the Sun - Phoenix, AZ - February 28, 2004
Mt Mitchell Challenge - Black Mountain, NC - February 28, 2004
Four Peaks Mountain Race - North of Fountain Hills, AZ in - February 21, 2004
New World Snowshoe Championship - Luck, Wisconsin - February 14, 2004
USS Frank Cable Valentine’s Day 5 K - US Naval Base, Guam - February 13, 2004
Birmingham Mercedes Marathon - Birmingham, AL - February 8, 2004
Rocky Raccoon 100 mile - Huntsville State Park, North of Houston - February 7-8, 2004 - 2 reports
Pemberton Trail Race - Fountain Hills, AZ - February 7, 2004 - 2 reports
Death Valley Trail Marathon - Death Valley CA - February 7, 2004
Tonto Fun Run - Cave Creek - January 24, 2004
Lost Dutchman 8K Trail Race - Apache Junction, AZ - January 18, 2004
Disney World Marathon - Orlando, FL - January 11, 2004
PF Chang Rock and Roll Marathon - Phoenix, AR - January 11, 2004
Avalon 50 - Catalina Island, CA - January 10, 2004
Fat Ass 50K - Missouri Headwaters State Park, Montana - January 3, 2004
Manatee River Run 5 Miler - Snead Island, Palmetto, FL - December 27, 2003
Honolulu Marathon - Honolulu, HI - December 14, 2003
USATF Junior Olympics Cross Country National Championship - Albuquerque, NM - December 13, 2003
Anthem Holiday Classic Candy Cane 10K - Anthem, AZ (north of Phoenix) - December 13, 2003
Tucson Half Marathon - Tucson, AZ - Sunday, December 7, 2003
OTHTC 50km - Ridgcrest, CA - December 7, 2003
Rock Canyon Half Marathon - Pueblo - December 7, 2003 - 8 reports

View 2003 race reports


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Leadville Trail 100 Mile Race Across the Sky - Leadville, CO - August 21-22, 2004

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: Finish (with my wife’s hand in mine)
Results: Finish (with my wife’s hand in mine)

General Summary:
Out and back course through the venues of Tabor boat ramp, Mayqueen, Hagerman’s Pass Road, Sugarloaf Pass, Fish Hatchery, Outward Bound, Halfmoon Campground, Mount Elbert Trailhead, Twin Lakes, Lake Creek, Willis Gulch (Big and Small), Hope Pass, Vicksburg, and finally Winfield. Lowest point is at Twin Lakes (~9200’) and the highest is at Hope Pass (~12600’) with an average altitude of about 10200’. Aid stations occur at Mayqueen, Fish Hatchery, Halfmoon, Twin Lakes, Hope Pass, and Winfield (both out and back). Cutoff times exist for at all aid stations except for Mayqueen on the outbound leg. One creek crossing just past Twin Lakes, through Lake Creek, was about calf high and numbingly refreshing. Weather for the day was cool. Hope Pass weather was unpredictable as usual, we experienced clouds, rain, hail, lightning, and snow with strong wind. It was good the llamas seemded to be tied down (-: Crew support vehicles were allowed all the way to Winfield due to road being so wet. Usually, th at’s not allowed due to dust and crew vehicles must park about 2.5+ miles away. The only other remarkable event was being stung by a wasp on the south side of Hope Pass. The last time we did a run there, my wife Laura was stung on about the same part of the course, which was hard to imagine because we were in about the 12,300 foot area with all rocks, near freezing temperatures, in falling snow. The wasp stung me in the ankle which made my ankle swell severely. The pain lasted throughout the remainder of the race. I guess I smelled bad enough the animals didn’t want to be around because I noticed pica running from the trail continuously(-; Trail could have been better marked for night running. We helped people coming out of the woods because they were lost )-:

Things Done Right:
Ran with my wife!
Ran all year with the Incline Club!
Committed to goal in November, first club run.
Hydrated and fueled just right, no weight loss.
Started early with planning, planned in depth, 26 pages of typed notes for crew.
Ran the course previously, in training and in a race.
Ran the first part slower than previous runs, amazing how 8 minutes exchanged for over 1 hour in the end (we ran it an hour faster than I had previously run).
Had an outstanding crew/pacers in Willie Alexander, Mark Goodell, Laura Kelecy (all the way from Hawaii), Stephen Remillard, and Mike Wasson.
Brought every piece of running clothes we own, you never know what you’ll need with unpredictable weather.
Had more than enough food.
Had more than enough water, Gatorade, and de-carbonated soda.
Used very small radios to alert crew to location and allowed them to be fully prepared for our arrival (which I had already planned for them times of arrival based on departure time from last station).
Fully utilized pacers from 50 miles on.
Used numerous pairs of shoes, with my favorite socks and lubrication (Bag Balm).
Ran with orthodics.
Used hot tub therapy to keep healthy.
“Clocked” ourselves ahead each day of the week (got up more early each morning).
Went to bed at 6pm and got up at 2am to ensure 8 hours of sleep.
Stayed with our routine, did not do anything different than when running with club (food, drink, clothing, etc).
Had paper and wet ones available.

Things Done Wrong:
Got my new shoes a week later than desired, shoes were somewhat less flexible than desired.

Any Other Stuff:
This race is really well supported and this one was especially delightful because I ran with my wife whom I love with all my heart (which was beating really fast for a long time). I can’t say thank you enough for my crew, they were outstanding and it made the race so much more enjoyable!

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Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 100

Goal: 20 hours
Results: DNF

General Summary:
I hate to quit. I have never dropped out of a marathon and I’ve run 61. Indeed, I have NEVER dropped out of a race in my life! That was before Leadville.

Two days after the race I still can barely walk. If I hadn’t quit after 87 miles I would certainly have caused much more damage.

A hundred mile race is like 4+ marathons in one day. I had good spots and bad spots. I started out well, ran comfortably to May Queen in 1:44. The actual split is off, because I stopped in the bathroom before I went to the check-in. From May Queen I reached the summit of Sugarloaf Pass in 2:45, running all the way. I started feeling pain in my legs on the way down though. This would persist the rest of the race, especially on the steep downhills. The pain was not sharp and spread throughout both legs. I started Vitamin I, which helped a lot.

After Fish Hatcheries (the other side of Sugarloaf Pass, ele 11,200) I still felt good and ran to Half Moon aid station. Stupidly I didn’t stop. I hit a low point on the 8-mile segment of the Colorado Trail into Twin Lakes. Ran out of water 35 minutes before I got to Twin Lakes, stopped at one point and cupped my hands for water out of a stream, resulting in frozen hands.

I struggled into Twin Lakes looking like a spectre, weighing in at 150--I had lost 7 pounds. My pulse was 90. I sat in a chair and drank and ate for 10 minutes, then went to my support crew (my girlfriend, Rebekka) and spent another 10 minutes fueling and getting ready for Hope Pass. I was moving slowly, but I made it up and over. Emerging onto the road to Winfield it started pouring rain with lightning all around. I ran the 2+ miles up the road to Winfield and got under the shelter before it turned into a torrential downpour, 9hrs59min into the race. This is where I picked up my pacer, Gordon Birdsal. We waited until the worst was over then headed out after about 10 minutes.

Gordon was on a mission to get me hydrated again. He put me on a schedule to drink every ten minutes. It worked. I hiked up Hope Pass pretty well, passing several. Then ran strongly down and all the way into Twin Lakes. The next segment of 15 miles I ran alone. I was fully hydrated though, peeing clear six times! That was an amazing accomplishment. (It’s unusual to come completely back from dehydration. But 100 miles is a long ways and there is lots of time. I heard of people at death’s door (so to speak) come in to an aid station, drink some soup, fuel up, and half an hour later they’d be on their way again, good as new.) I ran pretty well all the way past the Half Moon aide station, but on the last seven miles in to Fish Hatcheries the route turns to gravel and paved road. Running on the pavement caused my already battered knees to feel like they were going to buckle at times. I had had pain in the right hip flexor for the whole race and I think this made me overcompensate and add stress to t he left knee. I also got tendinitis on the forefoot to shinbone. It’s bruised halfway up the shin bone. I could run only ten steps before sharp pain in the left knee would force me to walk. By the time I got into Fish Hatcheries I knew I had done damage.

I picked up my pacer Gordon again for the next and final segment to May Queen Campground on Turquoise Lake. I walked the entire distance in over 4 hours. Slowly. On the way down from Sugarloaf Pass there was sharp pain with every step. At the aid station I iced down both knees, then had a doc look at them. He advised to me to quit, which I did. I could have struggled in under 30 hours, but it would have been ugly, and I definitely would not be running the Jungfrau Marathon in 3 weeks. As it is, I may not anyway. Saw the doctor today though and there is no “structural damage.” Time will heal all.

Things Done Right:
Recovered from dehydration

Things Done Wrong:
Before I run another 100 mile race I will start a weight program to develop non-running leg muscles. An ultra-runner needs strong muscles to “hold together” structurally, especially in the later stages of a race.

Any Other Stuff:
Leadville 100 is incredible. I think I got the bug... I’ll be back!

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Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: Finish/finish under 25 hours
Results: 24:31

General Summary:
First 45 miles I felt tired and weak. After going up and over Hope Pass it was like a second wind and the last 55 miles went very well

Things Done Right:
Went out at a comfortable pace, even though I didn’t feel strong, I’m sure it helped my second 50 miles. Ate and drank frequently. Switched to the soup at Hopeless aid station at mile 45. Continued to drink throughout the entire run.

Used a crew and pacer starting at Fish Hatchery.

Things Done Wrong:
At times thought of who was ahead and behind me. I should have just run my own race.

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Kim Kreb reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: Not DNF, finish under 30 hours, finish under 25 hours
Results: 24:36

General Summary:
The Leadville Trail 100 is part of a 5-race series hosted by Merilee O’Neil and Ken Chloeber of Leadville. The series consists of the Leadville Marathon (to the top of Mosquito Pass) in July, the Silver Rush 50 mile mountain bike race in July, the 100 mile mountain bike race the weekend before the run, a 10K run the day after the mountain bike race, and the 100 mile run. Completing all 5 events gets you a nifty trophy and the title of “Lead-man/woman.” Last year I did both 100 mile events; this year the goal was a “Lead” trophy.

Things Done Right:
Eating is key for me, and I heeded advice given to me by another past “Leadman,” Jan Bear. I had tons of food I really liked with my crew, but the most palatable items were things like yogurt, tapioca pudding, and cottage cheese; things that are full of calories but don’t require chewing. I also managed to get down most of a piece of pizza and a grilled cheese sandwich at mile 60. I guzzled noodle soup at the Hope Pass and Halfmoon aid stations.

I used trekking poles over Hope Pass (more advice from Jan), as I found I could keep a quicker pace. I managed to get down Hope (Winfield side) before the big rains came, but the poles came in handy on the muddy ascent back up the pass.

I was fairly organized this year and let all my pacers know ahead of time what would be expected of them. My crew and pacers all did a great job. My final pacer, Terrie Clouse, was very determined not to let me wander across the finish line in 25:02 or something like that and made me run as much as she could.

I had a knot in one quad after the bike race and 10K the week before. I got a massage mid-week, which helped immensely. I was concerned this would cause me problems during the run, but my quads were fine the entire time so the massage worked.

Things Done Wrong:
The race went very well for me, especially compared to past years. Usually I start falling apart by Halfmoon or the Fish Hatchery, because I haven’t eaten enough and start to get sick to my stomach. This year I didn’t feel sick until about the last 3 miles. I should have had a container of pudding with me instead of the saltines and Ritz crackers that were too dry to choke down.

I had a lot of problems with blisters this summer and thought I had it all under control. I changed shoes and socks frequently and used Sportslick at every stop. My shoes are plenty big, but I still had trouble with blisters on my toes, something that never happens in training. I wasted a lot of time during the race fiddling with my feet.

Since I was training for both the Leadville mountain bike race and the run, I was always too tired to do any real speedwork or hill training for either event. I think I did a better job of balancing my training for each event this year than I did last year, but the quality of some of my workouts was questionable.
Calculator = I used Ted Bidwell’s splits from last year as a target to make less than 25 hours. His splits seemed steady, and it helped to know where I needed to be at what time. I somehow managed to stay right on schedule, which helped my crew immensely.

Any Other Stuff:
Calories are key to enjoying this race. The last 50 miles are a lot more fun when you don’t feel starved and sick to your stomach the whole time. I’ve spent years trying to figure out what I can (and am willing) to eat during the race. My long-time crew man finally told me he wasn’t going to crew for me anymore if I wasn’t willing to eat, so I made a special effort this year. Liquid nutrients like Sustained Energy with Hammer Gel and other protein/carbohydrate concoctions I’m used digest well and are good to supplement, but I need real food over this distance.

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Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: Finish
Results: Finished 26:08

General Summary:
This is a long report, but then again it was 100 miles so what do you expect. I had studied various split times leading up to the race and had made a decision that if I took my time initially and everything went 100% perfect, I could potentially have a strong enough second half to make 25. More realistic, I believed I would finish between 27 and 28 hours. I went out very slow to Mayqueen, taking several walking breaks to keep fresh and made myself stay behind runners I really wanted to pass. Stopped at the first of what would be several outhouse stops as my stomach seemed to be on a two hour emptying cycle. Mayqueen(13.5)time 2:24. My crew grabbed my bottles on the way in and had them filled for me on the way out.

Had a strong run to Fish Hatchery. Got to see my crew and my first view of the wonderful pink “Gina” sign I got to see at every crew point the rest of the race. Felt good at Fish. Stopped for bathroom and refueled with pb and j, some potato chips, and off I went. Time 4:29 (24).

I have never liked the trek from Fish to Half Moon during the training runs. Race day was no exception. I met my crew at tree line, downed a bottle of ensure, and was immediately hit with nausea that lasted into Half Moon. I slowly trudged that piece in a record breaking (not) 46 minutes for the 3 mile section. According to the Leadville website, I was passed by 17 people during that stretch. It felt like 100. Half Moon brought a wonderful outhouse, tums, some coke to quiet my stomach, and away I went. Time out 6:02 (31).

The next stretch into Twin Lakes is my favorite section. I recovered from the nausea, and the fact that I was well rested after my slow walk seemed to help. Had a strong climb up the hill and a great run down. Hit Twin Lakes at 8:00 (40), back on schedule. My crew had my bottles full and a pb and j ready, so a couple bites of food, and off I went, without a rain coat. I hit the parking lot just as my crew realized I had no jacket. I told them not to worry, but thank god they were smarter than me and Harry ran back and caught me on the trail with my jacket.

The climb up Hope Pass was rain and hail, but I actually felt pretty comfy in my jacket. Matt came running by followed about 8 minutes later by Paul. I passed Paul Smith and we talked a bit. Felt strong to the Hopeless aid station. Had some soup. Time 9:47.

The climb up from the Hopeless Aid station seemed to take forever. I think the rest at the aid station killed all momentum. I was surprised at how much I felt the altitude. The back side was a mud slide, and although I usually love downhills, I was a wimp and crawled down the pass while the masses passed me. At the trail head, I met my crew. The tights I had been wearing were chaffing in places women should not have to be chaffed. In a downpour, my crew held me up while I changed socks, shoes and tights. It was so worth the 8 minutes I wasted to be in dry clothes. Off to Winfield I went to hook up with my first pacer Jeff VanBemden. Time out at Winfield 11:35 (50) (almost 30 minutes slower than I wanted to be at that point, damn mud).

Jeff and I had what seemed like an extremely slow climb up Hope Pass. Again the altitude bothered me, but the weather had cleared and the views on top of Hope with the llamas and tents below were amazing. Hopeless Aid Station 13:34.

Thank god again for downhills. Jeff and I ran hard until the flats before the creek crossing. Made up some time to the relief of my crew. Arrived at Twin Lakes at 14:53 (60)
Sat at twin lakes and my crew changed my shoes and socks and off I went with my new pacer Rick Hoopes. We climbed well out of Twin Lakes. Quite honestly, Rick was a slave driver. I am quite convinced that I would have been a 29 hour finisher if Rick wasn’t making me run more than I thought I could from Twin to Fish Hatchery. Every 30 minutes he made me Gel. Every hour it was electrolyte time. Every 5 minutes he was checking to make sure I was drinking. Every runable section he would push me.
Made Halfmoon (69) at 17:25 (after outhouse break) Spent too much time at the aid station just standing around. Out at 17:31.

Suffered a bit to Tree line, but again recovered after meeting with my crew. I was done with solid foods at this point and the gels every 30 minutes seemed to be working. Had strong stretch from tree line to fish hatchery. Passed Paul Sullivan, bummer to see him suffering, especially that late in the run and for that long. Fish Hatchery (76)time — 19:10 after outhouse break. Little disoriented in aid station, but my crew got me dressed in warm clothing, gave me some gummy bears (YEEAAA!) and off I went.

Rick and I had a strong climb up Power Line, but once we were near the top, things took a turn for the worse. My knee began to ache immensely, and the blisters on my feet were beginning to make it painful. This made for a slow, slow decent into mayqueen. The only time I was able to even attempt to run was on Haggerman road. I had also not brought enough E-gel and had to resort to the Power Gel we got at aid stations. That has to be the worst crap you can choke down at 80 miles into a race. My attitude went from bad to worse. 25 hour finish became a fleeting memory. By the time Rick and I walked into Mayqueen, I was very pissy and very in pain. Off to the outhouse I went for my regular pit stop. It seemed like I was only in there a few minutes, but before I knew it my crew was pounding on the door threatening to come in and get me if I didn’t come out. Fine. I checked into Mayqueen (86.5) and dawdled way too long (just because it was really pissing off my crew). They finally threw me out, and off I went w ith my final pacer Werner VanZyl. 22:4?

Its amazing what a few Advil can do. 20 minutes later I was feeling much better. Werner was a great conversationalist and got me out of my bad mood fairly quickly. Although, I must say it was a little defeating to be running my heart out and hear my pacer walking behind me. There was my happy cheering crew at Tabor, then there they were again at the dam. Slow decent and another bathroom stop on mini powerline. Run/walk intervals all the way to sixth street. Threw out the sub 26 re-adjustment goal and made a new goal of beating the sun rise. At the top of the hill I was joined by all three of my pacers to take me to the finish. I could hear my crew cheering us on from a half mile away. I even found enough energy to put on a little sprint to the finish, where I was greeting by a crying crew and my wonderful husband on the phone.
Finish 26:08.

Things Done Right:
I always doubt that I have trained hard enough once I get close to a race, but I trained as much as I could for Leadville, including 5 50 miles training runs/races. I had practiced with different foods, running at night, running on tired legs, running the whole course from Winfield in twice, and finally ended with a hard taper for 3 weeks which included running about 15 miles total the last week. I spent time at altitude. I studied race reports and split times. I went into the race 5 pounds lighter than I was during last year’s season. But, the number one thing I did right was to have a great crew and pacers. Mine were invaluable and I can’t imagine doing it without them.

Things Done Wrong:
The only changes I would have made is to take some immodium ad and to have carried tums and advil along with me rather than having to wait until I met my crew to get relief. I also would have spent less time in the aid stations at night. They seem to draw you in.

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David Reily reports:
Distance: 100
Goal: Finish
Results: DNF’d @ 80 miles going back up Sugarloaf

General Summary:
Course is an out and back run between 9,200’ and 12,600’ on mostly trails, some dirt roads and some asphalt roads. Most sections have easy/moderate ups and downs but there are two significant passes to accomplish, each in both directions. Race starts at 4am with a 30 hour cutoff. Time cutoffs exist for all aid stations except the first. Pacers are allowed after 50 miles. No expo, but free pasta dinner and nice awards ceremony on Sunday at noon. Race organization also offers a training camp weekend normally in late June for $125. Didn’t seem like any registration limits for “getting into” the race. Normal finishing percentage is less than half.

Things Done Right:
Decent amount of trail running on Pikes Peak (all above 9,000’) and also the IC’s Rampart-Williams-Waldo-Ute route. Longest runs were 30, 34, and 49 milers lasting 6.5-12.5 hours. Stayed well hydrated and had the right clothes. Tapered well. Arrived in Leadville on the Wednesday evening before the race for an additional night of acclimization. Had a great crew, plus a pacer. Lucky enough to pick up two additional pacers during the run. Attended the training camp for course orientation doing a 26, a 22 and a night 12 miler. Hooked up with ICer Gina Harcrow for an additional long training run on the course.

Things Done Wrong:
Being smarter and dedicating a little more training time would’ve helped. Being forced to eat would’ve helped.
1. Needed more longer runs with more time on my feet. Could’ve done fewer shorter runs.
2. Didn’t do any 50-mile races in training.
3. Couldn’t overcome by mental aversion to food after mile 65-70 and of course became hypothermic about mile 75. Spent 45 minutes getting warmed back up, but still didn’t restart eating very much.
4. Caught a bad cold three days before the race — thought I had recovered, probably played a small part.
5. Lack of food and falling temperatures dulled my mental toughness.

Any Other Stuff:
Felt great for the first 50 miles. Started getting tired after 60. My crew thinks I had some electrolyte problems — I’m not sure. I think it all boiled down to not forcing food down after 70 miles which then led to the death spiral. I’m happy I attempted this race and learned a lot. Haven’t decided if I’ll be back!
Olympic Games - Athens, Greece - August 21st, 2004

Justin Chaston reports:
Distance: 3000m
Goal: Make the final
Results: 5th — missed the final
Website: http://www.athens2004.com/en/AthleticsMen/results?rsc=ATM033903&frag=ATM033903_C73G

General Summary:
Mostly flat course. A little wet on the top corner. A rough race with some rather unsporting conduct from the Portugese and an unfortunate collision with a barrier for the American. First three laps run too slow for 5th place to make the final — oh well, what’s another 4 years?

Things Done Right:
Built a superb base with the incline club in the summer of 2003. Transformed the strength to speed in the spring of 2004. Got the qualifying time in the warmth of California in April and won the British Trials in June.

Things Done Wrong:
Born too long ago.

Any Other Stuff:
Despite the considerable skepticism from the press as to whether the Greeks could pull off an Olympic Games, they did a really good job capturing the Olympic spirit. Athens, for anyone interested in visiting, is not a good city to run in. The pollution is as bad now as it on my last visit, 20 years ago. August is the month that Athenians vacate the city and head to the islands to deal with the heat. Had I not had a track meet to go to, this is what I would have done!

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Britt Hobo Days - Britt, Iowa - August 14, 2004

Curt krieger reports:
Distance: 10K (5K also available)
Goal: Check to see if track work is paying off. Sub-40
Results: 2nd overall in 38:02.

General Summary:
Typical Iowa festival road race. Nice flat course that circles the town. Good local attendance and fun times for all with a parade and other events all day. This year was blessed by excellent clear weather, temperature in the 50’s and calm wind.

Both races, 10K and 5K, start at the same time and place with a split in direction after about a mile and a half. I was surprised to find myself in first place of the 10K at the split and didn’t seem to be straining to hold the pace. I could see the next runner was Jonathon Conder who had been easily outdistancing me at some races earlier this year. I stayed relaxed and occasionally would try to throw in a surge to attempt to maintain my gap. Unfortunately, younger legs prevailed and Jonathon(28 yrs.) pulled beside me(52 yrs.) after 5 miles. In an effort to convince him that I was still fresh, I threw in a surge as he pulled up to my shoulder but it was short-lived as he continued to reel me in and gain around 10 seconds going into the final two blocks. I was satisfied to have run a faster 10K than I’ve run in quite a while and had fun running at Jonathon’s caliber!

Things Done Right:
Have been working on speedwork by going to the track once and sometimes twice a week. Got some extra sleep during the couple nights before the event(unseasonably cool weather helped). Stayed relaxed in the race and had some fun.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much that I’m unhappy about this time. Maybe could have planned my surge a little better and it would have let me challenge at the finish rather than a few blocks earlier!

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Bridger Ridge Run - Bozeman, Montana - August 14, 2004

Gary Hellenga reports:
Distance: approx. 20 miles
Goal: Finish in one piece and still be able to run the Ascent next weekend!
Results: Achieved first goal — second half To Be Determined

General Summary:
This race is all up and down. Seems like a lot of the course isn’t really runable. Still, a lot of fun. The trails are too narrow to pass without support from those being passed — luckily, everyone was very courteous about this, and readily made the effort to make a place to pass. Too bad the race was held on the hottest weekend of the year, though!

Things Done Right:
Ran the parts that made sense; was fairly patient with holding back on the part where running wasn’t smart. Drank copiously at aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t pay close enough attention to a knee problem that has persisted all summer, and it basically stopped working for me on the downhill sections. I believe I lost at least an hour of time by not being able to run downhill adequately.

Any Other Stuff:
Legs have recovered well, but I seem to have caught a cold or something. We’ll see how the Ascent goes!

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La Luz - New Mexico - August 1, 2004

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 9 miles
Goal: not fall down
Results: did not fall down
Website: http:// www.aroadrun.org/La_Luz/La_Luz.htm

General Summary:
Great prep race for the peak, especially the ascent. Gain 4,600 feet over the nine mile course. Finish at 10,600 feet. First 1.8 miles paved, then single track. Footing not as good as Barr Trail, especially in the “slide” area. Down side - race date may be changed to September next year.

My time (1:58:40) was within a minute of my time last year, not bad considering a week before the race I took a fall on Barr Trail (at the same place I broke my finger last year) this time I cracked two ribs. Doctor’s advise was to not fall down again and not do activities that sharply increase the pain. Given it only hurt badly when I laughed, sneezed, coughed or ran downhill and given that the race was an ascent I decided to go for it. (Advice from MC, who has personal experience with cracked ribs, also was significant!)

Things Done Right:
Well trained (lots of altitude and hill work) for event and more tapered than planned - just biking and hiking for a week due to ribs. Good effort - was preoccupied with ribs prior to race but worked on my race mantra - mantra was “relax - focus - even effort.” Mantra worked until slide area. Good practice passing folks on the trail and learning the extra energy exerted to do so. Ribs were only minor factor. I ran well until the slide area.

Things Done Wrong:
Lost focus in slide area (footing very poor in this section of the course - starts at about 7 mile mark - lasts about 1.5 miles), never quite got back to mantra after that. Until that point had not been passed since early in the run. Passed by a number of runners in this section - probably being too careful due to ribs. Walked a lot, more due to footing than anything else - but had trouble getting going at same effort level in areas where footing was not bad.

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Tinqui 10K - Tinqui, Peru - July 23, 2004

Chaz Lalonde reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: finish without walking! 56:24
Results: Successful, except for one bathroom break

General Summary:
My wife Mona and I spent 12 days in Peru on a running adventure organized by Andes Adventure. We spent 4 days running/hiking on the Inca Trail into Machu Picchu. The following week we were further in the Andes with a 5 day hike/run all between 12,400’ and 17’000. The Tinqui 10K was our 5th and final day around Mt Ausangate. We started at 13,950’ and finished at 12,400’.

Things Done Right:
Did not eat any solids prior to the 6 AM start.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have drank earlier and more prior to the start so that I would not have to take a bathroom break 15 minutes into the race.

Any Other Stuff:
With 4 nights camping @ 14,000’ or higher I have 3 new personal bests on Pikes Peak since my return: 24:40 to top of w’s on Thu 7/29/04 IC run, 52:16 for top 3 miles on Fri 7/30/04 , and 1:35:11 from Barr Camp to top on 8/1/04 IC run!!!!

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Barr Trail Mountain Race - Barr Trail / Pikes Peak / Manitou Springs, Colorado - July 18, 2004

Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 12.4 Miles
Goal: Run Smart
Results: 2:25:03
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com/

General Summary:
All the recent rain made for soft footing, with almost ideal temperatures. Didn’t have the time to Barr Camp that I had hoped for, felt stronger this year on the downhill, more work required.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well, starting the day before.
Warmed up from Memorial Park.
Patience.
Steady cadence.
Recorded anticipated split times.
Tried to maintain focus and positive energy.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t follow my usual pre-race routine by laying everything out the night before, as a result I forgot my bib number and had to return home to retrieve it.
Some intestinal cramping causing unanticipated pit stop.

Any Other Stuff:
Once again, this has to be the most well organized mountain race there is. A special thanks to the BTMR committee for another excellent job! Good school participation again this year, although I had to wait for water at No Name creek.


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Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2hr 15 min
Results: 2hr 9min 1sec
Website: http://

General Summary:
Great weather, great course.

Things Done Right:
Good taper, good breakfast, good training to date.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have found one more bathroom before the start, or had one less cup of coffee.

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Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 13 Miles
Goal: 2:30
Results: 2:41:11

General Summary:
I was pleased with my splits on way up to Barr camp. It took me longer to get down than I had hoped. Knee has been bothering me some this year.

Things Done Right:
Plenty hydrated for several days prior to race.
Thursday runs always pay off.

Things Done Wrong:
As is usually the case I need to run longer long runs.

Any Other Stuff:
Didn’t fall on any cacti this year.

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Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 13M
Goal: make the cut-off
Results: finished, but did not make the cut-off

General Summary:
This seems to be a very difficult race for me, but I’m still glad I made the attempt. My splits went fairly well up until Barr Camp. Had asthma problem even running down.

Things Done Right:
Good pace initially going up and drank a lot. Running hydros helped a lot.

Things Done Wrong:
Anxiety about the race and making the cut-off. Negative thinking may have contributed because I have run it several times training in less than 3:30.

Any Other Stuff:
It was very nice to be a part of a race which contributes so much to local schools financially. I thought the aid stations were great and the race was very well organized. I am always impressed with that.

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Doug Laufer aka Rufus T Firefly reports:
Distance: 12 miles — trail
Goal: Improve on prior years
Results: Goal met

General Summary:
Ran a 2:15:17 and won age group — time was six minute improvement over last year and best for BTMR by 1:22.

Things Done Right:
Good race preparation — mini taper, plenty of rest and fluids — mentally focused; clear idea of desired pace.

Smooth start, hit splits pretty much right on throughout race. Focused on even effort and small steps in steeper spots — it worked!! (Reading Matt’s & Jim’s training guide — not only is it on target; reading it makes you a lot more aware of stuff you already know you should be doing — relax, even effort, stay focused)

Things Done Wrong:
Not much — still need to work on downhill running.

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Diane Repasky reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2 hours 35 minutes
Results: 2 hours 30 minutes 18 seconds

General Summary:
Mountain trail, elevation gain. Great stepping stone race for the ascent or pp marathon.

Things Done Right:
Did not go out too hard, even effort so I still had something to give as I approached Barr Camp. Downhill shortened my stride and picked up the cadence.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
Consistent training has definitely been a positive factor. Have made it to nearly every club run and it made for an enjoyable but challenging race up to Barr Camp and back. Feel positive heading into the marathon.

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Andrea Cichosz reports:
Distance: 12
Goal: To get the T-Shirt, be around 3 hours
Results: 3:05:37

General Summary:
This is the first time I ran this race and felt it was a good to judge my condition for the Pikes Peak Ascent. I liked the spirit of the event and the fact, that the start waited for the “pottiers".

Things Done Right:
Took enough GU, stayed behind a gentleman in the switchbacks, not to go to fast.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably did the switchbacks still to fast, doodled on the way down, or I could have been under 3 hours.
Probably didn’t drink enough.
Calculator =

Any Other Stuff:
I will run it again next year, maybe even get my son to participate.

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5430 Half-Ironman Triathlon - Boulder, CO - July 18, 2004

Heather Stites reports:
Distance: 1.2m swim, 56m bike, 13.1m run
Goal: To finish my first triathlon EVER
Results: 5:35 (completely amazed with the results)
Website: http://www.5430tri.com

General Summary:
A completely new experience. Have been mostly focusing on running (70+ miles per week) and have had very little time for biking and swimming. Always something that I have wanted to compete in and see if I might be good at it. Every leg went fairly smoothly (with a few hang-ups though) and finished strong. Lots of fun!

Things Done Right:
Training for the running portion.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough biking and swimming (already knew that).

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Garnet Mountain Challenge - near Big Sky, Montana - July 17, 2004

Gary Hellenga reports:
Distance: 3.5 miles
Goal: Nothing specific
Results: mid-pack
Website: http://www.wildlands.org/grc2004.html

General Summary:
First annual event to help protect water quality of the Gallatin River. Scenic 2,845 ft climb from Gallatin Canyon to the Garnet Mountain fire lookout tower. Mostly single-track trail through pine forest (made passing difficult). Too steep to really run in a number of sections.

Things Done Right:
Walked the steeps and ran the locally flat sections (learned this technique from doing the top mile of Barr Trail many times!). Was able to go hard and reclaim a place or two at the end.

Things Done Wrong:
Started a bit too fast. And, as usual, didn’t have enough training under my belt!

Any Other Stuff:
Heard a moose cow and calf crossed the trail in front of a few runners. Views from the top were tremendous!

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Burnco Calgary Marathon - Calgary, Alberta, Canada - July 11, 2004

Steve Sargeant reports:
Distance: 42.2 km (26.2 miles)
Goal: Set a 3:56 pace for my boss’s boss’s first marathon
Results: Boss’s boss finished in 3:55, me in 4:10
Website: http://www.calgarymarathon.com

General Summary:
A great race that is part of the 11 days of the Calgary Stampede (+1,000,000 visitors each year). The course starts downtown and goes through the Stampede grounds, the Calgary Zoo and then follows the Bow River for about half the race.

Things Done Right:
Paid attention to my body instead of being too proud to back off the pace we were doing. At 28 km, I was fading but my boss’s boss (Mac) was doing really well so I told him to go on and not wait for me. I backed off my pace by 30 sec/mile and felt like that was a manageable pace given my fitness.

Things Done Wrong:
It was only 10 weeks between marathons for me which is pushing my luck. It caught up to me in that my right knee gave out at 34 km. I ended up walking for a kilometer until the Advil and Tylenol kicked in.

Any Other Stuff:
It wasn’t something I did wrong but Mac forgot his watch!!!

As part of the post-race process, I was asked to partake in the organizing committee’s traffic management post-mortem. It was very interesting to listen to the police, organizers and the City’s special events management talk about what went wrong and what needs to be fixed for a marathon that is growing each year. Next year the roads will be completely closed rather than partially closed.

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Midnight Madness - Ames, Iowa - July 10, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 5K (10K also)
Goal: Second race of the day for me; age group placing
Results: 19:34 good for 2nd in age group
Website: http://www.fitnesssports.com/july_races/Madness/MidnightMadness_info.html

General Summary:
33rd Annual Race with a tradition of attracting top runners. Names like Dick Beardsley, Mike Slack, Mark Curp have been here in the past. Recent winners have been from Kenya. The 5K attracts well over 1000 runners each year even though conditions tend to be hot and humid. The party after the race is an event that you’re sure not to miss!

Things Done Right:
Began working on the track to improve speed. I was tending to feel as if I was running long and slow all the time. I tried to see if the speed work and two short races in one day would bring back some leg turnover. (I did achieve my goal in the morning of setting a new age group record (11:51) in the 2 mile at Duesey Days, which is a race I wrote about last year.)

Things Done Wrong:
Not much to be concerned with here. I normally would not race two races in one day but as I said, I planned to be working on speed. I had hoped to stay a bit more focused in the 5K but let my mind convince me to back off enough that I dropped a place in my age group during the final mile.

Any Other Stuff:


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Camp As Sayliyah Independence Day 5/10K - Camp As Sayliyah, Doha, Qatar - 7/4/2004

Karl Schab reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Finish
Results: Personal Worst

General Summary:
My Sunday stared with a 4:15 am wake up and shower, in order to make the 5 am show time. I had decided that the next time there was a race at camp, I would run the 10K instead of the 5K. What a silly decision. Two reasons, but a warning to gentle readers: I will be talking about bodily functions here, so skip ahead if this overwhelms your sensitivities. Reason one has been previously analyzed here, and it is the heat. And while this race started a half hour earlier (5:30 am) than the last one I ran, it was probably 5-10 degrees hotter. So I sipped water from a bottle the whole run.

Reason two requires a digression. Ever since a recent trip to the UAE, I have been battling some intestinal “issues.” Let’s just say that I have become somewhat unpredictable in the timing of the daily constitutional, and it’s not likely to be, um, well, solid. On race day, I thought I was pretty well cleaned out before I got to the event. I was wrong. OK, I’ve got that part over with.

There were probably 50 runners total at the start, but only 15 were running the 10K. We started before the 5K, and I set a maintainable 9:30 per mile pace, just looking to finish in under an hour. I was clearly going to be the last 10K finisher. There was a van (the “meatwagon”) following me. The course for the race was a 2.5K track that was out-and-back for 5K, and two trips for 10K. I got about 3.5K under my belt before the 5K runners started catching me. By the time I hit the turnaround at 5K I knew that I could be in need of a toilet, in a hurry. I trotted (no pun intended) bravely on, and made it to the turnaround at 7.5K before the bathroom emergency hit. By then the 5K was over and I was the last 10K runner by a pretty good margin, although my ego requires me to tell you that several 10K runners dropped out after one lap.

Did I mention the bathroom emergency? It was as though I had eaten 10 bags of those potato chips made with olestra, the indigestible fat that causes a certain “leakage.” Fortunately, God was smiling on me, and there was a porta-john less than 50 feet away. And the good news was that I made it there in time. The bad news was that it was like an EZ-bake oven inside, and so I became drenched in sweat while I was in there, for less than 2 minutes. When I staggered out, the meatwagon was there, waiting patiently, and the medic inside looked like he was going to call for reinforcements. But I waved him off with a smile (forced) and a thumbs-up sign, and got back on the road. Now the 90 plus degree breeze felt cool, and I actually gained speed all the way home. I finished in just over an hour (hooray, another Camp As Sayliyah personal worst) and got the t-shirt.

Things Done Right:
Entered the race. Unwilling to surrender to the heat or my gut.

Things Done Wrong:
Inadequate training.

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3rd Annual Otter House 5K - Castine, Maine - July 4, 2004

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: 8 minute pace
Results: 25:04

General Summary:
Part of the 4th of July events, the 5K benefits the Otter House, the Castine Community Child Development Center. Other events include a children’s costume parade, Fire Truck rides, sack races (don’t ask!), tug-o-wars for kids and adults and cook-outs. The weather was pretty good, 60’s and very humid, and the race basically went around the very historic town.

Things Done Right:
Looked forward to the activities.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
Castine is a very typical hilly, Maine coast town. Although largely unknown these days, it has a significant historical past having been fought over by first the Dutch, French and American Indians, and later the British and “the rebels” i.e. Americans. This period dates from the early 1600’s up to the 1780’s. Little known is the fact that Paul Revere faced Courts Martial for leaving the battle field in the face of the enemy, the Brit’s, during the Penobscot Expedition of 1779 — 1784.
Castine population triples in summer, when wealthy families from Boston, New York and parts south, take up residence in their summer homes. My wife’s (Sarah)family has roots dating back to the early 1700’s, and have a number of houses in the area.

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Mt. Marathon Race - Seward, Alaska - July 4, 2004

Shawn Erchinger reports:
Distance: 3.5 miles
Goal: sub 60 minutes
Results: 60:43
Website: www.sewardak.org

General Summary:
The Mt. Marathon Race started in 1917 and is said to be America’s second oldest footrace next to the Boston Marathon. (I’ve never checked to see if this is true) The race starts in downtown Seward, AK and heads up a slight incline over paved streets for 1/2 mile to the base of Mt. Marathon. Then you begin a climb to 3,022 feet in just over 1 mile. It’s steep. This race has been popular for members of the US Cross Country Ski and is Alaska's most famous race.

Things Done Right:
I went out conservatively and managed to maintain a steady pace up to the summit. I didn’t get hurt and lived to run another day.

Things Done Wrong:
I simply didn’t learn what to expect going from altitude down to sea level. If you run at the same pace at sea level that you train at 6,000 - 10,000 feet you’ll finish the race feeling like you just went for a walk. And you’ll get smoked!

Any Other Stuff:
This race is extremely difficult to get into because it’s been limited to 300 runners in the past. You can enroll online at the website.


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Vail Hill Climb - Vail, CO - Sunday, July 4, 2004

Mary Jo Campbell reports:
Distance: 7.5 miles
Goal: Make the cut-off of 2 hours, not be last.
Results: 1:39:11
Website: http://www.vailrec.com/adult/running

General Summary:
I did this race 12 years ago and knew it would be a good Peak preparation run with 2200’ elevation to climb. My legs were dead from climbing 2 Fourteeners the day before, but I needed a more aerobic workout and signed up race day to suffer with others and finish off any muscle fibers that weren’t already trashed.

Things Done Right:
Arrived early to get bib number; tried to stay hydrated before, during and after; had a Hammer Gel handy for when the few bites of oatmeal wore off; ditched the long sleeved layer at the last minute; saved enough energy to pass 5 people in the final yards.

Things Done Wrong:
If I was approaching it as a race that mattered and not an expensive training run ($32), I sure wouldn’t have climbed 2 mountains the day before and sleep would have been more of a priority. Should have signed up ahead of time at Active.com and saved $10 (Ouch) but had to work around several other family members’ schedules. Nothing was confirmed until after 11 pm the night before.

Any Other Stuff:
Mile markers weren’t always obvious. Nice goodie bag selection of snacks. No small t-shirts available at the finish, so I have another swimsuit cover-up. =)

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Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: 7.5 miles
Goal: Break 60:00
Results: 35th in 56:47

General Summary:
The Vail Hill Climb is a 7.5 mile race up Vail mountain. The first 1.5 miles are flat on pavement and then the rest is on the jeep roads of Vail Mtn. It is a pretty good climb (2200’ in 6 miles), but no Pikes Peak. I was actually surprised to have about a mile of flat and downhill once we got up on the dirt.

Things Done Right:
Went out conservatively on the flat section. Passed a lot of people in the first mile of the climb.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not scout the course before hand. I don’t think I pushed as hard as I could. I kept thinking it was gong to get steeper, and it never did. This might have cost me about 60-120s. Next year, I will know that I can push harder!

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Nancy Hobbs reports:
Distance: 7.6 miles (course shortened .4 due to construction) Trails/service roads up Vail Mountain
Goal: 1:15; top 20 women
Results: 1:09; 17th woman; 4th in age group.

General Summary:
Elevation/altitude change biggest factor. Switchbacks long and sweeping up the mountain.

Things Done Right:
Paced in one gear the whole way. Figured the race a good training run because legs still sore from the race last weekend (2:15 effort). Wanted to just grind up the hill which I did. Ran down single track trail post awards to get some downhill training for Pikes Peak Marathon. Good overall up/down run.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough rest from the race weekend before, but I’ll be tired for PPM so get used to it!

Any Other Stuff:
Great awards, NACAC Champs and Teva Mountain Team selection race. Very competitive field.

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Andy Kovats reports:
Distance: ~7.3M
Goal: 65 min
Results: 65:01

General Summary:
One of the most competitive fields I can ever remember racing in. Flats and even slight downhills in 2nd half of course were nice and the gondola ride down was really fun too. Several IC’ers attended and it was nice to hear some in the crowd cheering for us.

Things Done Right:
Was able to capitalize on the flats and make up a few places and some good time. IC Thursday uphill quality workouts are great training for this course.

Things Done Wrong:
Took off too fast, but it is hard not to with this course. The start was very crowded and even starting several rows back from my usual point did not offset the increased number of faster runners. Also there was a bottleneck effect with a narrow street at the start so runners behind were pushing the pace as well. Due to some kind of mixup with some of the Active.com registrations, I had to stand in a 2nd long line to get my bib and only had about 10 minutes to warm up which was not enough. Needed to focus more on a fast turnover early in the race, did finally do this and it helped the 2nd half of the course.

Any Other Stuff:
The first 3/4 mile or so is relatively flat and on pavement which also adds to the tendency to start fast. After that the course follows a wide packed-mud/dirt cat walk on the ski slopes and gains elevation from about 8,000 ft to the Gondola top around 10,200 ft

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Leadville Trail Marathon - Leadville, CO - July 3, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4:15, Top Ten
Results: 4:32, 11th
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com/

General Summary:
I entered this race just a couple weeks ago, thinking it couldn’t hurt to get it in as part of the buildup to the Leadville 100 mile race that I am running next month. Glad I did.

Rebekka and I climbed Mt Oklahoma, 13,842’, on Friday. Oklahoma is on the Continental Divide west of Massive and one of CO’s highest 100 summits. I’ve climbed 74/100. It offers rare views of the backsides of Massive and Elbert, as well as the Elks on the distant western horizon. I don’t think climbing it affected my race the next day.

About 400 rugged mtn runners lumbered out of downtown Leadville at 8 AM. Right away the course got down to business of gaining altitude. Leadville is at 10,200 feet and that would be the lowest elevation we saw for the rest of the race. After a couple miles I fell in just behind the two leaders. One was Paul Pope of Col Spgs, and the eventual winner. They were enjoying a casual conversation. I asked myself if I felt like I could carry on a conversation. The answer was no, so I backed off. About 30 minutes into the race the lead woman passed me. She went on to win in record time of 4hrs flat and was 3rd overall! Impressive.

We climbed past two aid stations and soon were soaring above treeline at approx. 12,500’. The jeep road became singletrack as we traversed around Baldy Mountain. Gorgeous views extended towards the Mosquitos. Then we lost nearly all the elevation, dipping down to about 11,000 feet before the real test: the steep jeep road leading to the half-way point, 13,100 foot Mosquito Pass. This was tough.

I was in ninth going in to the last stretch, but slipped to 12th on the climb. I passed one back at the summit, and stayed in 11th until the finish. PPM Age group record holder for 40-44, and 45-49, Senovio Torres passed me on the climb. He just turned 50, so look for another record to fall next month.

My splits were 2:24 to the Pass, then 2:08 return. This is not a good split, since it is an out and back with net loss of 3000 feet on the return. Indeed, my first 3-mile segment, all uphill, was only two minutes slower than my return on the same stretch, this time all downhill! I felt beat up. Directly after the race I thought it was harder than the PPM. The next day though I decided it wasn’t. It is the 2nd hardest measured marathon I’ve run out of 61.

Things Done Right:
Carried camel pak and gel. Kept well hydrated on my own timetable.

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe not enough miles on my legs.

Any Other Stuff:
Leadville is a quirky, quaint corner of Colorado. This was my closest look. Interesting history. They need to clean it up though. Get rid of junk cars and knock some buildings down.


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Don Bartow reports:
Distance: 26.2 M
Goal: In order: 6:00 — finish — have enough legs left to run the back side of the Leadville 100 (30 M)
Results: 5:20 (49/218 overall, 19/57 division) — Had legs to do 30 M more.

General Summary:
Beautiful race, both the course (out and back) and the scenery. Chatting with other runners, this race is comparable in difficulty to the Pikes Peak Marathon.

Things Done Right:
Paced, hydrated, and ate very well, was feeling very strong and able to kick into the finish very well. Also held back sufficiently to be able to do the training run planned for later that day.

Things Done Wrong:
Started a little fast, but don’t think that hurt. The marathon went very well. (Still need to work on nutrition during the longer runs as I was bonking on the last leg later that night.)

Any Other Stuff:
The course starts in Leadville and has about half mile of pavement before hitting gravel roads and jeep trails. Climbs to the first aid (3.9M), rolls awhile trending up, single track trending down to the second aid (7.3M). Back on gravel roads downhill to aid #3 at the bottom of Evans Gulch. A long climb up to Mosquito Pass (13,188 ft), aid #4, and the turn-around. I found the downhill back to aid 5 (3 outbound) very difficult as it is scree on hardpack. The footing was unsteady and lots of hard edges to catch on. Reverse the course back inbound with the finish downhill.

After lunch with the family, I ran three sections of the back-side of the Leadville 100. This started me at Winfield at about the time I expect to hit the turnaround in the race. Winfield to Twin Lakes over Hope Pass, Twin Lakes to Halfmoon, and Fish Hatchery to May Queen. Needed lights about halfway thru the Twin Lakes to Halfmoon leg.

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Rick Crawford reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: under 7hrs
Results: 6:29:46

General Summary:
26.2 miles starting at 10,200ft and climbing to the top of Mosquito pass 13,187 with lots of elev.+/- throughout the old mining district. In my opinion tougher than the PPM.

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James Cannon reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: 6:00
Results: 6:58

General Summary:
As the announcer proudly stated, the entire course of this marathon is above 10,000 ft elevation, and it surely felt it. The course is run on mostly rutted and rocky four wheel drive paths through mine country east of Leadville with some gravel road and single track. It is an out and back course circling Bald Mountain going out (and coming back) and hitting the midway point with a killer climb up to Mosquito Pass (13.1k ft.). The race was fairly small (230) and the race support good with three well stocked aid stations. No mile markers or time splits on the course, but this race is more about competing in and finishing the grueling course more than setting a PR or qualifying for Boston.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the IC. All those winter and spring runs up Rampart Range Road, Intenman, and Barr paid off. Not that I crushed the course (it actually crushed me), but I was able to keep good stamina and keep moving. Again, this race was more about finishing and declaring victory, than setting a PR.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough altitude training. The lack of oxygen in the air really fatigued me more than at Front Range elevations. I really felt my heart rate go up and breath get short on the inclines, especially above 11k ft. Even felt my head spinning a few times.

Any Other Stuff:
I spoke with a man who said this race is tougher than Pikes Peak. I don’t know about that, but it was sure tough. Even the downhills were treacherous. Steep and through loose rock. Also, the views are killer. Facing west, the line up of 14ers is unmatched. I was wise and brought my camera to document the event. Probably the smartest thing I did all weekend.

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Tour du Lac (Around the Lake) - Bucksport, Maine - June 26, 2004

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: To beat my 2002 time of 91 minutes
Results: 88:12

General Summary:
Typical Maine/New England small town race, very hilly, paved and good quality field. Winning time 52 and change, first over 60 runner did 73 plus minutes. Great crowd, well organized and $6 entry. Some of the best trophy’s, made of Maine granite and embossed with the race logo.

Things Done Right:
Warmed up properly.

Things Done Wrong:
Too little sleep, this being the weekend of a relative’s wedding. Lots of late night parties and too much libations!

Any Other Stuff:
Almost all races in this area will be testing. Even with the altitude training behind you, you will have a good workout, and against a tough bunch of runners. I find that I really have to work on turnover speed as soon as I get here, and I do improve with lots of speed work.

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Double Dipsea - Stinson Beach, CA - June 26, 2004

Nancy Hobbs reports:
Distance: 13.7 miles/2300’ vertical or so
Goal: 2:30
Results: 2:15:09
Website: http://dserunners.com

General Summary:
This is a great alternative to the Dipsea, though longer. Best thing...no lottery...no wondering if you’re in or not. Plus, no need to drive back to your car...just run. Great to start and finish on Stinson Beach as a backdrop. Views incredible, great trail, lots and lots of steps!

Things Done Right:
Had a Gu before the race (about 15 minutes prior), took Gu with me and water/Gatorade mix. Hydrated often. Had one Gu 1 hour into the race, remainder at turn around (1:05 and change). Paced myself very well keying on people ahead of me. This is a handicap race so I was in the wave at 8:48, first wave started at 8:15. I was able to pass all but two people and only 4 guys passed me in the last few miles.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have had some Gu about 1:40 into the race. I was tired for the last few miles and maybe a pickmeup Gu would have helped.

Any Other Stuff:
Single track, trees, dirt, rocky, views, great support.


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Estes Park Half Marathon - Estes Park - June 20, 2004

Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: 1hr45m
Results: 1h45m57s: 3rd in age group, 21st overall
Website: http://www.epmarathon.org

General Summary:
Beautiful course, nice rolling hills, nothing very steep, but one climb at about 5 miles goes on for approx 1.5 miles. Well organized for its first year, the course runs on the roads around and thru Estes Park.

Things Done Right:
Got some good rest. Felt fairly good thru the whole race. Trained hard on the hills all year so far.

Things Done Wrong:
Perhaps went a little too hard on the long climb at mile 5, past about 8 people on the way up, but the legs felt a little tired on the following long downhill into Estes and got past by 3 of the runners I past on the uphill.

Any Other Stuff:
Again beautiful course in my opinion, better scenery than Steamboat which is supposedly one of the prettiest marathons in the country.

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West Highland Way - Scotland - June 19, 2004

Norman McLennan reports:
Distance: 95 miles
Goal: to finish
Results: 8 th
Website: http://www.westhighlandwayrace.org

General Summary:
Feeling bad after only 10 miles, struggling I think due to a cold week before race, start to feel better after 50 odd miles, funnily enough last 35 miles were fastest.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy early on, didn’t feel like it at the time.

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Bighorn 50 Mile Trail Run - Big Horn Mountains WY - June 19, 2004

Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 miles (actually 52)
Goal: Under 11 hours
Results: 10:54:44
Website: http://bighorntrailrun.com

General Summary:
Beautiful course. Park at the finish, bus you out to the mountains, and you never see civilization again until the last 8 miles through a campground. Great weather, cloudy and cool. Alternate between mountain trails and deer trails where you are running through meadows on narrow single track. Tons of wild flowers.

Things Done Right:
Went out very slow. Tried to keep my attitude positive even when things felt bad. Was able to run the second half almost an hour faster than the first. Ate enough, seems that pb and j sandwiches, fig newtons, and marathon bars all sit well with my stomach. Took 4 succeed pills and had 3 gels. Carried Gatorade in my hand and water on my waste pack to ensure that I am drinking far more Gatorade than water.

Things Done Wrong:
Was fairly upset when my drop bag wasn’t at mile 18 aid station. Spent way too much time there being upset rather than just accepting it and moving on. Probably wasted 10 minutes.

Any Other Stuff:
I seem to be struggling from mile 12-18 at a lot of the long runs. Its good to know that if I just keep moving I can push through it. Great race that has a 30k, 50k, and 100 mile option. Entry fee included good BBQ after run, t-shirt, pancake breakfast at the awards ceremony the next morning, and a great finishers running fleece jacket.


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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 52 miles
Goal: 9:30
Results: 9:18

General Summary:
This is a beautiful course in the BigHorn mountains near Dayton, WY. For the most part the course is downhill for the first 18 miles, uphill for the next 16 and down again for the final 18 with a couple of hills thrown in. The weather was perfect. It was cool at the start and I wore a long sleeve incline club shirt and running pants. I changed into shorts at mile 34 and luckily the sun never really came out. Most of the race is on a rocky single track trail which prevents you from looking at the great scenery all around you. You feel like you are out in the forest in the middle of nowhere, which you are.

Things Done Right:
I hydrated well and really enjoyed the run. I have switched from bringing water to an endurance sports drink. I tried to eat a little at every aid station in addition to gels that I was taking. I have had issues in the past in terms of proper hydration, but I seemed to have solved that problem this year.

Things Done Wrong:
Probably spent too much time at the aid stations, but this was my first 50 mile race and I didn’t want to push too much. Somehow I ended up partially tearing my peroneal tendon in my left foot. I don’t know how or when it happened, but I could barely walk the next day.

Any Other Stuff:
The course starts out at 8800’ and climbs a few hundred feet in the first mile or two before going way down. At this point the course is on a rocky single track trail. At mile 18 is the first full service aid station and where you first drop bag should be ( unless they forgot to bring yours ). You then cross a river and head up for 2000’ in 3.5 miles. From there until the next major aid station( 2nd drop bag location) at mile 34 the course is up and down and parts are on a 4 wheel drive trail. After mile 34 the course alternates a bit from dirt road to rocky single track with some uphill sections. Somewhere around mile 40 you start to run down again through a field of wild flowers. The bad part is that the trail is very steep and rocky and I really hated this part. Eventually you get down and enter a nice canyon for a few miles before hitting a hard dirt road for the final 5 miles.


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Bighorn Mtn 50K - Dayton, Wyoming - June 19, 2004

Kevin Waters reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Between 5:30 and 6:00
Results: 5:38
Website: http://bighorntrailrun.com

General Summary:
Terrific set of runs (100 miles, 50 miles, 50 kilometer, and 30 kilometer) in the Bighorn mountains Northwest of Sheridan, Wyoming. The race organization was great and the aid stations are first class (always nice to run a race where they are also running a 100 miler). We lucked out with the weather, which was cool and overcast. The only downside to the race is the last 5 miles, which are along a flat, uninspiring dirt road. That aside, the mountain scenery was spectacular.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated and ate well. After the first hour (took some time to feel comfortable), found a nice tempo where I was able to run easy for most of the run. My sore back held up well (too bad I can’t say that on the Barr Trail). Walked several of the big hills (learning more about this technique to use in other races). Really helps to keep the legs fresh.

Things Done Wrong:
Went out a little fast, especially on the first few downhills. The quads noticed this later, but it wasn’t too bad.

Any Other Stuff:
Almost stepped on a rattlesnake, but he was running faster than me! Saw some moose on the bus ride into the start, really cool. I will say that the Incline Club runs have really helped me adapt to these ‘hilly’ races.


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San Juan Solstice 50 - Lake City, CO - June 19, 2004

Ted Bidwell reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Sub-12:00
Results: 11:40:53 / 1st in my age group
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com

General Summary:
A great day for one of the two most difficult 50-milers in the U.S. If the two climbs to 13,000 isn’t enough to challenge you, then the short climb to 11,400 at mile 41 will (unless your Matt C). Most of the running from mile 24-35 is above tree line. This is a terrific race, well organized and lots of awards and giveaways.

Things Done Right:
Tapered for a week. Hydrated with water, instead of beer.
Last year I went out to fast and paid the price going up the last climb at mile 41. So this year I went out 10 minutes slower on each split and finished 24 minutes faster.
I usually do not eat and drink enough during races, so I made a point to eat and drink before I felt I needed to.

Things Done Wrong:
I fell to many times during the race. Couple on the snowfields and one really good one coming down the switchbacks at mile 47. I brought a lot of trail rash home with me and gave a blood donation to the mountains.

Any Other Stuff:
Thanks to Gordon Barnett and some of Team CRUD, that crewed for me. I usually do not have a crew and it sure helped me in the aid stations and my results.

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Matt Carpenter reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: In descending order; course record, win, not walk, finish, not dnf
Results: Course record, won, did not walk, finished, did not dnf

General Summary:
Lake City is located 55 miles South of Gunnison. Most telling is that if you click on the race website’s Yahoo map you get a red star located in the middle of nowhere. Oh, what a hidden gem! A small town with a small town feel not spoiled by the trappings of the ski industry. Fishing seems to be as touristy as it gets. However, I was not here to fish!

I had been debating between the Lake City 50 and the Zane Gray 50 in Arizona as my first 50. One too many people telling me that the Zane course was comparable to running down a creek bed full of rocks convinced me that Lake City would be the better choice. I should say right out that this was not my ultra debut as I won the Doc Holiday 35 miler back in the early 90s.

The Lake City course consists of a large counter clockwise loop with 3 major climbs. A 4,000’ plus climb from the start to about 9 miles, another 4,000’ plus climb from 15.7 to about 24 and a 1,700’ climb from 41 to about 44. For the most part, if you are not running up, you are running down — although there were a few level sections along the Continental Divide at 12,000’. The course map is at http://www.lakecity50.com/sj50course72new.jpg and the elevation profile is at http://www.lakecity50.com/profile.gif

As part of my preparations I picked the brains of several ICers and CRUDers who had done the race in the past. Problem was each person I talked to gave a radically different description and at times I wondered if they were talking about the same course. Because terms like “steep,” “rocky” and “runnable” mean different things to different people a recon trip was in order. Yvonne, Kyla and I headed out on Friday the 11th to check out some of the course. I took off on the first 15.7 mile section from the start of Alpine Gulch to the Williams Creek Aid Station. There are about 16 creek crossings in this section which can tend to throw a person for a loop so I wanted to know what I was in for.

Things were going well until about 50 minutes into my run where I came to a section I was not sure about and reached for my map only to find it was no longer in my pocket. I ended up finding most of the course but did have to bushwack the last 4 miles back to the aid station location where Yvonne and Kyla were playing in a creek. Needless to say, getting lost left me a little disconcerted. The next day I bagged my planned section in order to do this section again to find out where I went wrong. I also wanted to try running with lighter shoes and no socks. What a difference — I felt like I was an Indian in moccasins! In fact, these shoes were lighter wet than my other shoes dry:-) I found the rest of the course (and my lost map) which put my mind at ease. Even better was that at a pace I considered my survival pace (a pace I use on new courses so that if I get lost — like the first attempt — I can go a long time) I managed to run 6 minutes under the record split for that section. We drove to a f ew other sections of the course and I ran a mile here and a mile there. There was nothing else to do.

Race week was fairly tough on my mentally. This is the first race in 4-5 years where I was actually nervous. However, nervous is good and can make for a great race. Indeed, some of my worst races were the ones I went into without feeling much of anything which is the way most of my races have been as of late. From the day I signed up for this race I had been getting all kinds of e-mails and feedback each sending a nice shot of adrenalin through my system. There were both good and bad expectations and the pressure to perform was growing. Although I believed in my training and in my theories of ultra running, until the rubber hit the dirt they were just that — theories. Speaking of rubber, I killed some of the time during the week by tweaking my shoes to make them even lighter. In the end, I got them down to 5.5 ounces:-)

On the 18th we headed back to Lake City. Just outside of Woodland Park we saw a big black bear crossing the road in front of us. I took it as a sign — a sign that things were about to get wild. The pasta feed that night was good and the instructions from the RD were short and to the point. No cutting switchbacks, no littering, if lightning comes get off the Divide! Waking up at 3:45am the next morning turned out not to be as big a deal as I had thought simply because I was not sleeping much anyway. We drove the 5 minutes from our hotel to the race start and checked in. I decided against any form of a warm-up figuring that even a minute spent running now might be one less I could run later.

We set off and within 30 seconds Dan Vega and I were being called back on course after we went straight at the first intersection instead of turning right. In our defense we were going to turn right at the next block and were opting for the all dirt option as opposed to the asphalt option. Alas, we turned around and joined back up in the middle of the pack to less than muted laughs. We had the last laugh however because in about 40 seconds we were back at the front and 20 seconds later I was on my own.

The first section went just awesome with most of it spent telling myself to back off the pace. The few times I got my feet wet I could not even feel a weight difference. As planned, near the top of the climb, at the first aid station, I put on my socks. I did this because I learned in my practice run that if a rock gets in your shoes while sockless it hurts a LOT more. I was in and out just a smidge over my self imposed 1 minute aid station limit. This next section is where I got lost on my first practice run. However, because it was race day the course marking were awesome and I could relax and concentrate on my running which made a big difference over my practice runs. Indeed, when I got to the Williams Creek aid station at 2h32 I was 14 minutes ahead of course record pace.

I went through with a planned shoe change from my 5.5 ounce shoes to a 6.5 ounce version with slightly more cushioning. I did this because of the stories of the “rocks” up on the Divide. In hindsight, I should have stuck with the 5.5s. Yvonne and Kyla had enough food set out for about 6 runners and even a towel on the ground to sit on while I changed my shoes. It was great to see them but the visit was short and at about 1 min 30 would be my longest station stop for the day. I drank a BOOST nutritional energy drink for a quick 360 calories and took off. Between the BOOST, the PowerBars I had dissolved in my water bottles and CARB-Boom! energy gels I was hoping to take in 600-700 calories an hour. The actual was more like 350.

The climb to the 3rd aid station at 21 miles was perhaps one of the harder sections of the course for me. Not physically, but mentally. This was a short section and the course record split was 1h04. I was worried that even though the first 15.7 felt easy perhaps I went too fast and now I was going to pay. Only the split time at the aid station could answer the question. When I got to the station in 58 minutes for a total of 3h30 still feeling somewhat fresh I knew that my pacing, although fast, was fine. I had taken another 6 minutes of the CR pace and was now 20 minutes ahead.

I was too fast in one respect however. The aid station was not set up yet because they were not expecting anyone that early. I could not even get water because they could not find the cups. I took my CamelBak and headed off. With the first sip of my PowerBar cocktail I realized I had made a crucial newbie mistake! I had been drinking the dissolved PowerBar mix for months because it tastes great and it works for me. However, I had never pre-made a mix and let it sit as would be done for this “drop bag” aid station. I don’t know what is in a PowerBar to cause this but it smelled like it had fermented and I was able to spit out a bunch of white congealed stuff that looked like (and tasted like) spoiled milk! I shook the mixture to spread out the taste and went from drinking every 10 minutes to every 5 just so I would have to drink less at a time. Not to drink it was not an option at that point. With 9 miles to the next aid station with most of it at 12-13,000 feet I was stuck. I put it out of my m ind.

I had decided before the race that this was the section to do the most damage to the course record. There was just no way 9 miles should take 1h59 as the course record splits indicated. When all was said and done I did the section in 1h44 picking up another 15 minutes and putting me 35 ahead of the record. 31 miles were done, 5h14 had passed and over 8,000 feet of the 12,000 feet of climbing were behind me and I was still feeling great! However, another newbie mistake would come back to haunt me:-( In my quest to shed every once of extra weight I had stuffed my 100oz CamelBak bladder in my 70oz pack. While I was drinking some plain old water from a plain old cup the aid station crew pulled the bladder part way out to fill it . There was no way to get the bladder back in the pack even after we dumped half of it out! With my 1 minute aid station limit coming to an end I headed off carrying just the bladder in my hand. I am sure it looked kinda funny but it worked. The next 4 miles went really well and then the a big rocky downhill to the 40 mile aid station began.

I hated that downhill! It was not so rocky that you could not run fast but just rocky enough that you had to watch every step. This forced a lot of short steps or hops which started to wear on my legs and for the first time I started to feel beat up. It was also getting hotter (82 by some reports) as I went down. Course record split was 1:12 and I managed a 1:04 to come into the 40 mile aid station at 6:18 well ahead of the 7:01 record pace. However, my quads were starting to tire and I told Yvonne that “things were getting ugly.” At the same time, I was charged because I now felt there was a good shot at going under 8. On the other hand, I did not think I could spare even a 30 second stop. I grabbed some water and off I went. I would later learn that everyone had quite the time trying to figure out why I was running with just the bladder of a CamelBak...

Again, the climb from 41 to 44 gains 1,700’. This is the one everyone warned me about. However, to be perfectly honest, I was so happy to stop running downhill I was actually glad to start the climb! Sure, it was hard, but it did not hurt like every step of the downhill was. This was actually some of the best single track on the whole run! I picked up a minute on this section and near the top saw Rick Hessek out taking photos. He told me he thought I had a good shot at sub 8 as well. Next, during a rolling section someone else’s pacer followed me for about a mile. This was kinda nice for a change. However after they stopped I actually gave back a minute on the record during the final 3.5 mile descent. I hit the asphalt thinking it was going to be close. Fortunately, with each step on the road, I felt better and went faster and finished strong in 7:59:44 besting the old course record of 8:43:23.

I was determined not to just stop cold turkey and jogged for about 5 minutes. OK, I also wanted to be able to say I have run for more than 8 hours:-) I then laid down in the shade. Over the next 8 hours I had to throw up about 10 times until I finally felt good again. I am fairly convinced that the bad PowerBar mix was the culprit although I probably went a bit hard the last mile or so shooting for the sub 8. On the other hand, you won’t hear me complain about a bunch of trips to the bathroom because it beats feeling good and having to live with a 8:00:01.

Things Done Right:
1) Went “old school.” In the late 80s and early 90s it was all the rage to tweak our shoes, trim our numbers, cut our tags — whatever it took to shed extra weight. As far as the shoes go its simple math! Lets just use a 10oz shoe, which most would consider a light shoe, as an example. By running with shoes that were 4oz lighter I was saving 1lb every 4 steps. I run with a cadence of 180 steps a minute. That saves me 45lbs a minute. I ran for just about 8 hours or 480 minutes so in the end I saved 21,600lbs!!! Any questions?

2) Training. Did not make the mistake of sacrificing quality for quantity. I found that a really long run (30-40) on the weekend interfered with my Tuesday and Thursday speed sessions. Although I did a few I mostly went with medium long (20-25) runs back to back on Saturday and Sunday. I found I could run them quite a bit harder and yet still run well on Tuesday and Thursday. Also, running the 2nd day with slightly tired legs better simulated late in the race for me than running one longer where I would feel fresh during most of it. Another mistake I avoided was making my speedwork sessions longer. Simply, it isn’t speed if it isn’t fast and you can only do so much fast. I kept my speedwork sessions short and fast. If I wanted more I did them in sets so that I could keep the quality the same in each set.

3) Approach. Instead of viewing the 50 as a long run I viewed it as a short week. In a week, a lot of things can happen. You can have a great Tuesday and a crappy Wednesday. Likewise, in the race, I knew that any bad sections could be followed by good sections. Again, I actually looked forward to the final climb:-) To build on this principle I went 6 plus months with no days under 1.5 hours and most even longer. To do this I had to run when I felt good, bad and ugly — just like what could happen in an ultra. Cool thing is that I believe by doing all the bad and ugly in training I did not have to encounter too much of it in the race:-)

Things Done Wrong:
1) OK- I messed up big time by not pre-testing letting my PowerBar mix sit out overnight.
2) I was just not thinking straight when it took 15 minutes (and 2 people) to shove that 100oz bladder into my 70oz pack the day before the race. Like how was I supposed to refill it? DUH!
3) I may have blown through the 40 mile station too fast. I figured with “only” 10 miles to go it was OK to start going into a food/hydration debt. However, this was a very long 10 miles because of the 1,700’ climb. Had I taken another BOOST could I have made up more time? It’s a delicate balance and at the time I just did not feel anything I did at the station could make up for the lost time spent there. It may have made my post race recovery better but I am thinking most of my stomach issues after the race had to do with mistake #1. Further, because I felt strong once back on the flats, I am thinking I was just out of downhill muscles and not out of running energy. I need more time to think about this one.
4) In hindsight, I should have gotten a pacer for miles 40 to the end which was allowed. I sorta settled into a “just get it done” mentality and had stopped pushing the pace. In fact, the only sections of the last 10 I did with any effort was a mile or so stretch when someone else’s pacer started to run with me and the final mile to the finish where a biker was riding next to me and then a spectator joined in as well.

Any Other Stuff:
Had a great crew in Yvonne and yes, even Kyla. I mean, a towel to sit on while I changed my shoes!!! They thought of everything:-) They were also nice enough to let a few other runners use my station after I had departed. I am very fortunate to have them in my life!

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Kyla Carpenter reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Have fun and chase ants!
Results: Had fun and chased ants, deer and horses!

General Summary:
We woke up VERY early — no idea why — but I was game. I got to sleep in this little bed without fences and that was cool. I fell of of it at night but was gently put back in bed by someone — did not care — did not hurt. So many, many horses, but was not able to touch any of them. They were always busy eating and totally ignored me. I really enjoyed playing and munching on all this food on the back of the car. I saw Dad twice after he ran away from me in Lake City with all these other people. I tried to catch up but he was going too fast. The first time I saw him again, I tried to fill his bottle but it tasted funny so i started experimenting with some sand to improve the taste and when I looked, he was gone. Next time I saw him, I was making sure the cookies were still good from the trip — they could have spoiled as you know. I sat on his towel and made him a pile of rocks in case he wanted to play a little. I was told he was going to come by any minute. I saw him run towards me and off he went. Mummy held me by the arm and did not let me run after him, not sure why. I was very upset.

Things Done Right:
-Kept very hydrated
-Was in total control of my toy horses and Cow
-Got to drink pink milk

Things Done Wrong:
- Was unable to catch Dad every time I saw him
- Was unable to touch any horses I saw on those 3 days

Any Other Stuff:
I wish they would install a horse swing in the park in Manitou — I really enjoyed swinging on that one in Lake City. Go Daddy Go!

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Yvonne Carpenter reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Be at the aid stations at the right time!
Results: Was at the aid stations way ahead of time!

General Summary:
Kyla and I were the crew team for Matt on the lake City 50 miler. Even though the race lasted ~8 hours for us, it went by real fast. Too bad we can only see the runners in 2 spots, but it was exciting to see the transformation on their attitude and disposition as the miles went by!

Things Done Right:
-Scooped the area the weekend before and knew exactly where to be and when to be there.
-Managed to keep Kyla from being run over (both aid stations were right by the highway)
-Had all the necessary gear/food available
-parked very close to the main course (who needs to run a few extra yards in a 50 miler!)
-covered Kyla with sun tan lotion, head to toe

Things Done Wrong:
- Did not cover my self with sun tan lotion (got very sunburned)
- Did not wear a hat (got my scalp sun burned!)

Any Other Stuff:
We catered Matt on mile 15.7 and 40. Matt got to the first aid station several minutes ahead of what he told me. He did do as planned though, sitting down, changing shoes and drinking some Boost. All very fast, and off he went. On Mile 40, things were different, even though he was still way ahead of time! He was supposed to relax and drink more Boost and eat something, refill with water + powerbar mix then continue. He literally flew by, tossed the insert of a camelback (don’t ask!) in the car, grabbed a plain bottle of water and off he went. Could not have been more than a 3-second-stop. Oh yeah, he did say something as he went by: “Things are getting ugly!.” We saw him again at the finish for the “puke” fest! It was awesome to be there and see him pull this off! Way to go Poo!

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Todd Murray reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Finish (hopefully under 12 hours)
Results: 11:55

General Summary:
A tough race I did last year and wanted to try again this year on less training. Very good trails, lots of elevation, beautiful scenery.

Things Done Right:
Trained enough to get through it. Took in enough calories and hydrated well enough through the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t really complain here.

Any Other Stuff:
I have to think this is one of the tougher 50’s out there. It sure feels like one!

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Rick Pearcy/ Kim Kitchen report:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: 15 hours
Results: 14:54

General Summary:
Great course: breath-taking vistas, multiple snow fields, beautiful flower-covered meadows, very cold stream crossings, and 12,000+ feet of climbing.

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Mount Washington Road Race - Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire - June 19, 2004

Paul Kirsch reports:
Distance: 7.6 Miles up the auto road
Goal: break 1:30
Results: 1:25:05
Website: http://www.gsrs.com

General Summary:
This is my 6th time running the race up the auto road. For those who don’t know it, the race goes up the 7.6 mile auto road at an average of an 11.5% grade. The first three times I had miserable times all above 1:50. Then the race shortened year and then last year I did a 1:38. I have always felt like I should be able to break 1:30 and that was my goal this year.

Conditions were perfect for me-- it was about 60 and light rain at the start and above treeline it got windier and windier with peak gusts of around 55 mph during the last 1.5 miles. Visibility during the last 2 miles was down to about 10-20 feet.

Things Done Right:
I did 6 training runs on the road this year. I went up to mile 6 twice, mile 5 three times and mile 4 once.

I changed to a more rigid run-walk strategy this year, forcing myself to walk for one minute at a time, at a minimum of once a mile after mile one. This allowed me time to recover more so than previous years when I would only walk for 10 to 20 seconds.

I stuck to my split times I did in training runs. I wrote them on my arm and even when I had the urge to go a little faster in the first 4 miles, I stuck to my plan. That left me a lot more strength for the last 3 miles.

The last thing I have to say helped me this year was I’m about 10 pounds lighter than last year, some of which I attribute to running on snowshoes 6 days a week this whole winter. It kept in better shape when it was time to run trails again.

Things Done Wrong:
Looking back, I wished I had pushed it a little more in the last couple of miles and broken 1:25 but that was all gravy at that point. Something to shoot for for next year

Any Other Stuff:
It was cool to have the race be a USATF Mt. Championship and a Teva Mountain Running Team qualifier. What other sport do you get to run in the same race as 20 or so of the greatest mountain runners in the country?

Jonathan Wyatt of New Zealand smashed the old course record with a time of 56:41. It was incredible to think what he might do without the brutal winds in the last couple of miles.

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29th Hampden 8 1/2 mile Road Race - Hampden, Maine - Sunday June 13, 2004

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 8 1/2 miles
Goal: To go under 8 minute miles.
Results: 8:50 miles (75 minutes)
Website: N/A (tel: 207 223 4715)

General Summary:
Typical small town annual race. Hot, long and great, just like the old days of the pre ‘80’s. Where else can you pay $8 bucks, get splits every mile, water and a measured course — plus a tee shirt ... Luv it!

Things Done Right:
Got to see my twins at various points on the course. Otherwise not well prepared.

Things Done Wrong:
Just about everything, which is the way it is when you go somewhere without a specific race in mind, in a vacation mode!

Any Other Stuff:
All paved, basically square loop course, encompassing the small country town of Hampden, Maine. Start and finish at a local High School, who made bathrooms and showers available to all. Typically, a small field, but the quality quite high. Very hilly, and unfortunately the uphills seemed to be looong, and the downhills steep and shooort!

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Holcomb Valley 33 Mile Trail Run - Big Bear CA - June 13, 2004

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 33 miles
Goal: 8 hours
Results: about 8 hours, 20 minutes

General Summary:
After a lot of races, I usually feel a big let down, so I thought entering a shorter race the weekend after SP50 might off set this funk, of PMS, (post marathon syndrome). It didn’t.

Things Done Right:
Forced myself to finish even though I didn’t want to.
Also brought two water bottles. Again it was hot, mid-nineties, and on rocky climbing and descending trails, often secluded from any breeze, which helped bring out the aroma of the all to frequent bear crap on and along the trails.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t have my heart in it from the start. I could have done the race a lot “quicker,” but still found myself tired from the 50 miler the weekend before.

Any Other Stuff:

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Squaw Peak 50 mile Trail Run - Wasatch mountains outside of Orem, UT - June 5, 2004

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Finish under 15 hours
Results: 14:38:26

General Summary:
SP 50 is unofficially ranked as the third hardest 50 in the country. Lots of misbehaved rocks, the occasional bear and/or mountain lion, and numerous climbs and descents and bushwacking and unexpected lightening storms make each year unique.

Things Done Right:
Took my Hammer Gel, was well-organized, didn’t bring too much stuff in my drop bags so that I wouldn’t waste time at the aid stations, over all kept things really simple. It was a little hot this year,(mid-nineties) so I remembered to hydrate early on, and push earlier in the day when it was cooler.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have taken more water on the 1300 foot ascent that happens in less than a mile. Everyone runs out of water here. The spring at the aid station after you reached the top was running much slower than normal, so I and half a dozen others had to wait until the volunteers could get water jugs filled. Lost about ten minutes.

Any Other Stuff:
About half a dozen snow fields which were nice and slick, followed by lots of mud and slippery rocks made for a “fun” final ten miles to the finish.

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Casper Marathon - Casper, WY - June 6, 2004

Casper Marathon - Casper, WY - June 6, 2004
Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal:
Results: 4th in 3:15
Website: http://www.runwyoming.com

General Summary:
This years race in Casper was much hotter then last year. The temperature at the finish was in the 80’s! The changed the course a bit to finish in the new baseball park that they have. This was nice because you could walk back to the hotel instead of hitch a ride on the shuttle. The thing that made it tougher was that we had to go out farther on the bike path. There just happens to be a huge hill at the new turn around (we did not go that far last year).

Things Done Right:
Went out slow (1:38) and carried my own water and food due to the increased heat. I was able to negative split (1:38, 1:37) and pass 10 people in the last half without picking up the pace!

Things Done Wrong:
DIdn’t drink enough sports drink. Due to the increased heat, I should have been drinking all sports drink instead of my normal sports drink every 3rd stop. I should have filled my water bottle with sports drink instead of H2O. This would have helped my recovery. Also drove from Casper to Littleton without stopping to stretch my legs. Just wanted to get home, and I paid for it the next day.

Any Other Stuff:
The Casper Marathon is still on of the best run little marathons in the country. I highly recommend it to anyone looking to get a good 26.2 miles in.

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Steamboat Springs 1/2 Marathon - Steamboat Springs - June 6, 2004

Kate Raphael reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2:00:00
Results: 1:55:18
Website: http://www.Steamboat-chamber.com/events/marathon.htm

General Summary:
Beautiful scenery, gentle rolling hills with net elevation loss of 260 feet. The temperature was perfect for running, however quite cold prior to race starting.

Things Done Right:
Kept a steady pace, worked on the hills.

Things Done Wrong:
Caught the first bus to the start, getting me there an hour before race time. Expended too much energy shivering, as did not bring appropriate warm-up clothing.

Any Other Stuff:
The race was well organized. Cold wet towels at the finish were a nice touch.

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Hospital Hill Half Marathon - Kansas City, Missouri - June 5, 2004

Beverly Weaver reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2:36
Results: 2:34:06
Website: http://www.hospitalhillrun.com

General Summary:
This race is known for its hills and the possible heat and humidity. They also have a 5K and 12K race at the same time.

Things Done Right:
Trained long and on hills. Went out easy and felt great at the end.

Things Done Wrong:
Need to run more mileage during the week and increase the speed work if I want to cut my time to something respectable.

Any Other Stuff:
This race is fun and well-conducted. There are water stops (some with PowerAde) almost every mile. Everyone complains about the hills except those of us who run steeper hills every day.
Darrell and I had a bet with another couple that we could beat them (combined times), which we did. They bought the lunch after the race....

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Darrell Weaver reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: something under 1:45
Results: 1:42:38
Website: http://hospitalhillrun.com

General Summary:
A 30 year-old race that is very well organized. Constant rolling hills, 800-1000 ft. altitude. Heat and humidity is usually a factor (this year it was 70-75 temp. and high but not outrageous humidity)

Things Done Right:
Followed what I understand to be Matt’s approach to hill running (rapid cadence consistently maintained on ups, downs, and flats). This paid off.

Things Done Wrong:
I’m woefully undertrained so I didn’t have high hopes (something around an 8 minute pace). Still, I was somewhat disappointed that I lost steam from mile 10 or so. Need to put in more miles and some speed work.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a pretty cool race. ICers looking for a low altitude flatland race with hills should check this out.

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Newport Marathon - Newport, Oregon - June 5, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Under 2:50
Results: 2:50:10, 5th overall
Website: http://www.newportmarathon.org/

General Summary:
I took a week in the Pacific Northwest with the goal of adding another marathon state (Oregon) and climbing two more state highpoints: Mt Rainier of Washington State and Mt Hood of Oregon. I was successful with a solo summit climb of Mt Rainier Tuesday, June 1st, round trip time from Paradise Inn (ele 5500 feet) of 11 hours, nearly 9,000 feet elevation gain, all on snow or glacier. By Wednesday I was feeling the effects though and decided that if I wanted to run a good marathon on Saturday I had better save Mt Hood for another time.

Things Done Right:
Climbed only one serious mountain that week.
Started off slowly and accelerated through the middle of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran the last mile over seven minutes.

Any Other Stuff:
Flat, sea level, PR course. Excellent small town marathon. Newport has a quaint historic waterfront. The course goes through town for 4-5 miles then is an out and back along Yaquina Bay Road. Very scenic.

Got beat by a 63 year old Canadian who ran 2:47.

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Camp As Sayliyah Patriot Run - Camp As Sayliyah, Doha, Qatar - May 31, 2004

Karl Schab reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: run
Results: ran

General Summary:
Army Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) organizes a 5K or 10K (or both) most holiday weekends. This was an out-and-back around the heavily-guarded perimeter of Camp As Sayliyah. My first run with automatic weapons and guard towers guarding the course. 5:30 show and 6 am go, but the sun has already been up for almost two hours by then--Qatar does not observe daylight savings time. Temp was well into the 90s.

Things Done Right:
Dragged my sorry butt out of bed to go for a run. Oh, and I drank plenty of water.

Things Done Wrong:
I copped an attitude when I got recalled to active duty, because I’m going to miss the PPA/M, and have only managed to run about once a week, and never more than a 5K. It certainly showed today. It was my slowest 5K ever, and I was not prepared. Oh, well, call it the start of a more focused training regimen--on a treadmill in an air-conditioned gym, I hope.

Any Other Stuff:
Any ICers who want to follow my time on active duty can read my “blog” at http://windmir.blogspot.com.

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Rocky Mtn double marathon - Laramie, WY - May 30, 2004

Daiva Cooper reports:
Distance: 52.4 miles
Goal: to finish
Results: 37 miles
Website: http://

General Summary:
Out and back marathon course in Medicine Bow Natl Forest and Vedauwoo plus a nasty little 2 mile stretch on a highway frontage road. Beautiful course except for the road section.

Things Done Right:
1. Paced myself well for the first marathon
2. Hooked up with some other runners when the wind got really nasty to push each other through until the more sheltered part of the run
3. Continued to eat gels when I couldn’t stomach anything else

Things Done Wrong:
1. Did not carry enough warm clothing. When the weather turned from 45 degrees with a light wind to 40 mph winds and a windchill below zero, I became hypothermic. Could not re-establish my core body temperature and my stomach shut down, etc. causing my dnf.
2. Bring warm food for my crew to make — soup, hot chocolate would have been great!

Any Other Stuff:
Truly is a beautiful course. Very windy, so be prepared for that!

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Rye by the Sea - Rye, NH - May 29th, 2004

Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: PR since it is sea level
Results: PR 46:20
Website: http://www.ryebythesea.org

General Summary:
Since we were traveling and wanted to get our star, we found a race in New Hampshire to do on vacation. The course was all road, very flat except for 1 hill, but windy as hell. The big event of the day was a duathlon, but we opted for the 10k.

Things Done Right:
Well, it being only a 10k I don’t know if there is too much to write about. Just go out and run hard and hope you can hold it:)

Things Done Wrong:
I may have been able to finish stronger if I had went out slower. Always my weakness, I go out way too fast, especially on shorter races.

Any Other Stuff:

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Goal: sub 40:00
Results: 38:45

General Summary:
We were in New Hampshire for a wedding and thought that it would be nice to run a local race. This is a beautiful part of the country and nice small town for an event like this. There is a 5k, 10k, and duathlon.

Things Done Right:
I ran a very consistent pace. I was relaxed and just tried to enjoy the run.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing that I can think of.

Any Other Stuff:
This course is a loop starting in town and heading out by the sea and heading down the coast for a few miles before heading back to the start. I had envisioned a beautiful run along side the beach, but instead there is a retaining wall along the beach and you really cannot see the ocean at all. :( With about a mile to go I passed someone and thought that I might have to sprint the final 1/2 mile to keep him from passing me. Then we came upon a hill and I thought that if I could maintain my pace up the hill I would have it and sure enough he fell back.

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Stu Nevermann Memorial Run XV - Mason City, Iowa - May 29, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 5 Miles *(shortened to 4 this year due to flooding)
Goal: participate, run easy
Results: 20th overall and 1st in age group with a 27:09

General Summary:
This is an annual event in memory of young runner and acquaintance of mine, Stu Nevermann. His father began this event the year following Stu’s unexpected death. It has traditionally been a free entry yet has attracted excellent participant’s every year. The 5 mile course record is 24:54!

Things Done Right:
There is probably nothing “right” about running a 5 mile race the week following my first 50K. But if anything was right it was that I have run in every Stu Nevermann race since I returned to Mason City in 1991. This was my 14th of the 15 annual Stus. I did stay back from my traditional starting pace and tried to ease through the distance to keep from injuring tired muscles.

Things Done Wrong:
See above!

Any Other Stuff:
Rain storms this year caused concern for the runners’ safety. Runoff from an early morning storm caused 4-5 inches of flow across the furthest reaches of the course and forced the directors to shorten the distance this year to 4 miles. Lightning caused a half hour delay to the start.

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Superior Trail 25 and 50K Races - Lutsen, Minnesota - May 22, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: 4:45 to 5:00 hours (due to difficulty of the course and past results of others)
Results: 5:28
Website: http://www.superiortrailrace.com

General Summary:
The 50K race starts at the Caribou Highlands Lodge in Lutsen. The course has everything from scenic overlooks to dense maple forests. The trail winds through boreal forests of birch, spruce, balsam fir and alder as the it climbs to the top of Moose Mountain. A lot of ups and downs make this a very challenging section to run. This is one of the toughest sections of the Superior Hiking Trail and caution must be observed. The oldest section of the Superior Hiking Trail is at the gorge of Poplar River. From Oberg Mountain to Sawbill Trail you have rolling paths through maple and birch forests. Wet and seasonally wet ground is typical along this section. The stretch from the second water stop to the 50K turnaround is rather rocky with a good steady climb up then back.

The race began under cloudy and rather cool conditions. It had rained the previous day so there were some areas that were wet and puddled. The 1st hour and a half to two hours were quite good conditions for footing and weather, however, rain began and the final 2/3rds of the race were wet and cold! What had been fun in the beginning became a cruel joke later. Some of the low areas were a quagmire and the boardwalks and log crossings were very slick.

No one came in with any serious injuries although many had taken some spills and the war stories of the day’s races were very interesting. Good memories overall!!

Things Done Right:
This was my initial attempt at this distance so I started rather conservatively (although I learned by the end that I was still a little too aggressive at the start) and tried to listen to others around me to gauge their level of experience. I was able to make rather steady, forward progress and used extreme caution when the conditions became wet and slippery.

Things Done Wrong:
Chose a very difficult course for my first 50K.

As is often the case, I believe I could have trained a bit better, more long runs, e.g.

Continued to prepare for this race even though I struggled with Achilles tendonitis and some lower back problems.

Any Other Stuff:
While training in Colorado, in the past, I have learned to be a rather aggressive downhill runner. Unfortunately, at Superior, that aspect of my race was negated by the weather. It would have been very foolhardy to have run the downhills aggressively on the day of this race.

I still enjoyed the experience and will likely look forward to trying the distance again with the intent of improving my time. (Note: I’m saying this 4 days after the event. Immediately after my finish I would not have offered a prayer of trying a 50K again.)

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Bay to Breakers - San Francisco, CA - May 16, 2004

Jackie Burhans reports:
Distance: 7.8 miles
Goal: Finish upright
Results: Finished. Stayed upright til later that afternoon.
Website: http://www.baytobreakers.com

General Summary:
Annual trek to Northern California for running, vacation and family. Jasper is getting pretty big for the baby jogger.

Things Done Right:
Continuing to train despite diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee. Lots on a treadmill, some with Incline Club on individualized GOG runs.
Remembered to bring safety pins for race number since they don’t give you any. Walked from end of race down to beginning of MUNI line so no big crowds to fight on light rail system.

Things Done Wrong:
Apparently NOT trained enough for this distance since it hurt. Knees held up pretty well but hips and back were terribly sore that evening. Next day, OK.
Waited too long to pick up race packets and they’d run out of youth shirts for Jasper. Forgot to bring Baby Jogger custom duffle bag which makes it awkward to haul Baby Jogger back on light rail.

Any Other Stuff:
Most amusing bit: Official announcement that nudity was discouraged and that while they would not pull people off the course to cite, they would cite you if you crossed the finish line nude. Result: More nekkid butts than ever before and lovely photo in paper next day of cop looking the other way.

Least amusing bit: No apparent effort by race organizers to get walkers to walk on the right while runners run on the left (or vice versa). I could swear I remembered them doing this previously. Although this is not the race on which to make a PR, having to wait behind 49,417 people until someone notices and moves or you dash around them is, well, tiresome.

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24 hours of Boulder — relay - Boulder Reservoir - May 15-16, 2004

Daiva Cooper reports:
Distance: 24 hours
Goal: see how far we could get as a team
Results: 3rd place in 5-person team division
Website: http://www.geminiadventures.com

General Summary:
The 24 hours of Boulder is run on a 7.14 mile course at the Boulder Reservoir. Solo runners as well as teams of up to 5 people were competing to see how far they could run in 24 hours. The course was basically flat and mostly run on a dirt/gravel path with some singletrack and some road. We ran 22 laps for a total of 157.08 miles.

Things Done Right:
1. Ate and drank enough between laps to stay well fueled
2. Ran with 2 lights on my night leg: one headlamp and a smaller handheld flashlight
3. Had fun with my team

Things Done Wrong:
1. Don’t do squats at the gym 2 days before the race — I had some leg cramping after the first lap which was finally relieved after 1/2 hour of stretching

Any Other Stuff:
Relays are so much fun! It was interesting to watch the solo runners as the event wore on.

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FTC Old Town Marathon - FTC, CO - May 9, 2004

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Get the state
Results: 3:13

General Summary:
Ran this as an easy run to get the state. Can you believe I live in CO and hadn’t run a marathon here yet?

Temperatures got to be very hot once we came out of the canyon. They needed more H2O stops in the beginning.

Ran a very smart run knowing the temps were hot. 1:40/1:33 negative spilt.

Very good race for anyone looking for a local marathon in the spring.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:

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Pilot Knob Trail Race - Forest City, Iowa / Pilot Knob State Park - May 8, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 15K
Goal: Maintain my status as a top 5 finisher here/ dress rehearsal for Superior Trail 50K
Results: 7th overall/4th Male/ 1st in age group (over 50)
Website: http://www.pilotknobtrailrace.com

General Summary:
Very beautiful and challenging course in a state park. I started the race rather aggressively but quickly settled into a slower, funky mode as I am truly trying to look ahead a couple weeks at a 50K trail race. Chris Jensen, U of Iowa runner, took off with a very quick pace and eventually set a new course record at 55 minutes! He was followed fairly closely by a couple of younger high school/college aged runners but they both missed a turn and ended up off course by quite a ways. Ahead of me, local TV weatherman, Jonathon Conder, seemed to be having a great race and another 40ish man was running well, also. 5 mile winner from 2002, Marty Sprague, ran beside me for many miles but began to fade slightly as we continued. The top women runners passed me midway through the race and I mentally struggled with how much effort I was willing to expend on the day. I resigned myself to watching their race and being satisfied to run as smoothly as possible and not get hurt. All in all, it was a great day to run and it see ms everyone enjoyed the conditions.

Things Done Right:
Used the race to check out some new running shorts from Salomon before attempting a 50K in two weeks.

Ran (hopefully, at a 50K sustainable pace?) within myself. Let a few runners go that I typically stay with competitively.

Things Done Wrong:
Succumbed to attendance at a celebration the evening before that included free beer and Mexican cuisine. Not the best approach for feeling competitive the next morning.

Any Other Stuff:
Over 9.3 miles of incredible dirt, and grass trails that wind you through a beautiful forest in Pilot Knob State Park. Twice you run up and around the “knob” which is the second highest area in Iowa with an elevation of 1450ft. This course goes over stone bridges, through twists and turns, up and down inclines and declines of all angles. There is water or lemon lime Gatorade every 1.50-2 miles. Every mile, and the 5 and 10 kilometer locations were marked. This course is as accurate as possible as they have measured the course with a measuring wheel.

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Na Holo Wahine - Maui, Hawaii - May 8, 2004

Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: Ultimate=sub 20; Realistic=between 20 & 21
Results: 20:42 (2nd overall
Website: http://www.virr.com

General Summary:
This is Maui’s only all women 5K event. Between 70 and 80 women participated. It was a beautiful Maui day, but extremely hot to run in. We got great shirts and they had some excellent door prizes.

Things Done Right:
Tom and I did some strength training by running hill surges once a week. Otherwise, we are on Maui-time and enjoying the slower pace!

Things Done Wrong:
I haven’t run any short/fast races for a long time. I think that is one of the best ways to run fast 5Ks is to enter more 5K races.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was on road thru the cultural/educational/ harbor part of Wailuku. We started near the Maui Botanical Gardens and ran thru a pretty park. Then we were out in the open under the sun for the rest; along the harbor and about a mile uphill to the finish. Tom volunteered and wore his “I Love Fast Women” t-shirt. Everyone got a kick out of that!
We’re planning a trip to the mainland in August. Hope to see many of you then!

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South Miami Beach Race - South Miami Beach - May 3, 2004

Linda Ronas reports:
Distance: ~ 8 miles
Goal: win
Results: lost

General Summary:
I found myself in somewhat of a dilemma before this race because I was headed to Miami for business on Saturday and would be working from Sunday — Friday. I wanted to maintain my perfect “*” streak but could not find a race in Miami that would be held on Sunday or Monday evenings — go figure. So, I decided to race a fellow runner attending the conference since I was determined not to let my business trip interfere with my Incline club workouts.

After talking with numerous conference attendees, I engaged Rebecca Sheehan in a friendly beach race (where else do you run when in Miami, right?) This was convenient since our hotel was 200 yards from the ocean. Anyway, we hooked up Monday evening out by the Loews pool, which looked VERY inviting given the 80 degrees and 75% humidity (oops, I might accidentally fall in). We stepped out onto the beach and discussed what our course would be. Looking both north and south revealed two lines of rocks that extend out into the ocean, I think to break waves (what are those called again??) Come to find out, the south destination ended where cruise ships dock; the north at the 29th street lifeguard “hut.” After drawing a “finish line” in the sand, Rebecca and I started off running south, turned around after reaching the rocks and then headed north. We again turned around at the lifeguard station until reaching the finish line (thankfully no one had erased it).

During the race I realized several things: 1-I don’t want to live in Miami. Humidity may make your complexion feel wonderful, but the other impacts stink. 2-Beach running is hard. I felt like I was moving in slow motion. 3-I should have picked a different opponent. :-) Here was probably the only time I could actually win a race but alas, it was not meant to be. Rebecca crossed the finish line a good 1/2 mile ahead of me. Oh well.

Things Done Right:
Had water with me. How do all those other beach runners do it with nothing to drink? Wasn’t going to but wore a singlet (you know — modesty). It came in handy to wipe the endless supply of sweat out of my eyes.

Things Done Wrong:
In my haste to be on time, I forgot my watch. I also wasn’t hydrated well enough since I was out of my normal routine.

Any Other Stuff:
I don’t know if this report will count as a *, but I hope so. My goal this year is to attend every Sunday run, which I have done. While not a “sanctioned” race, I am glad that I followed through on my commitment of Sunday runs. In the end that’s what really counts.

But the * would be nice.....

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Adidas Vancouver International Marathon - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada - May 2, 2004

Steve Sargeant reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: PR — 4:03 and sub 4 hours
Results: 3:59:40
Website: http://www.adidasvanmarathon.ca/hm/

General Summary:
A heck of a day in Vancouver. They announced at the start line that it was the largest marathon in Canadian history with 5,100 entrants. The website says there were only 4,300 who finished before the cut-off time. I saw some carnage on the road but not 800 people worth of carnage.

I was doing 10 and 1s (run 10 minutes, power walk for 1 minute). So at 7:30, me and my Incline Club shirt took off. It was 1:15 to get to the start line. The first half was pretty smooth except for a 9:14 first mile and a 8:16 at mile 11. Halfway was 1:55:54 on my watch. Running through Stanley Park was great especially when someone said to their running partner in a slightly hushed tone, “He ran Pikes Peak. I’ll never do that!” After that ego boost, I picked it up a bit since I was down 35 seconds or so. I was exactly on my split at mile 16 and was still feeling fresh (fresh for mile 16). Going over Burrard St Bridge the first time was not as bad as I thought it might be. The run out to Kitsilano was nastier and longer than I was mentally prepared for so that took a bit of starch out of me but I hadn’t faded more than 30 seconds by mile 20. I had a pit stop at the turn around and realized how tired my legs were. Nonetheless, I tried to hang with some tall dude who was cruising along at a good pace. At mile 22, I took my last walk break and announced to myself (out loud, of course) “No more walking, suck it up and go!” The guy next to me laughed and started running with me. As we got back near the bridge, I knew it was a little more than 2 miles to go and one mile was all uphill so I tried a new trick. I imagined I was on the long north to south switchback above treeline on Pikes Peak. I put my head down, put it in climbing gear and ignored the ambulance loading up someone on the bridge. The sun came out at the end of the bridge. The final mile was rough because I knew I had a PR in my pocket (previous best 4:03) but 4 hours was going to be REALLY close. To be honest, I don’t remember much of the last mile except that I almost puked at 25.8 miles. Even when I was in the finishing stretch, I couldn’t estimate if I had time to get there because that finishing stretch is so damn long. My friend who ran the half and his wife were 3/4 of the way down the finishing stretch with m y digital camera but I was sooo close to my time that I didn’t even slow down for a picture. Me and the guy next to me had our arms raised even though the clock read 4:01:55. Got it. 3:59:40 chip time.

Things Done Right:
Brenda isn’t the only person who is benefiting from weight loss. Getting down to 185 lbs definitely made a difference because my training hasn’t been so great as to expect a new PR. I was 200 lbs when I weighed myself on Dec 27 in Colorado Springs. Running in a big crowd was a new experience too. It probably helped me through the middle of the race because I knew who was fading and started picking them off.

Things Done Wrong:
On the flip side, I got passed a lot over the last three miles and I am definitely missing my hill climbing gears. My training needs more hills.

Any Other Stuff:
Beautiful, beautiful course in one of my favorite cities. Excellent running weather at sea level and the race is very well organized. I highly recommend this race for an early season marathon or half-marathon. Great FINISHER shirt and a nice medal.

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Lincoln Marathon - Lincoln, NE - May 2, 2004

Andy Cullan reports:
Distance: 26.2 m
Goal: To Finish
Results: right at 4 hrs
Website: http://www.lincolnrun.org/marathon.htm

General Summary:
Race course starts on the University of NE campus and does to separate loops around the city through some of the older residential parts of Lincoln. The course is fairly flat (compared to Barr Trail) running on streets and sidewalks.

Things Done Right:
Food and water intake were done well, stretched well and warmed up pretty good before the race. Alternated between water and all sport at the aid stations. By the end of the race, I felt like I licked a sugar bowl.

Things Done Wrong:
This is hard to guage, being my first marathon. Training on trails makes it harder to transition to a harder surface (sidewalks and streets). I think I could have pushed myself harder, but that is a limit that is being explored.

Any Other Stuff:
Course was well marked, lots of spectators, great aid stations, very well organized and plenty of police support at the busy intersections. The volunteers did a great job.

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Collegiate Peaks Trail Run - Buena Vista, CO - May 1, 2004

Laura Mitchell reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Complete 50 miles
Results: Completed 51 miles!
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org/

General Summary:
This is the most beautiful trail I have ever run! The race starts at the Buena Vista Community center and is a trail/jeep trail route on a 25.5 mile loop back to the community center. There are spectacular views of Mt. Massive, and Elbert almost the entire race. Those running the 25.5 mile race stop after one loop. Those running the 51 miles can either stop at 25.5 or complete another loop. The race committee generously added .5 miles to the 25 mile loop so that we could get more bang for our buck! The aid stations are located every 3 to 6 miles. Aid is Gatorade, water, bananas, orange slices, pretzels, and cookies. The aid station volunteers were friendly and encouraging. The trail is rolling hills, and soft to run on.

Things Done Right:
I ran conservatively and remained comfortable. I drank plenty of fluid, and ate every chance I got. I took Snickers Marathon bars and nibbled on those (very yummy power bar). I ran with Gina, another ICer, almost the entire race. It helped me tremendously to have another person to run with. We chatted, stayed relaxed, and enjoyed the run. Gina took first place overall, and I took second. My unofficial time was 9 hours 49 minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
I didn’t pack any Carb Boom. It became difficult to eat dry food like pretzels and cookies.

Any Other Stuff:
My family was there cheering and taking pictures. They even greeted me on the trail the last few miles. That was a huge boost for me to finish!

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Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: To finish my first 50
Results: 9:37:19-1st overall woman
Website: http://www.collegiatepeakstrailrun.org

General Summary:
What a beautiful, great race! The snow had fallen the night before, but the morning brought beautiful blue skies and great running weather. The course was a 25 mile loop that you did clockwise first, then counter clockwise for the second loop. The course is generally uphill the first half of the loop and downhill the second half, no matter which way you are going. The approximate elevation gain is 3,300 ft. It is great to end the last 10 miles on a nice downhill. That is, of course, until you come to the pavement for the last couple miles (ouch)! Beautiful views of the 14ers around Buena Vista. Great friendly aid stations. Great race.

Things Done Right:
Laura Mitchell and I ran together until the last 5-6 miles. We went out easy because neither of us had ran a 50. We walked all the steep hills, and ran the downhills. I ate and drank often and alot.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
There is also the 25 mile option. If you sign up for the 50, and decide 25 is good enough, they will still give you a 25 mile finish time. It would be great if they would start the 50s a couple hours early so that we can all enjoy the post race party and awards ceremony together.

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Whiskey Row Marathon - Prescott, AZ - May 1, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Long training run
Results: 1st @ 3:05
Website: http://www.prescottymca.com

General Summary:
John Hughes, his wife Melanie and I drove up to Prescott the night before. Before doing so we had dinner with Linds at an Israeli Restaurant in Tempe. It was very good except that I had bowel issues due to the food. Melanie had a good friend that has a place in Prescott that was out of town. So we stayed at their place the night before the race.

We woke up at 4:30am for the 6am start. After messing around we didn’t get much of a warm up before the start. The gun started and we began with perfect 40 degree weather. I followed Drew, last year’s winner, at the beginning of the race. I noticed right away that he was breathing hard and felt he was probably going out too hard. We left everyone else as Drew started pushing the hills. I ran very comfortably directly behind him for a few miles. Then I started having biological issues and had to stop to relieve myself. After doing so I continued up the course.

The course runs on pavement a little while before turning to dirt roads. The first part of the course is extremely hilly and then it begins climbing in earnest at mile 3. From mile 3 to 9 1/2 the course climbs to a high mountain pass and then drops back down on the other side to the turn around.

Drew was pretty much out of sight after relieving myself. I decided to let him go and catch him later on as I didn’t think he could hold the pace that he was setting. I took it easy to the top of the pass and then back down to the turnaround. On my way down I had another biological episode. I was passed by a runner behind me. After finishing I passed him back immediately and continued down. I noticed at the turnaround that Drew was about 4 minutes ahead of me. Then I said to myself, “Ok, it is time to start racing.” After the turnaround (1:37) while passing John and a couple other folks, John looked surprised at me and said, “Jonathan, you have a lot of work to do now!” I told him that I knew I did and picked up the pace substantially. I pushed hard up the backside of the mountain. Towards the top of the pass there was a clearing and my suspicions were confirmed when I saw that Drew was probably only 2 minutes ahead of me. I pushed even harder to the top. Then attacking the downhill I just waited for Drew to come into site again. Then it happened I saw Drew just as he went around the bend. I relaxed a little knowing that most of the work had been done and that all that was let was putting the race away. Passing the turnaround for the half marathon I saw Drew again. I was a little surprised how slow Drew was running as I passed by. It seems that his effort in the first half of the course was taking it’s toll. I continued to run strong to the 3 mile to go. Started to feel fatigued during the hilly last 3 miles. I kept telling myself this hill is the last one, but it never was. Finally I came back into town. I pushed hard up the last hill to the former state capitol building and made a left onto the finishing stretch. Went across the finish line at 3:05:05. Drew finished at 3:11. John had a good race and came in 5th at 3:16.

Interviewed with the radio and local paper afterwards. You can see the article at http://www.communitypapers.com/DAILYCOURIER/viewsearchresults.asp?infoid=121490852&moduleid=18304507&current

Things Done Right:
Good race strategy and hydration

Things Done Wrong:
Very little warmup. Ate out to eat the night before.

Any Other Stuff:
Huge trophy and free shoes for the winner.

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Wild Wild West Marathon and 50km - Lone Pine, CA - May 1, 2004

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 km
Goal: 7 1/2 hours
Results: 7 hours 15 minutes/first place female 30-39

General Summary:
The WWW is considered the 7th toughest marathon in the USA. It is run in the foothills of Mt. Whitney, in what are called the Alabama Hills. The Alabamas are composed of huge, worn granite boulders and slabs, kind of like GOG, but there are lots more of them, and they are much more old than the jagged Sierras. It is run primarily on dirt road and sandy and rocky trails, with lots of descending and ascending. The race really lives up to its name, especially with all the rattle snakes I saw.

Things Done Right:
Really got to know the course. I helped mark it for 18 hours, with chalk and ribbons. Despite my best efforts, there were a few places where the chalk was erased, but still only about 8 people got lost. Considering there were about 200 runners on a windy marathon, I guess this isn’t too bad. I also actually ran some of the downhill sections, and fueled properly during the first half of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I still think I could have gone out harder during the middle section of the race, and could have done this under 7 hours. I need to do speed work too. Since being away from the IC Thursday night speed workouts, I definitely notice a difference in my marathon time.

Any Other Stuff:

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Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon - Oklahoma City - April 25, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 m
Goal: 2:49
Results: 2:57
Website: http://www.okcmarathon.com/

General Summary:

Drove out to Oklahoma City on Thursday and Friday accompanied by some pretty severe weather, from snow in Western OK to driving thunderstorms and hail nearer to the city. By Saturday morning the weather had cleared and it was perfect conditions through the marathon on Sunday.

Following 168 seconds of silence to remember the victims of the Federal Building bombing of 1995 I lined up on the starting line with Dick Beardsley who was running a two-man relay with his partner Bill Rodgers. Frank Shorter was there too as a speaker, but was recovering from an injury and didn’t run. Let me tell you, if you have the chance to ever see Dick Beardsley speak DO IT! The guy is phenomenal. His life story and his marathon tails are an inspiration. Check out the April issue of Runner’s World for the story of the 1986 Boston marathon duel he had with Alberto Salazar.

I ran the first half in 1:27 and the second in 1:30 for a 2:57 finish time. Moved up on about five runners in the last half and wasn’t passed. Managed first place masters, though three more came in behind me in close succession all under 3 hours. #29 on my list of marathon states.

Great conditions, sunny, mostly cool until the end.

Things Done Right:
Good pace.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
This is the best marathon experience I can remember in 59 marathons. The city has done such a good job to preserve the memory of and to honor the victims of the bombing of 1995. The site of the building is now a lawn with chair-like tomb stones in rows representing each of the nine stories of the building stretching up a hill. The street where the Ryder truck parked, Fifth Avenue was replaced with a reflective pool on black marble, with two gates on either end. One gate has 9:01 and the other 9:03. I had to ask the park service person what was the significance of the times. The two gates represent the gates of time. At 9:01 on April 19, 1995 it was a beautiful spring day as Oklahomans started their work day. At 9:03 their world was changed forever.

If you don’t run the marathon, please make a point to go see the memorial. After spending several hours at the memorial and touring the museum I was profoundly moved. If we could somehow sponsor would-be terrorists to come see this memorial with its serenity, to see the determined spirit of people to make sense and have closure with the destructive results of misguided rage I can’t help but hope that most if not all would have a change of heart.


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Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2 M
Goal: 3:30:00
Results: 3:34:41
Website: http://www.okcmarathon.com

General Summary:
This race is presented each year to honor those who were killed in the Oklahoma City Federal Building bombing. It is well-organized and includes around 7500 participants. The course is flat (as is the entire state of Oklahoma), paved, and provides a nice tour of some of the city’s finest neighborhoods. The steepest hills are the freeway overpasses.

Things Done Right:
We had great weather during the actual race... 52 degrees @ start time, low humidity, calm winds, and plenty of sunshine. We were very lucky considering that racers in the past have been plagued by high winds, heat and humidity.

Things Done Wrong:
Since I typically train on vertical trails, the prospect of running on flat asphalt was not very appealing. I think my concerns about doing this type of race became a self-fulfilling prophecy because by mile 16, my joints were hurting from all the pounding (in spite of the four Alleve’s I took). I was on pace to do around a 3:17 until that point. After mile 16, I gave up about a minute per mile. I found myself looking forward to the “hills” to break up the monotony of the flats. While many of the locals struggled with the “hills,” I saw them as opportunities to pass other runners. I certainly look forward to recovering and getting back out on the trails.

Any Other Stuff:
Funny story: Back on New Years Day, I ran the Rescue Run 10K in Palmer Park. A friend of mine and fellow Incliner, Lee “Too Tall” Moss, beat me by four seconds. I could have beat him that day, but I thought he was in an older age group than I was, so I didn’t go for it (turns out we’re only a month apart). So now, any chance he gets, he harasses me about those four seconds.

During mile 15 of the Oklahoma City Marathon, I heard someone from behind me yelling, “Four Seconds! Four Seconds!.” Last time we ran together, Too Tall hadn’t mentioned he was coming out to Oklahoma for this race, so I didn’t believe it was him. I turned around and there he was. Then, there he went. He ended up beating me by about 15 minutes, so it looks like I have more time to make up. (Nice job, Lee... but remember, you’re still older than me, even if it’s only by a month!).

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Lee Moss reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: 3:40 or better
Results: 3:18.27
Website: http://okcmarathon.com

General Summary:
Neat race that started at the OKC National Memorial and finished a block away. Pretty flat course(It’s all relative!)Ran through the town and a couple of parks. Single loop course.

Things Done Right:
Started out slow.
1st mile was 8:34 then 8:15 8:10 ...
Had 3 gels and drank at every station.

Things Done Wrong:
food intake SAT:
AM food consisted of BK sausage egg & cheese
NOON 3 beef tacos, refried beans & rice
PM Turkey & dressing @ Denny’s

Any Other Stuff:
Felt great. Lungs never hurt but the legs were killing me.

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Muddy Moose Trail Races - Wolfeboro, NH - April 25, 2004

Paul Kirsch reports:
Distance: 14 Miles
Goal: Break 2 hours
Results: 2:00:35
Website: http://www.metricmarathon.com

General Summary:
The Muddy Moose is a trail race with lots of hills run mainly on logging roads, snowmobile trails and some single track. It gets its name from the fact that a good portion of the course is really muddy (This is New Hampshire in the Spring). For the first 1/4 mile you attempt to run around the mud and then once your shoes are soaked, you just accept it and run right through it. Some spots have puddles up to your knees with mud over your ankles.

Things Done Right:
My main reason for doing this race was to give me a goal for early in the season for incentives to do long runs. The long, hilly runs I did before this paid off. I did bonk near the end but that’s just a reminder to me that I need to pace myself better. I took one packet of Gu which I took at mile 12. I’m glad I took it as that’s when I really started to fade.

Things Done Wrong:
Went out too fast. I finished with about an 8:34 pace but my first two miles through the really deep mud I did in 7:45. I know that hurt me coming into the last 3 miles or so of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
The course is really well marked for a trail race. Plenty of water stops (4).

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Zane Grey - Pine, AZ - April 24, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 50 mile
Goal: Crew for Dave Mackey, Rick Hessek, Paul Dewitt, Darrin Eisman
Results: Crewed
Website: http://www.zanegrey50.com

General Summary:
Lindsay and I picked up Dave the day before the race at the Phoenix Airport. The other folks drove to the race. After an uneventful drive to Payson we checked into the host hotel (Paysonglo). After we gave Dave some time to take a little nap we stretched our legs out by running up a steep Payson neighborhood. Afterwards we made our way to the Casino that was hosting the pre-race dinner. We ran into Rick, Paul and Darrin at the dinner and had a good time exchanging stories. We went back to the hotel where Dave, Darrin, Linds and I shared a room. At 3:30am we started getting ready for the 5am start. Yikes! The drive to Pine is about 20 minutes from the hotel. Linds and I stayed in the warm car while Dave and Darrin went for a warm up run.

At 5am the race started. I had positioned the car for an easy pullout to travel to the first aid station (Geronimo | Mile 8). During the first part of the course Dave and Scott Creel (50K National Champion)pulled to the lead going through Geronimo at 1:09. Darrin and Paul were with Karl Meltzer, Hiroki, Ian Torrence, Scott Jurek going through about 2 minutes later. A few minutes after Darrin went through I changed into some running clothes and started to do a training run from mile 8 to mile 17. I started running just in front of Dennis Pooleco. Lindsay waited for Rick and then drove to the next aid station. The section between 8 and 17 had a lot of good running sections. This was weird to me as I had heard how poor the course’s footing was. Evidently there had been a lot of course work during the last year and the course markings were almost every 20 feet. Very well marked! It was a fairly lonely run as I never did catch up to Darrin and I put some minutes on Dennis. Once I got to the aid station Lindsa y apprised me that Dave and Scott had gone through the Washington Park aid station at around 2:30. Paul was a couple minutes back from Dave. Darrin had just left the aid station. As we were waiting for Rick. Dennis and Nikki Kimball came through close together. I was surprised that Nikki was at the race as I didn’t know she had an ultra background. Rick was looking well when he came through. We then traveled to the 4th aid station as the 3rd station (Hell’s Gate Canyon) was not open to the crew members. Dave coming through the Fish Hatchery aid station had evidently pulled away from Scott during the last few miles. He ended up 2 minutes ahead of Scott at this point. Paul was 17 minutes back and Karl next, then Ian, Jurek and Darrin behind them. Hiroki came and calapsed at the aid station. He had evidently experiencing extreme nausia as he threw up time and time again. An ambulance was called. Rick was keeping pace and looking much better than last year.

We then headed out to the Christopher Creek aid station in time to catch Dave. Dave had lost a little time but was still 4 minutes ahead of Scott Creel. Paul had some trouble too and was passed by Karl during this section. Ian and Jurek came in afterwards. We then had to leave Kevin Tavener from Denver in charge of Darrin and Rick’s aid as we tried to arrive at the finish to witness Dave’s course record finish. (Un)fortunately we were late. Dave had shattered the course record by 16 minutes! 7:51:07 was his finishing time. Dave left it all out on the course as he put an additional 6 minutes on Creel in the last 6 miles! Scott came threw at 8:01:42, a course record any other year. Karl (former CR holder) was 3rd (8:15:33). Paul finished fourth (8:43:01). Ian (8:44:40) was directly behind Paul. Jurek, slowed by his 50 the previous weekend was @ 8:56:38. Darrin improved his time from last year with 9:09:52. Nikki out sprinted Dennis at the line for an outstanding course record performance (9:14:24). Ri ck had an excellent 12th place finish with 9:48:24. Way to go guys! With the exception of Darrin, who had to get back right away, we went out for Mexican that night to celebrate.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:

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Boston Marathon - Boston - April 19, 2004

Boston Marathon - Boston - April 19, 2004
Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: <4 hrs
Results: 4:43:31
Website: http://www.baa.org

General Summary:
New England spring decided to turn hot on all the runners this year. It was really warm at the start but got a bit better along the course when the strong breeze was more noticeable. An awesome event of course with a lot of people watching along the roads. I started almost at the end of the pack so it took 20 minutes before we even started moving.

Things Done Right:
I stayed hydrated and paced myself on 9 minute miles. I have been training on Heartbreak hills so I had no problem running up all of them. Ate a lot of oranges along. People also handed out popsicles which was nice in the heat.

Things Done Wrong:
I drank way too much! I had to stop 10 (!!) times to go to the bathroom. I lost a lot of time standing in line for the porta potties. I was too afraid to reduce the fluid intake too much so it continued through the whole race. Very annoying. I would say I lost 30 minutes or more on that.

Any Other Stuff:
The course is well known. :) Of course I had my IC shirt on.
I got a chance to run this race as part of a charity project for Michael Carter Lisnow Respite Center in Hopkinton (www.hopkintonrespite.com). Very honorable.

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Chaz Lalonde reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:20
Results: 3:48

General Summary:
I had a great training season with most of my runs in the GOG so that my body would get used to “pounding the pavement.” Unfortunately, none of my runs were in the heat that we encountered in this years marathon. 80F at the start and 85F at the end. I likely would not have finished if it weren’t for all the spectators with garden hoses!

Things Done Right:
great training runs for 16 weeks leading up to the race as well as a good taper.

Things Done Wrong:
Perhaps a little too much site seeing with the family on Sat and Sun.

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Laura Mitchell reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:30
Results: 3:54

General Summary:
The Boston Marathon is a historic event starting in Hopkinton and ending in Downtown Boston. The race begins with a downhill then continues with slight rolling hills. miles 16-21 are a series of steeper hills including the famous heartbreak hill. Miles 21-26.2 are a slight downhill finish. The crowd is fantastic and extremely supportive. The BAA knows how to “run” a marathon. This race is very well organized, and well worth running. On race day the temperature was much hotter than usual (80 degrees to begin the race, 86 to finish).

Things Done Right:
I tried to follow Galloway’s marathon training schedule. I trained with the Incline Club, mostly in the Garden of the Gods to get in some pavement time. I hydrated well before, during, and after the race. I took time to drink 2-3 waters/Gatorades at each aid station. Every time someone from the crowd offered water, I poured it on my head. I ate correctly, and felt well during the race. I enjoyed the race! I started the race right on pace, and kept pace for the first 9 miles. I decided around mile 10 to slow down, and changed my goal to finishing under four hours. I was not used to the extreme heat, and I saw other runners collapsing that early in the race!

Things Done Wrong:
I trained fairly consistently, but my speedwork was not as consistent as my distance training. One of these days I hope to train and run a road marathon in 3:30!

Any Other Stuff:
My husband Stephen also ran the Boston Marathon. This was the first time for each of us to run it. This trip to Boston, and the Marathon is how we celebrated our 20th wedding anniversary!

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Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: PR
Results: PW — Net Finish Time: 4:02:37

General Summary:
Well, its Boston. Great crowds, great overall experience.

Things Done Right:
I trained harder for this race than any other race I’ve done. I ran around 60 miles every week since January. I did speed work for two months leading up to the race (Yasso 800’s). I did 8 long runs. I tapered the week before to about 25 miles.

Things Done Wrong:
Several elite runners spoke before the event and said to throw your game plan out the window because it was too hot and you would suffer. I thought they weren’t talking to me and I refused to give up my game plan to PR. Went out a little to fast, dialed it back and was right on pace at about 5 miles. I knew by mile 8 that this was not my day. What I did wrong was that I wouldn’t listen to the runners with alot more experience. Rather than go out easy and enjoy this once in a lifetime deal, I suffered from mile 10 until the end. I took water and Gatorade at every station (they were every mile) but obviously I didn’t have enough because I passed out at the finish line and lucky me, I got my first IV!!!

Any Other Stuff:
Its Boston, great event, great crowds. It was like being in a people parade:)
Also, my 10 minutes of fame. I was interviewed by the Boston Globe in the med tent and it made the AP.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/sports/article/0,1299,DRMN_2_2821736,00.html

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Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: Celebrate 20 years of marriage
Results: Had a fabulous time with my wife

General Summary:
My wife and I have always wanted to run the Boston Marathon. We decided it would be a great way to celebrate 20 years of marriage as a running couple.

FRIDAY 16APR04 — We flew out and got to our hotel before sundown, highly recommend an early arrival.

SATURDAY 17APR04 — We didn’t get a car, and decided it would be easiest to ride the “T” (subway, metro). We took the T to the expo and picked up our packet first thing. The expo was wonderful and just about everything a runner would want from bible verse shirts to gizmos and gadgets. The packet pick up was easy and quick. We immediately went to the official clothes sales area and got some nice clothes (make sure you pick up a pamphlet and a little clipboard with order forms, they were hidden by the registers). We took the chartered tour of the course, having never run it before, we thought it best to at least see it in a bus. It was worth the $25 to relieve some anxiety over the course. The bus tour included great insight from out guide who has run it 20 times or so.

SUNDAY 18APR04 — We toured the town. We bought a “GO BOSTON” card at the expo and used it. We did a “Duck” tour (great), a trolley tour (very informative), toured the USS Constitution (old Ironsides), and did the Freedom Trail walk. We ended up at the City Hall just in time for the start of the Pasta Dinner. We retired early.

MONDAY 19APR04 — This was the most exciting road marathon I’ve ever run. It was a fantastic experience and I highly recommend it to anyone wishing to run a great marathon. The most striking aspect was the spectators, the people were watching at all parts of the route. Wellesley College was as loud as Gordon Barnett had warned. Boston College was out in force. And the 4-game series between the Red Sox and the Yankees let out just in time to see the marathon pack finish, those fans were happy and loud as well. The support was unmatched, every mile had water and Gatorade, the BAA gave sliced oranges out to the crowd along the route, people gave out popsicles, ice, water, and other beverages. The course was nice, mostly flat, and Heartbreak Hill was not extreme (I might judge it differently if I lived in the flatlands). The temperature was warm, it hit 87 in Boston, and it seemed hotter than that in places on the route. My shoes were sticking to the tar on the road. The first time in race history, the fire hydrants were opened up by the firefighters and the runners were sprayed at every opportunity. The wind was significant, but it was a tailwind, good for effort required, bad for thermal exchange, with no cross or head wind, it was a long warm run. The bus support to the race start location was amazing, there must have been 450+ buses (get there early, they had bus problems with the last buses and some people made it to the race only minutes before the start, I like to relax before the race and concentrate on the race). There were a lot of porta pots at the athletes village, but not near enough, the lines were very long, 25 minutes minimum (I was almost to the point where I would finish up and just get back in line). Once we arrived in the “athletes village” (a ball field at a school) we picked a spot near the stage and we were able to see Johnny Kelly (96 year old man who ran Boston 61 times and finished 58 of them). They provide you a bag and a sticker for the bag with your name and number when you pick up your packet. You use the bag for runner drop off and pick up (they won’t accept other bags). The bag drop was efficient (the buses used to haul runners were used to haul the bags to the finish), each bus had numbers on the windows (like numbers of 5000 in bus 5, and each window was for say 100 race numbers), you just went to the window and handed the person your bag, same thing at the finish area. Depending on your number, you were placed in a corral by 1000 number (numbers in 5000s were in corral 5)and it took about 1 minute per corral to get to the start line (so corral 10 might have taken about 10 minutes to get to the start line). The race support started at 2 miles. There were not enough potties along the way and some runners ruined peoples flower beds doing there thing. The first part of the course is down hill, so don’t thrash your quads right off the start. The hills are at what can be the toughest part of the course around 20 miles. Other than that it was mostly flat. Even after the race and it being hot, it felt good to get a Mylar blanket taped over my shoulders. The bag of food and drinks were great. Bag pick up was easy. Family meeting area was situated around a city block and that gave plenty of room. The T was near the exit and that made it easy to get back to the room for a shower. We retired early and flew home the next morning.

Things Done Right:
Got to Boston early, helped us get in the time zone
Hydrated well for a warm race
Trained with the club until 2 months before race
Trained in the Garden of the Gods last 2 months
Maintained an even effort through race not an even pace
Enjoyed the entire event
Didn’t do anything I hadn’t practiced
Ate my usual breakfast (hard race to prep for because of the bus pick up and drop off well before race)
Lubed my feet with bag balm
Wore my Incline Club tank top
Brought enough Carb Boom and Peppermint candy
Wore my 3-week old, broken-in shoes
Wore 50SPF sun block all over
Wore a hat and glasses (very sunny)
Creased my cups to drink every drop
Walked through support area

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t think of anything

Any Other Stuff:
This is a class event and a marathon to run if you want a great experience. I’m sure the 3000+ people who did not finish and the 1000 who ended up in the hospital might not agree.

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Dan Smith reports:
Distance: 26.2 mi
Goal: 3:30
Results: 4:28

General Summary:
You’ve all heard how hot it was. I had low expectations because I was injured in Jan and didn’t run; then skied most of Feb to train for the American Birkebeiner. So my running base was rather thin. I did run a 22 miler on trails a week before.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated like a maniac. Wore my heart monitor and kept it between 155-160 during the early downhill miles. Wasn’t too proud to walk when the going got tough.

Things Done Wrong:
It still wasn’t enough. Not enough training miles will get you every time if the weather is hot.

Any Other Stuff:
You don’t know how good a race the winner had to run sub-5 pace. AWESOME! Hats off to Kenya. I wonder if any of them every considered running Pikes Peak?

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Dave Reily reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:30 — 3;45
Results: 3:45:05

General Summary:
My second Boston — pretty hot with a tailwind. Most everyone faded in the second half. I held it together pretty well and did well for my age group. Good to see a good Incline Club contingent there, as well as other folks from Colorado. Great fan support.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well and grabbed water for my noggin. Maintained a fairly steady, slightly conservative pace that paid off. Readjusted my thinking and self-talk when doubts crept in the night before. Had a gel 15 minutes before start and then roughly each 40-45 minutes. Rested the day before the race and ate well.

Things Done Wrong:
Let my weight get 5-8 pounds above my optimum. Didn’t do enough long pace runs, mostly speed intervals, hills, and long slow runs.

Any Other Stuff:
It was nice to go back a second time and vindicate myself from a poor performance in 2000. What I liked most was the historic route and the amazing crowds! The subway (aka the “T”) is very handy for getting around town — no big need for a rental car or a taxi.

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:10
Results: 3:18

General Summary:
The Boston Marathon is the world’s oldest annual marathon. It was a beautiful day around 85 degrees. There is an amazing amount of crowd support at this race and it was a great experience.

Things Done Right:
I had trained hard for this marathon even running a half-marathon a few weeks before at my goal marathon race pace. I hydrated very well in the days leading up to the race and took in fluids at almost every aid station ( which is every mile )

Things Done Wrong:
I am not quite sure what went wrong. It was a hot day and my legs cramped up at around mile 20. Even with the heat I felt very strong though about 30 km. Perhaps I need to do longer training runs.

Any Other Stuff:
The course starts in Hopkinton and ends in Boston. For the most part it is a gentle downhill until around the town of Newton. I had heard of the hills at Newton especially Heartbreak Hill, but did not take them serious enough. Once again it was great to run a race with such overwhelming crowd support!

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: Boston PR (Until We Heard the Temperature Forecast!)
Results: 3:40:16 (Net/Chip Time)

General Summary:
In a word, hot!

This was my second Boston, having run it in 2002 I had wanted to return and run this amazing marathon again. Fred Wright who has run Boston many times, told me he couldn’t count the number of times weather played a factor in this marathon... boy did his words ever ring true!

Things Done Right:
Pre race:
- Trained and tapered well.
- Arrived in Boston on Saturday.
- Went to the Expo on Saturday.
- Rested the day before.

Race day:
- Went prepared for the wait at the athlete’s village.
- Hydrated and ate wisely.
- Stayed in the shade.
- Kept moving after the finish line, and walked back to our hotel.
- Carole (best support crew ever) met me at mile 16 with water bottles, this was so cool — literally!

Things Done Wrong:
I can’t really think of anything I did wrong, although given the conditions (75F at the start — 86F at the finish) I ran through as many sprinklers and fire hoses as I could to combat the blazing pavement. This made for wet shoes and socks, which started what felt like blisters on my feet — something I’m not used too.

Any Other Stuff:
Felt great for the first 17 miles, rather frustrated with the last 9.2... but again given the conditions, I was proud to have finished, even if I was 2 minutes slower than 2002. Maybe next time =:)

Once again, Boston is so well organized and prepared for anything. There were 900+ runners that required medical attention of some degree, and 100+ that required hospitalization.

For a course description, please refer to my Boston Marathon 2002 race report.

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London Marathon - London, UK - April 18, 2004

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Finish and have fun
Results: 2:57:44

General Summary:
My wife and my parents went on vacation to London for 8 days because I had gained entry into the London Marathon. My plan was to have a good time, see the sites and enjoy the race.

In general, London would have to be the best marathon I have ever done, period. And I have done enough for comparison. London is the biggest marathon in the world. They had over 40K people registered. However, because of the drizzle and cold, only 32K finished.

Now, I have done Boston, NYC, Marine Corps and Chicago and London is better than all of them! First off, getting to the start was a breeze. With a 945 start we left the hotel at 745, walked the 3 blocks to the subway and enjoyed our trip. We had to change trains a couple of times, but that is to be expected in a city the size of London. Once off the train, it was a 10 minute walk to the starting area. All I had to do was throw my bag in the trucks and head to the start line.

Like Boston and NYC, London has corals. I was in the first coral so I assumed I would have to fight a few people to get up to my entrance. Wrong. It took me a whopping 60s.

Once in the coral (10 minutes before the start, unlike to 60 minutes at NYC) the volunteers slowly walked us up to the front (in behind the elite men). This was a smooth as could be. Maybe it is just the mentality of the runners in Europe, but not a sole pushed and shoved there way to the front.

Once the gun went off, the real fun began. My plan was to run 3:00-3:15 and just enjoy the sites. I figured that this time would put my in the top 300-400 (I ran 2:58 at NYC and was 300th). I went out a bit harder then planned due to the amount of people around me and the numbers of people lining the streets. After a 6:45 second mile, I tried to slow but couldn’t. I found myself running 640s for a bit when all of the sudden the 7:00 pace group went by me!

The first half of the course not as scenic as the 2nd half. You go over the Tower Bridge at 13 miles and that is when the people lining the streets went from 2 deep to 10 deep!

After a 7 mile loop through east London (where there was still crowds lining the street) we ran past the Tower of London, Big Ben, The London Eye, and finished at Buckingham Palace. I didn’t see the Queen waving to me as I passed, but I guess I didn’t really expect it :-)

At the finish, we were given our Medals and a goodie Bag that weighed 5 Lbs and that was it. I expected beer and food (the food was in the goodie bag which I didn’t look through until we were back at the hotel) but there was none to be found.

We started our walk back and within 5 minutes he stopped at a Pub for that beer and food I was looking for. That particular one was full, so we walked another 5 minutes to the subway, changed trains once and got off at the stop by our Hotel. Right at the top of the subway stairs was another Pub, so we went there.

I had a Fuller’s London Pride from the hand pump, watched to BBC coverage of the race, asked the Bartender if I could buy the glass (which he gave to me for free) and then headed back to the hotel.

We would finish the day at another Pub for dinner and Beer.

That finished the day on the best marathon I have done. I would suggest this marathon to anyone in an instant. If you want to run fast, there will be tons of people around you (2:30 was 200th, I was 950th in 2:57:44). If you want to run slow and enjoy the scenery, there will be tons of people with you then (30000th place was 5:57)

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:

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Brickyard - Martinez to Port Costa, CA - April 18, 2004

Nancy reports:
Distance: 8 Miles
Goal: Training run, have fun
Results: 2nd woman, 1st age group, 57:10; on top finished team — PAMAKIDS

General Summary:
Went out comfortable and steady because the course is very challenging with lots of hills. Paved with a few dirt sections, lovely views of the Carquinez Straits. Out and back course. Ran just under 30 minutes out and felt great so picked it up on the way back and felt better and better passing people all the way back running just under 27 minutes back.

Things Done Right:
Went out easy, had a positive attitude. Couldn’t have done anything differently for a better time (maybe more training, but not bad without speedwork so far this year).

Things Done Wrong:
N/A

Any Other Stuff:
Hilly, hilly course. Great day, perfect temps. Rain held out til awards ceremony and then only drizzles.


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20K at Moab - Moab Utah - April 17, 2004

Joe and Brenda Cowell reports:
Distance: 20K
Goal: 2:29
Results: 2:15
Website: http://trailrun.com

General Summary:
Beautiful course with great desert views. The weather was cool and perfect for running.

Things Done Right:
Carried water and glad we did. Only two water stops. Also tried to keep a steady pace after going out slow for the first couple miles.

Things Done Wrong:
Next time we would push it a little harder on the last two miles now that we are familiar with the course.

Any Other Stuff:
Even though the entire course was on asphalt we were able to run off to the side on gravel for much of the race. Course was generally downhill and very different from what we are used to in CO. Lots of open desert and great rock formations.

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Run with the Rebels - Las Vegas, NV - April 17, 2004

Linda Ronas reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: have fun
Results: 25:53
Website: http://

General Summary:
I believe this race was the 1st running of the Run with the Rebels, which benefited the UNLV women’s basketball team. Team members ran the course along with participants (duh) and overall was a very nice, small get-together.

Things Done Right:
All those days spent tapering poolside seemed to really help.....

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
The course started at the Thomas & Mack Center and was run primarily on the UNLV campus, which was very scenic. I was surprised that for such a small race (~ 100?) that chip timing was used; a first for me. Not sure exactly what my time was since the local running club’s website doesn’t have any race results posted since Jan 04.

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Clear Lake Earth Day 5K - Clear Lake, Iowa - April 17, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: Run as well as possible but mainly to test the status of my injured Achilles tendon
Results: 6th overall; 1st in age group; time of 20:45
Website: http://

General Summary:
2nd annual, early spring road race. It’s a fun event with great “goodie” bag; electronic calculator, coolmax running socks, Frisbee, ink pens, shirt, etc. It’s an out and back course on pavement. Entries increased about 60% this year from the inaugural race.

Things Done Right:
I took the lead of the race near the one mile mark and briefly held thoughts of perhaps winning it for the second year in a row (last year I was 1st overall in 18:31. However, this year I was smart enough to back off as soon as my Achilles began to tighten. I eased through the last two miles and showed no ill effects the next day when I was able to put in a scheduled two hour, long run.

Things Done Wrong:
Nearly allowed race day excitement to draw me to an effort beyond my current physical (injury recovery) and fitness level (no speed work).

(Thankfully, as I stated above, I quickly realized the situation and backed off appropriately)

Any Other Stuff:


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Ahwatukee Foothills YMCA Spring 5K - Phoenix, AZ - April 17, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: sub 16:20
Results: 16:45
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com/ahfoothillsymca.htm

General Summary:
I thought this was going to be an easy 5K and was looking forward to lowering my 5K PR set last Friday. Lindsay and I showed up at the Mountain Pointe High School at around 7:20. After retrieving our numbers I went out to the track to warm up. I ran a mile and a half with strides. Then I moved the warm up to the starting line doing strides and slow running. I started to see that this wasn’t going to be an easy run to win. Carlos Paradelo (Marathon Olympic Trails qualifier) and his wife Brianna were running. Carlos had waisted me when he ran a 44+ minute 15K a couple of years ago. However, I didn’t know what kind of shape he was in currently. The race director announced that he was offering $125 for 1st, $100 for second and $75 for third. Wow! This should be interesting. The gun sounded and most everyone sprinted at the beginning. I made sure to go out conservatively in the first 200 meters. When we turned the corner to head onto the road I realized that Brianna was in front of me and Carlos was lead ing the race with a couple people with him. I bridged the gap to Brianna and then passed a couple Bandito club members, Chris and Louis Pancetta. Then I made the mistake of bridging the gap to Carlos. Once I reached the front of the pack I realized that I had wasted a lot of energy doing that. After a while I decided to cut my losses and recover for a minute. I fell back slightly. That was when the eventual winner, Dyrk Greenhalgh (16:09), passed me. The course was definitely uphill which showed in the times. I passed the first mile split at 5:14. During the second mile the course made a right hand turn and climbed up a very steep hill. This is when I passed Carlos. He still stuck with me for some time. After reaching the top the course started heading downhill. This is when Brent Steiner and Jason Lewis passed me. I didn’t know either at the time. I was able to match Jason’s speed, but Brent took off. Finally Jason slowed a bit and I passed him. The last mile seemed to last forever. I crossed the line in fourth at 16:45. Carlos evidently dropped back to pace his wife Brianna. She came through at 17:13. Lindsay PR’d with a 23:10! It was good for 19th place overall. Way to go Linds!

Things Done Right:
Fuel/Hydration. Went out easy at the beginning.

Things Done Wrong:
Hard Thursday workout... should have moved my middle of the week quality run to Wednesday. Made my move to the front too early. I should have waited until the big hill.

Any Other Stuff:
Tough course for a 5K, but lots of fun. I’d do it again. Good prizes... money and gift certificates.

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Lindsay Cavner reports:
Distance: 5k
Goal: 7:35 pace
Results: 7:31 pace

General Summary:
Course was generally flat with one unexpected hill. All on pavement, we seem to have so much of that here in Phoenix.

Things Done Right:
Picked a person at the right pace to try to stick with and then pushed it in hard at the end.
Hydrated very well.

Things Done Wrong:
Ate a burrito the night before. Should have pushed harder in the beginning and stuck with it throughout -because extreme pain is extremely good.
Let an old man and a young boy almost pass me at the end.

Any Other Stuff:
Free Java Juice smoothies were great. Lots of food and starbucks coffee...yum.

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Mesa Classic - Mesa, Arizona - April 9, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 5000 meter
Goal: PR
Results: 16:20
Website:

General Summary:
My goal this year is to break into the marathon and 50K distance, but to not sacrifice speed in doing so. I have targeted several 5000 meter races to make sure that I am still keeping up my speed. This particular race was my first collegiate 5000 meter race on the track. My goal was threefold. I wanted to run a consistent effort throughout the race. I didn’t want to push too hard, because my goal was to set a target in which to beat for future 5000 meter races. However, I still wanted to PR. This should not be too hard as my fastest 5000 meter previously was pretty slow (16:40). About 40 of us lined up at the start line. I was seeded 20th. I knew going into this race that I was going to be lapped by at least one person. Obed, the Kenyan, from Central Arizona Community College was a 13+ minute 5000 runner. Then the gun went off.

I was passed by a huge amount of runners as I had promised myself to go as easy as possible on the first lap. First lap went through for me at 74. It seemed the hardest effort of the whole race was keeping the pace at 74 on the first lap, which was still a little fast for me. I started passing people at the beginning of the second lap. I even lapped some folks during the race that were in front of me at the end of the first quarter! Wow, some folks really go out too fast. My feet started burning during the first part of the race. This happens to me on the track. I think it maybe time for some spikes. Somehow Lindsay got past the guards and positioned herself in the field right next to the track. She would yell encouraging words at every loop. The first mile was passed at 5:07. I didn’t feel any significant slowing especially since I was passing tons of people, but somehow I slowed a little bit. Obed did end up lapping me once. He ended up with a 14:20. I didn’t push very much during the last mile, b ut accelerated a little in the last 100 yards going through at 16:20. This was good for 15th place. Wow! I’m now a “middle of the packer.”

Things Done Right:
Hydration and fueling before the race. Good warmup.

Things Done Wrong:
A little too fast on the first lap. Need to focus a little more on the task at hand during the race. Track spikes would be helpful or perhaps body glide on the feet. My feet were burning for 2 hours after the race.

Any Other Stuff:
The heat started at 11pm! I was ready for bed.

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St Louis Marathon - St Louis, MO - April 4, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: under 3 hours
Results: 2:59:59, 4th in age group
Website: http://www.stlouismarathon.com/stl_marathon/

General Summary:
I didn’t know what to expect with this marathon since I’d only run a grand total of three times in the two weeks leading up to the marathon. So I wisely decided to simply run how I felt. 6:40 miles felt good, so that’s what I ran. Later I slowed to 7+ pace, but still managed to go under three hours.

This time I brought my daughter Natalie along, so we made it a father/daughter bonding trip replete with movie, a couple dinners out, visiting the high point of Missouri, Mt Taum Sauk, my 36th state high point, and also squeezing in a 3-hour visit for Natalie with an old friend.

This was my 28th marathon state.

Things Done Right:
Ran within myself.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much sleep the night of the race with losing an hour and daylight savings time. Don’t think it hurt my performance any though.

Any Other Stuff:
They ran the Women’s Olympic Trials on Saturday on a different course.

This race has increased steadily in popularity in the last five years. Since the St Louis Track Club gave it up to a full-time paid race organizer it has gone from 800 runners to 8000 and is bringing in many locals to the fun with relays and a “Read, Write, Run” program for kids to read 26 books, write 26 essays, and run 26 miles (not all at once).

Well organized, good spectators. St Louis is also a great city. The race goes twice through Forest Park, the fourth largest urban park in the country, in itself a real gem with several museums (all free) and a zoo.

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Jen Taylor reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Run and have fun!
Results: 3:37 (7th in age group)

General Summary:
It was a fun race since I’m from St. Louis and am familiar with the city. The weather was great and I just had fun running!
My family always comes to support and cheer me on. This race was even better since they knew the side streets — they showed up about every 2 miles!

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Platte River Trail Run - Littleton Colorado - Sunday, April 4, 2004

Kay Wieder reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2 1/2 hours
Results: 2:17:29
Website: http://www.runnersroost.com/platteriverresults.html

General Summary:
This should be called the Platte River “Sidewalk” Run as the whole trail is cement. It was a nice run along the river. Run ended at the old Buckhorn Restaurant in Denver. The weather was perfect!

Things Done Right:
Took my time. Started out slow. Of course, I am slow!!! Was able to speed up the last half mile. Stayed hydrated. Ate enough.

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t think of any.

Any Other Stuff:


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Umstead 100 - Umstead State Park, Raleigh NC - April 3 & 4, 2004

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 28:19:19
Website: http://ncroadrunners.org

General Summary:
The Umstead 100 is a ten mile loop course ten times. Although the loops and footing isn’t difficult, there is considerable mental challenge with having to go out again on the same course every ten miles, each time getting more tired. But it is a well organized race, with outstanding aid stations and support.

Things Done Right:
Took in enough calories the first 70 miles. Good thing, because I couldn’t keep anything down but crackers and water for the last 30. Or as I would say, “clean-up on mile 75!"
Went out strong, but not too fast,(like that is ever an issue for me)and didn’t spend longer than 3 minutes at an aid station.
Ate a lot of alkaline foods prior to the race to keep my ph level down. And I found an awesome pacer to help me thorugh the 8th and 9th loop.

Things Done Wrong:
Threw up after 70 miles a lot. Had nothing left but stubborness to get me through the end.

Any Other Stuff:
Any one looking for a good first time 100 miler should consider Umstead. It is well-organized and the volunteers are great. It is pretty reasonable as far as the entry fee goes as well. The park and facilities are impeccable. The finishers buckle is beautiful.

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Rockin K - Kanapolis Lake, Kansas - April 3, 2004

Daiva Cooper reports:
Distance: 26.5 — 27.0 miles
Goal: to finish
Results: finished

General Summary:
4 interconnected loop trails in Kanapolis State Park near Ellsworth, KS. The course was a mixture of horse trails, dirt trails with some downed trees, sand, water crossings, cow paths, and pasture land that appeared to be bushhogged for the race.

Things Done Right:
1. Drank enough
2. Ate enough food during the run
3. Ate a gel every hour
4. Took my Succeed caps every hour

Things Done Wrong:
1. Should have researched the course better --- the footing was terrible throughout most of the race
2. Should have started my caffeinated gel shots earlier — I resorted to drinking 2 huge glasses of coke at mile 18

Any Other Stuff:

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Eisenhower Marathon - Abilene, KS - March 27, 2004

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Get The State
Results: 16th in 3:32
Website: http://www.eisenhowermarathon.com

General Summary:
This was to be my 25th state in my goal of running a marathon in all 50 states.

What can I say about running rural Kansas in March? One word, wind! 30 mph wind to be exact. For 11 miles, we ran head on into this wind. My normal easy pace of 700-715 was slowed to 830-915 (depending on the hills). Then there was 4 miles of cross wind that made me feel like a flag.

Finally at 15, we got the wind at our back and I got a chance to look up and see the beautiful Kansas countryside.

Then it started to rain. Go figure.

Needless to say, the weather was terrible.

However, the race itself was nice. The small community of 5000 really supports the race (this being the 2nd year). There were a lot of volunteers (400 to only 250 runners). The pre-race and post-race meals were outstanding.

However, the 6 hour drive back to Denver was not.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:


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Usery Pass Trail Race - Mesa, AZ - March 27, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 14+ miles
Goal: Fast training run
Results: 1st
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com

General Summary:
Usery Pass Trail Race is an informal race with two loops around the scenic Usery Peak in Mesa, AZ. It is free except for the park entrance fee. I was very excited about this run as there are very few trail runs in the area that are under the marathon distance. My favorite distances are ones that I can run hard for the entire distance. So far, this doesn’t include the marathon. :) After arriving at the park I was very happy to run into Dennis Poolheco. Dennis has dominated the ultra scene in the valley for some time. Although I didn’t know how a shorter race would unfold. My friend John Hughes also came to the race as we had plans to do a little kayaking afterwards. John has been stepping up his training, so I was looking forward to seeing how his race would improve.

Before starting the race the race director warned that the rattle snakes were awake and occupying the trail at times. My run-ins with rattle snakes have been somewhat dramatic in the past, and I was not relishing the idea of another face off. The RD also explained that we were to do the loop clockwise for the first loop and counter clockwise for the second loop. At his go ahead we started.

John took the lead from the line and I followed at a comfortable distance. Dennis stayed back a little ways. The course was awesome at this point — rolling trail. I tried to take the downhills efficiently. After a mile or so I felt John slow somewhat. I eased forward and he let me pass. At this point I gained ground as we started up the first major hill. Dennis caught up with John and they seemed to be working together which concerned me somewhat. After a few miles of gradual uphill we had a nice long, steep downhill. I could still see Dennis and John working together a couple minutes back. Eventually we came to the turnaround. My watch read 57 minutes which I was very surprised as I thought the course was faster than that, and I was putting in somewhat of a hard effort. After turning around I passed Dennis first and then John. They seemed to be 2 or 3 minutes back. I forced myself to keep pace up the long hill. I saw John at the top of the hill and it seemed he had faded somewhat, but I could not see De nnis. I suspected the worst and pushed as fast as I could down the pass. I passed a bag piper practicing on the trail (very inspiring). Towards the end I felt myself getting tired, but I held on to the finish (1:55:10). Dennis and John came in at 2:04 something. Dennis had passed John towards the end. Evidently there had been some back and forth drama between the two.

After the race the Race Director brought out the BBQ. Wow! What a deal. A free race that even included a BBQ. I tried to leave a donation, but none was accepted. John and I ate a great lunch while Dennis went out for another loop to get in his mileage!

Things Done Right:
Held the pace the whole way. Hydrated well.

Things Done Wrong:
I was a little sore from my Thursday workout, but this was a training race. So, I’m not going to beat myself up about that. Should have brought an energy gel though.

Any Other Stuff:
Awesome course!

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Bataan Death March - White Sands Missile Range, NM - March 21, 2004


Sandra Powell reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: finish as a team uninjured
Results: won our division
Website: http://www.bataanmarch.com

General Summary:
The Bataan Death March is a marathon through the desert of New Mexico to commemorate the soldiers in WWII that were left in the Phillipines. The run is limited to 4000 people, and consists of about 2/3 military personnel and 1/3 civilians. People may complete the marathon as an individual or a team (five members running the whole distance). Usually hot and windy weather, but the esprit de corps is worth it! For the real masochists, you can compete in the heavy division with a 35-pound pack. Military teams must do the march in their uniform, including boots!

Things Done Right:
We stayed well hydrated. There is great support along the route. We also had lots of electrolytes among us, as well as suntan lotion. Also remembered my gaiters, as most of this run is in sand.

Things Done Wrong:
Need darker lenses for my sunglasses. The light colored sand reflected a lot of light that a cap won’t keep out. It was almost like running in snow in a couple places.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of rolling hills, and probably only 1500’ elevation climb. A mile long deep sand pit at about mile 21 really sucks the energy out of you. But getting together afterwards and hearing the stories from the real Bataan survivors really makes this all worthwhile and leaves you with a lump in your throat.

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Crown King Scramble 50M/50k - Phoenix Arizona - March 13, 2004

Gina Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50k
Goal: Make sure I can do the distance (Hoping for 6 hours)
Results: 6:27
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com/crown_king.htm

General Summary:
This was my first ultra, so I went out really slow because I was worried about hitting a wall later. Turns out, I was way too conservative. Not only did I feel strong all the way to the end, but I was hardly even sore the next day. So, that was good and bad. I was pleased that I had a good, solid run for my first ultra, but disappointed in my overall time. This is a beautiful course with awesome aid stations. They run out to meet you and fill your water bottle up so when you get to the station your ready to go. At the aid stations they had tons of food, you could stop and have a picnic if you wanted. This year was an anomaly, in that it had rained in Phoenix for the past few weeks, including the night before. The first 15 miles were very muddy (you know, the thick red mud that sucks off your shoes and adds two pounds to each shoe?). It was good to start climbing to higher ground after 15 miles to get out of the mud.

Things Done Right:
I trained hard for about 8 weeks leading up to the race, including running with the Incline Club. I did several long runs. I ate light the day before. I drank a lot of water, took 4 electrolyte pills, and ate and drank Gatorade at every aid station. I went out slow so as not to hit the wall.

Things Done Wrong:
I went out too slow while it was still flat enough to make good time. By the time I made it to 20 miles and realized I was still feeling pretty good, I couldn’t make up all the time I had given up in the race.

Any Other Stuff:
The 50K course starts near Lake Pleasant, AZ and initially runs on well maintained dirt roads over rolling hills, climbing steadily from 1500 feet. At 15 miles, the course enters the Prescott National Forest onto the rugged, poorly maintained forest service roads. The rate of climb increases dramatically from this point. Between aid station three (23 miles) and mile 29, the road climbs approximately 2400 feet to 6570 feet. The final two miles drops some 700 feet to the finish. The overall elevation gain is approximately 5000 ft.

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Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: 50 K
Goal: 5:30
Results: 5:27:54
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com/crown_king.htm

General Summary:
This is a fantastic race starting near Lake Pleasant, AZ and ending in a very small town of Crown King. The race starts out at around 1500 ft and reaches an altitude of 6500 before dropping into Crown King. About 150 people entered the 50k; there is a 50 mile race as well. It started at 7:00 am and was perfect running weather. It had rained that morning, but cleared up in time for the race and the temperature never got very warm.

Things Done Right:
I have had problems with keeping myself properly hyrdated in the past, so I worked hard on that. I drank a complete water bottle between each aid station and that helped immensely. I trained hard and the incline club training was huge. Besides that I tried to keep a slightly slower pace than I am use to.

Things Done Wrong:
This race went very well for me, but my legs did get tired around mile 27 and I was forced to walk some. The one thing that I should have done better is to drink more water the days leading up to the race.

Any Other Stuff:
The course starts out on a paved road and after a few miles becomes a dirt road. Eventually the road turns into a 4-wheel drive road and gets steep at times. The course is somewhat rolling, but is basically uphill for 28.5 miles with the last 2.5 miles downhill. Because of the rain before the race there was quite a bit of mud on the flatter sections. The mud was frustrating, but I figured it was the same for all of us so do the best that you can do. The aid stations were great! They were about every 7-8 miles and volunteers would run up to you and take your water bottle and fill it up for you.

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Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: 4:25
Results: 5:08
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com/crown_king.htm

General Summary:
The Crown King 50K climbs from 1500 elevation to 6570 elevation and down into the old mining town of Crown King (6000 elevation). The course is rolling during this time, so it is actually much more elevation gain then just 5000 ft. The Crown King has a 50 mile contingent as well. They started at 3am! We arrived around 6:40am for the 7am start of the Crown King. There had been heavy rains the night before and rumors of mud on the course. When the gun went off Sean Andrish quickly ran to the front. I had convinced myself that I was just as fast as Sean, but that was very quickly being proved false. Someone else joined him at the front. I held back and tried to pace myself. However, I wanted to be in a position if either one of them faltered that I could take advantage. Unfortunately this goal caused me to go out to hard. A couple miles in we encountered the mud. The mud lasted off and on for 20 miles. Due to the 50 mile folks and the aid station vehicles the course was completely destroyed and was in essence a “sea of mud” with the worst footing I have ever encountered. Yes, this would even be worse than the footing at the 2001 Collegiate Peaks race and much worse than the 2002 Teva Mountain Games. I was barely able to keep the pace above a shuffle during the navigation of the mud. We proceeded to pass the 50 mile folks almost immediately as we had merged onto their course about a mile into the race. Somewhere between the 15 miles and 19 miles I passed the 2nd place guy. I had no knowledge of this because he was running slow from the effort of trying to keep up with Sean. I thought he was a 50 mile guy. I started to feel a little tired around 23 miles and slowed down somewhat because of the effort of the mud and going out too fast. I didn’t think there was any 50Kers around me and was a little discouraged because of my time. I finally got to the top of the course at around 29 miles and headed down. At around mile 30 James Bonnett cruised by like I was standing still. I had nothing left to give on the downhill, so I didn’t even bother keeping up. He ended up putting 2 minutes on me in that time!

Things Done Right:
Good training, decent taper, good hydration

Things Done Wrong:
Everything else. Went out too hard. Wasn’t prepared for the mud. Slowed down at the end when I should have been pushing.

Any Other Stuff:
Great course when it’s not muddy. I’ll be back next year. No finisher metals in the 50K. You would need to run the 50 mile to get one of those. Only overall winner and master awards. You get an award if you win a 10 year age group. Great aid stations and a meal at the end.

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Catalina Island Marathon - Catalina Island, California - March 13, 2004

Michael Shafai reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Finish in under 3:45
Results: 3:44:03, 3rd place in my age group (which says more about my lazy age group than anything!)
Website: www.pacificsportsllc.com

General Summary:
This was my fourth consecutive year running this race and so far,
was my best time. I suppose knowing the course certainly helped. If you
ever have the opportunity to get out there, I highly recommend it. It
course offers beautiful ocean views, herds of “wild” buffalo, and provides a
vision of what California used to look like before becoming overrun with
millions of people (the island is managed by the Nature Conservancy, so most
of it is still undeveloped).

Things Done Right:
The Sunday IC runs in the snow and at altitude really helped to
prepare me for this race. Since the course is 95% trail (without snow &
ice) and at sea level, I felt it was much easier than some of our Sunday
outings (’running’ up Longs Ranch Road in a foot of snow comes to mind).

Things Done Wrong:
The double cheese burger I ate an hour after the race (bad idea!)

Any Other Stuff:
After the double cheese burger, I went back to the house to
take a nap without even checking the overall results. One of my friends,
who also ran the race, went back down to the finish line while the race
director was handing out awards. While walking through the crowd, he heard
my name being called. Knowing I was sleeping at the time, he pretended to
be me and went up on stage to pick up the medal. Everyone was
congratulating him and he got his picture taken. I’m sorry I missed my 15
seconds, but that nap was priceless!


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O’Round the Loch Run - Emmetsburg, Iowa - March 13, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K also a 5K and 1/2 marathon available
Goal: race the 1/2 marathon as an early season tempo run
Results: ran the 10K due to injury
Website: HREF="http://www.iowalakes.edu/smithwellnesscenter/events/loch_run_registration.htm" target="_blank">http://www.iowalakes.edu/smithwellnesscenter/events/loch_run_registration.htm

General Summary:
Long standing annual (24th) event associated with St. Patrick’s Day. It’s a typical “town race” with many activities during the day following the race. Parade, food, green beer and good fun.

Things Done Right:
Took a low-key approach to an early season race. Downgraded my participation from the 1/2 marathon to the 10K due to injury to my Achilles tendon. Relaxed during the race to not put extra stress on the Achilles.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran for nearly 2 hours the Sunday before the race and became quite fatigued. Followed up with a rather fast-paced run on the trails on Monday. My right Achilles became tight and developed some swelling during or after my Tuesday run.

Any Other Stuff:
There are many open stretches in the race. Iowa, at this time of year, is often subject to high winds and very little to slow them down. This day was very strong with wind and gusts, nearly stood people up at times. I was fortunate to only need to fight the wind on the way out to a turn-around. I was able to benefit from a tailwind to the finish.

The folks in the 1/2 marathon were with the wind early then had to fight a crosswind for a couple miles with a four mile stretch in a headwind to finish! Needless to say, times were a bit slow this year.


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Old Pueblo 50 - Sonoita, AZ - March 6, 2004

Anita Bower Fromm reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish under 13 hours
Results: 12 hours 56 minutes
Website: http://ultrazone.us/OP50

General Summary:
OUCH! Much harder than I thought. OP50 was run in the middle of nowhere, about 30 miles from the Mexican border. Well organized and put on by an ultrarunner. Lots of rocks and stream crossings, which is unusual in Arizona, and some tricky downhill sections for which my quads are still reminding me of.

Things Done Right:
Remembered my own coffee maker. Nothing was open prior to the race, or after in Sonoita. I did the first half in 5 and a half hours, and felt great. I even ran some of the downhill sections. Kept my stuff in clear drop bags, which made it easy to see my stuff, so I didn’t waste as much time at the aid stations.

Things Done Wrong:
Forgot my Hammer Gel. Carb Boom just didn’t agree with me, and it is suffice to say that Sonoita will be much greener thanks to my efforts. I didn’t take in enough calories in the beginning, which I paid for during the last half, which never seemed to end.

Any Other Stuff:
Four more miles to the finish my #**!. However, there were lots of tell tale signs of mountain lion and bear to motivate me to keep moving. The last half is much harder than the first, complete with stream crossings, a nasty little uphill section in the last four miles, and stream beds to “run” on. Lots of turquoise throughout the race, which was kind of neat.

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Run to the Sun - Phoenix, AZ - February 28, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 5.5
Goal: Fast uphill tempo run
Results: 1st 35:50
Website: http://www.runningmasters.net

General Summary:
This is the first running of a road race to the top of South Mountain in Phoenix. It was a hit! Only around 150-200 people did the race this year, but I’m sure next year it will be a premier event. The race started out under an arch made of balloons. Three of us started out at the lead together, Rome, John and I. We were shown the way by the lead race car. I had never met John until after the event. Great guy! At only 16 years old he home schools and runs 100-130 mile weeks. Rome I did know. He runs for Central Community College. I had competed against him in a cross country meet last year. Immediately after the start we started climbing up the mountain. Rome and I were running shoulder to shoulder through the first mile. John was directly behind. After the first mile Rome and John sped up a little and I let them gap me a few strides. On the first of two downhills a little after mile 1 I gapped John and Rome slightly. They quickly caught back up on the next hill, but stayed slightly behind. Slowly I pull ed away taking cutting the tangents as sharply as possibly. I thought that John maybe pretty good at the top as there is a very steep slope. From what I had seen he had taken the steeps pretty well. I tried hard to put enough distance between us, so that he couldn’t pull away on the last half mile. The plan worked and I reached the last steep hill with no sign of anyone accept the hikers and the lead vehicle. All I could think of was “cadence, cadence, cadence” during the last part of the climb. I knew it was getting close when I saw the balloon arch at the top of the mountain. I pushed it in to a 1st place 35:50 finish.

Things Done Right:
Ran a steady race and didn’t fade.

Things Done Wrong:
If this was a goal race, I would have done just about everything wrong. Ran a marathon last Saturday. Ran 8 miles in the hills the day before. Hard track workout on Thursday. However, I don’t have the Incline Club here in Arizona, so these are the types of events that keep me in shape.

Any Other Stuff:
Great course. Felt like I was running Mt. Washington hill climb in the desert. Great organization. Aid stations were awesome even though I didn’t take advantage of them. I was very surprised at the cool pewter “King of the Mountain” running trophy that I received at the awards ceremony. The age group metals were nice as well. I opted to run back down on some trails instead of taking the bus back down the mountain.

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Mt Mitchell Challenge - Black Mountain, NC - February 28, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 40 miles
Goal: Top Ten; under six hours
Results: 8th; 5hrs:49min
Website: http://www.blackmountainmarathon.com

General Summary:
The race started at 7 AM in the small town of Black Mountain, NC about 15 miles east of Asheville. The first four miles take you through residential side streets before we cut away onto a snow-covered single track trail. After a few miles the single-track leads into a wagon road, also snow-covered. Not really easy to run, but a whole heck of a lot better than later that day as we came down. In the early morning it was crunchy. Later as the temperature rose to 50 it had turned to mush.

I was in 4th place as we left the wagon road, now we went onto the paved and clear Blue Ridge Parkway. Three runners passed me on the road. Near the top we left the road for snow-covered trail again, and I caught and passed all three on the final steep trail. They were walking. I ran it.

Coming off the top (3hrs 9min) I had a good lead on the three and set my sights on the next one ahead. As I ran down the road I asked after the distance I was behind. By the time I had reached the wagon road I had narrowed the gap from seven minutes to three. That was the end of my glory though. This was four hours into the race and I began to feel pretty wobbly. The wagon road was slush and I throttled back and endured.

Soon a runner who I’d never seen the entire race to that point came bounding by me like a spring hare. Afterwards the three I had passed going the final two miles of ascent also came lumbering by.

After an eternity we finally got off the trail and entered the paved residential roads. Initially they were so steep that I practically had to walk down them for fear of my legs buckling. A couple more passed me on the roads, but I hung on for third masters.

Things Done Right:
Trained.

Ran a relaxed race.

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t think of any.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a great race. It usually fills up early, but I managed to get in anyway. Maybe because I came in from Colorado. Nearly all the runners were from NC or a state or two away.

If you decide to run it do the Challenge! There are two races: The Challenge goes all the way to the top of Mt Mitchell and back (40 miles); The Marathon turns around early and goes the standard marathon distance: 26.2 miles.

The winner, Will Harlan ran 5hrs, 04min. This was his third straight win on the course.

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Four Peaks Mountain Race - North of Fountain Hills, AZ in - February 21, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Long Training Run
Results: 3:21
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com

General Summary:
This run was a tune up for the Crown King 50K that I hope to run in a couple weeks. Four Peaks has a ton of hills (3000ft — 4000ft elevation gain/loss), however the footing is really good so you can still have a decent time. Started talking with John on the first mile, but picked it up. John stayed in touch for a few more miles, but lost him by the first aid station (8 miles). I faded a little between 10 — 13, but picked it back up on the second half. At the turn around people were pretty spread out. I ended up about 14 minutes ahead 2nd place (Paul Bonnett) and John a couple minutes back from him.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy on the first mile.

Things Done Wrong:
Had enough to eat/drink during the course.

Any Other Stuff:
Great informal race. All proceeds going to charity. No awards.

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New World Snowshoe Championship - Luck, Wisconsin - February 14, 2004

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K is the national qualifier (5K and 20K distances also available)
Goal: Finish top 10 overall; Qualify for nationals: shoot for around 55 minutes
Results: 5th overall; 1st in age category; time of 47:30
Website: http://home.centurytel.net/luckrunningclub (info) or www.myvira.com (results)

General Summary:
Part ski trail and part golf course, the groomed race route has been described as the most beautiful in the Midwest (by Midwesterners?). Rolling hills and the winding trail make for a challenging snowshoe course. Also beautiful scenery along the river valleys on the drive to the race!

The race is one of the regional qualifiers for the USSSA National Race, this year in Squaw Valley, CA.

Things Done Right:
Able to train for many more days this year due to better snow conditions. Included short, difficult days in deep snow as well as longer, faster days on groomed trails.

Ran the initial section harder than I planned to average in order to get in a better position with fresher snow for solid foot plants. It didn’t take much to break the snow up into loose, grainy stuff that caused more slipping and off-balance running.

Things Done Wrong:
Lost some concentration and let my mind offer some “issues” during the last section of the course. The leading runner from the 20K race pulled beside me and helped coach me back into better form!!

Any Other Stuff:
I’m having a blast in recent (Iowa)winters by getting out more often on snowshoes. The running is slower and often more difficult than running roads but it provides a much better overall workout in a short period of time and more closely simulates trail running during a season when the trails are nearly impossible for regular running shoes.

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USS Frank Cable Valentine’s Day 5 K - US Naval Base, Guam - February 13, 2004

Karl Schab reports:
Distance: 5 K
Goal: sub-27
Results: 26:36

General Summary:
Running atop the world’s tallest mountain (measured from it’s base 39,000 feet underwater) at 6 am, temperature 80 degrees, humidity 98 percent. About 60 sailors and their family members (and several Army gate crashers--not surprisingly, no Air Force at that hour) came out for an out-and-back 5K on “Big Navy” sponsored by the USS Frank Cable, my home for two weeks of reserve duty. I had two goals going into this race: the first 100 finishers got T-shirts and I wanted to get one, and I wanted to at least run 9:00 miles. I’ve done 10 Ks on sub-nines, but not in tropical conditions. Well, the low turnout guaranteed the T-shirt, but the pace was not easy. I got my sub-nines, but took most of the morning to cool down, which didn’t do anything for my uniform. A Navy SEAL won the race. He didn’t let the two Army guys pass him. They took 2nd and 3rd. I was 25th out of 60, not too bad considering I was probably the oldest guy there.

Things Done Right:
Prepared well by running in mid-day heat several times in the two weeks preceding the race, so I knew what I was up against. Ate and drank responsibly (not always easy while playing sailor) the night before the race. Got to the race in plenty of time, and had a good stretch and warm up before the race started.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have maybe run faster in the first half. Ran a much faster second half. This was my first 5 K, and I only have race experience at 10 K and longer, so I really didn’t have a clue about pace. Should have tried a pacing run a week before.

Any Other Stuff:
I can refer anyone interested to a Navy Reserve Recruiter.

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Birmingham Mercedes Marathon - Birmingham, AL - February 8, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: under 3hrs
Results: 3:03
Website: http://www.mercedesmarathon.com

General Summary:
The Men’s Olympic Trials were run on Saturday on a 3-loop course through downtown Birmingham, while the marathon was run in a big loop on Sunday. Both days were unseasonably cold. I always have worn just a singlet and shorts for road marathons in any weather, but this time I wore a cotton shirt over the singlet for seven miles. Even after that long warm-up I was cold for the next ten miles after I shed the shirt.

I ran an extra mile as well. After the half marathoners split off I suddenly found myself all alone on the marathon, running about 6:20 miles. The course went up a long hill alongside a highway, before exiting on an off ramp. At the bottom of the ramp a policeman was standing, pointing to the right. He stood there signaling a right turn continually during my 150 yard approach. Naturally, when I reached the bottom of the hill I turned right. Not a peep out of him nor from any spectators. I continued for half a mile before I came to an intersection and realized I was off course. When I returned to the policeman and gave him hell he said he was directing traffic, not runners.

Things Done Right:
Started out easy and tapered off from there. Kept running and finished the race even after going off course.

Things Done Wrong:
Went off course.

Any Other Stuff:
The marathon course is very scenic and has many serious hills. Challenging and enjoyable. The race volunteers were quite good and the spectators were enthusiastic. Great race, excellent organization, good post-race party. Showers were made available in the local YMCA. Birmingham is worth a visit for the Museum of Art and Civil Rights Museum, both downtown within walking distance of the marathon start and finish.

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Rocky Raccoon 100 mile - Huntsville State Park, North of Houston - February 7-8, 2004

Neal Taylor reports:
Distance: 100 Mile
Goal: Finish
Results: 20hrs 23min
Website: http://www.hillcountrytrailrunners.com/raceRockyRaccoon.html

General Summary:
5 x 20 mile loops, with a couple of out/backs thrown in. Run around a lake, single track trails some jeep road. Small hills that get bigger with each loop. Roots are the main hazard for this run, they also get bigger each loop!

Things Done Right:
Miles 1-75 and 91-100

Things Done Wrong:
Miles 76-90

Any Other Stuff:
About 10 minutes into the run, we were all still a big group on the trail with a park road about 50 yards off to the right, it was still dark in the a.m. I could kind of see a “Texas sized” pickup truck pull along side on the road and a very sweet and powerful voice yelled out “YEEE-HAWWWW, WELCOME TO TEXAS.” I couldn’t be sure but I think it was a Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader! It was a nice start to the day, and I did feel very welcome in their event.

There are a lot of benefits to running loops. Crew and gear access on every loop and getting to know the course after the first loop are a couple.
Does the course get “old?” No.
Does one feel like dropping out when they come back to the start/finish? No.
Great organization and friendly folk!

And lastly, I wore my Incline Club shirt the whole race. I was prepared for all of the TV cameras and news reporters! Problem is, I don’t think they got the memo. Oh-well, next time...such is ultra-running.
At least they had a cheerleader!

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Teresa Taylor reports:
Distance: 100 mile ***PACER not RACER***
Goal: Pace Neal 1 loop of 20 miles, crew & volunteer
Results: Successful on all accounts!
Website: http://www.hillcountrytrailrunners.com/raceRockyRaccoon.html

General Summary:
Great race organization and people, great course, COLD and DAMP weekend. I was fortunate enough to be able to pace Neal his last lap of 20 miles! I signed up to volunteer, and worked in the kitchen all day Friday helping put on the Friday pasta feed and Sunday with the pancake breakfast — right up my alley! I was able to crew during the race, pace, catch about 3 hours of sleep and go back to do breakfast. Not sure I could have fit much more into the weekend! Neal ran nice and fast, so I got those 3 hours of sleep!

Things Done Right:
As a pacer, tripped over the worst roots on a very rooty course so Neal knew right where NOT to step. This also served as a diversion for Neal, as he worried more about me falling than his tiredness! Not sure that I had anything to do with how well he ran — PR of 20 hrs 23 min — other than a positive attitude and talking a lot in the dark night!

I think that volunteering and therefore getting to meet so many of the wonderful people involved in the race was definitely “a thing done right” and I am now torn between volunteering and running in 2005! Being a part of the feeding of everyone was especially rewarding to me — it is an act of giving and sustaining.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
I am still wondering about the noises we heard in the night! Around the swamp end of the lake we heard what I assume to be owls of some sort, and another sound we do not know! I like to say it was the alligators (which we have yet to see) but I think it may have been some other night bird. I sure do love running in the night!

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Pemberton Trail Race - Fountain Hills, AZ - February 7, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Long Training Run (sub 3:50)
Results: 3:47:41
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com/pemberton2004.htm

General Summary:
Since there is no Incline Club in Arizona I have to do races to get that quality long run that I need in my training. One of these is the Pemberton Trail Race. Its a nice, slightly rolling course with two 15.5 mile loops. I knew that I wouldn’t be very fast on this course as I hadn’t done any long flat training runs, but I knew that I needed one in my training program. I went out slow and died, but still had a decent time just because it is a fast course. I ran with Josh Brimhall for a few miles. He took off and I passed him at the half way point at the aid station. He then passed me during the second loop while I was dying (mile 16 — 26). I then was able to pick it up slightly on the last 5 miles. Josh still put on 9 minutes while I was dying.

Things Done Right:
Went out slow.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t go out slow enough. Didn’t taper (as it was more of a training run).

Any Other Stuff:
Nice course. Some good raffle giveaways. Nice prizes but only to the first people in each age group (no overall prizes). Age groups were from 15-39, 40-50, 60 and up.

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Daiva Cooper reports:
Distance: 50k
Goal: to finish my first ultra
Results: 6:33
Website: http://

General Summary:
Race consisted of 2 loops on the Pemberton Trail, located in McDowell Mountain Regional Park northeast of Phoenix. Beautiful scenery — saguaro cactus, some desert wildlife, mountains. Great weather — sunny and mild temperatures.

Things Done Right:
1. Paced myself well on the first loop — ran the first loop in 3:18 and the second loop in 3:15
2. Walked the uphills on the first loop to conserve energy for the second loop
3. Ate a turkey sandwich at the halfway point, ate a gel every 1 1/2 hours
4. Drank water for the first loop and then switched to sportsdrink for the second loop

Things Done Wrong:
1. Reapply chapstick frequently to avoid burning my lips
2. Wear a short sleeve, not sleeveless shirt — my Camelbak chafed my arms near the end of the race
3. I could have pushed the pace more on the first loop

Any Other Stuff:
A fantastic race for my first ultra. I will keep this one on my list of races to run again.

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Death Valley Trail Marathon - Death Valley CA - February 7, 2004<

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish
Results: finished
Website: http://envirosports.com

General Summary:
The DV Trail Marathon is normally held in beautiful Titus Canyon, however due to supposed snow fall the race course was changed at the last minute to the most boring, flat, dirt road the RD could find. The RD obviously hasn’t run with the IC Club, or he would realize what a wussy he is.

Things Done Right:
Took in calories primarily via liquid. Hammer gel is the best. Took in protein after 90 minutes, and felt strong and steady all the way to the finish.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have went A LOT faster. But with several of my Badwater crew members running the race, there was just too much to talk about and to catch up on. The 7 minute miles up the steep two mile climb to the finish was a dead giveaway that we all could have pushed a bit harder earlier on.
Also, should have kept my Hammer Gel in the refrigerator instead of leaving it in the same flask from Avalon 50 just a month ago, on top of the refrigerator. Fortunately the resulting stomach problems happened after the race.

Any Other Stuff:
I am a bit skeptical that the last minute change in race plans were “unexpected.” There were a dozen portapotties that weren’t at this race last year, and getting portapotties to Death Valley is no small feat.

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Tonto Fun Run - Cave Creek - January 24, 2004

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 24 Miles
Goal: Long Training Run
Results: 2nd 4:00 (got lost)
Website: www.arizonaroadracers.com (no results for this one)

General Summary:
Showed up to this “informal” run/race. I new it was a challenging course with a few thousand feet of elevation gain and tough footing. It ended up being a blast! I started out in the lead with a guy named John. He hadn’t done the race the year before either. We both ended up going straight while the course went off to the right. It was clearly marked with ribbons, but we weren’t looking in that direction unfortunately. After realizing our mistake we backtracked and found the course. Unfortunately we had lost 10 minutes. We then proceeded to pass everyone. Finally before the first and only aid station (mile 11.5) I thought we had passed everyone. Wrong. I found out at this point that Dennis Poolecco had joined the run at the last minute. I ran a fast 2nd half trying to catch him, but never did.

Things Done Right:
Brought enough gell and accelerade.

Things Done Wrong:
Got lost. Spent a lot of energy catching back up to everyone. Need to learn to follow people that know the trail. ;)

Any Other Stuff:
Way cool run! $10 donation. Lots of elevation gain/loss and great volunteers.

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Lost Dutchman 8K Trail Race - Apache Junction, AZ - January 18, 2004


Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 8K
Goal: Fast workout
Results: 1st (28:07)
Website: http://www.lostdutchmanmarathon.org/

General Summary:
Lindsay wanted to do this race, so whom am I to say “no.” Plus its hard to find trail races under 50K here in Arizona, so I decided to do this one. The 8K doesn’t have any major hills, but it definitely was a rolling course. I went out easy from the beginning. After a couple minutes it appeared that the race would be between me and one other guy, Matt Kakuk. He was ahead 50 yards or so till around half way. I bridged the gap after the half way point during a head wind. We ran to the finish together where I kicked it in hard at the last 100 meters.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go out too fast.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t taper (not a goal race).

Any Other Stuff:
Well run race with a breakfast buffet afterwards. Nice awards. Lindsay kicked it in to win her age group!

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Disney World Marathon - Orlando, FL - January 11, 2004

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: 26.2M
Goal: Get The State
Results: 3:04:14

General Summary:
Went to Disney on a working vacation. We had meetings for the Running Network (who is a sponsor of the event). Decided that since I did not have FL yet, I should do the race.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
I expected the course to be better than it was. Of the 26 miles, only about 5 of them are through the actual parks. The rest are on the roads connecting the park, so it is very boring. Race starts early (6 AM) and you have to be on the buses by 4 AM :-(

24 states down, 26 to go!

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PF Chang Rock and Roll Marathon - Phoenix, AR - January 11, 2004

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal:
Results: 3:14
Website: http://www.rnraz.com/

General Summary:
Fantastic race for an inaugural marathon. This race had nearly 30,000 runners in the various races...most of them ran the half marathon.

I knew I wasn’t in shape to run a marathon so I started off conservatively, my only goal to finish comfortably. I don’t know if was running too fast or maybe too slow!! Anyway after running the first half in 1:25 (as slow as I’ve ever run the first half of a marathon) my legs felt like lead. By mile 19 I had completely collapsed to an 8:30 mile. I persevered though for my 54th marathon finish and my 25th US state.

Things Done Right:
Started off slow.

Things Done Wrong:
Hiked four hours in the desert the day before the race without water.

Any Other Stuff:
Flat and fast... the winning time was 2:10, but there was a stiff wind on much of the course. Without the wind 2:07 would have been the winning time.

The course had some 15 or so live band playing on the course. Fantastic! The drummer of the Goo Goo Dolls, who is an ultramarathoner, ran the marathon stopping to play a song with each band! The Goo Goo Dolls were the feature band playing at the post-race party as well!! Great race and highly recommended.

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Avalon 50 - Catalina Island, CA - January 10, 2004

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 10 hours,, 55 minutes
Website: http://avalon50.com

General Summary:
Avalon 50 is run about 26 miles off the coast of Long Beach on the very hilly island of Catalina.

Things Done Right:
Ate earlier than normal the night before the race, so I wouldn’t have as many bathroom problems later in the race. Practiced on downhill running months before the race. No quad pain! Just the knees hurt bad.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have carried two water bottles. I had a 45 ounce waist pack, but it became very uncomfortable, so I switched to one bottle. Normally on a flatter course, this wouldn’t be a problem, but some of those climbs lasted two miles, so it took more out of you. I also took a vivarin at 38 miles. Bad idea. My stomach hurt so bad I couldn’t wear anything around my waist for the rest of the race, and had to carry it.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of buffalo to see, hummingbirds, and if your lucky, bald eagles. The finishers medals were really nice.

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Fat Ass 50K - Missouri Headwaters State Park, Montana - January 3, 2004

Gary Hellenga reports:
Distance: 50K
Goal: Run at least 4 of the 5K laps
Results: Ran 4 laps
Website: http://www.runmt.com/bswd.html

General Summary:
This “race” is about as low-key as it gets — no entry fee, no support, and self-timing! About 12 hardy people showed up for this inaugural event. Lynn and I were just looking to get in some miles in prep for running the Motorola Marathon (Lynn) and Half-Marathon (me) next month. The park is very quiet this time of year — I spied a bald eagle and heard several flocks of geese honking overhead during the run. It was quite chilly - minus 7 at the start, and only 1 by the time we finished. It wasn’t bad on the “out” part of the course, but on the “back” part, the wind was in our faces, and it stung! After the second lap, I had to stuff an extra sock down my shorts, because the wind was cutting through my pants and shorts - not a comfortable feeling! :-O After each 5K lap, I’d grab a sip of hot cocoa from the car, and adjust my clothing layers. At 20K, I felt a blister coming on and got some intestinal cramping (probably from the cocoa), and stopped. Lynn finished 30K, while I drove around to see the park (this is where the Madison, Gallatin, and Jefferson Rivers meet to form the Missouri).

Things Done Right:
Brought plenty of warm clothes to deal with the cold and wind. Brought along some hot drinks for between-lap refreshment. Stopped before getting injured.

Things Done Wrong:
Drinking all the cocoa might have given me the stomach cramps, but it was probably still worth drinking for the warmth!

Any Other Stuff:
Course was an absolutely flat out-and-back. If I’d tried the whole 50K, I think it would have been tough without some elevation variation to break the monotony.

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Manatee River Run 5 Miler - Snead Island, Palmetto, FL - December 27, 2003

Glen Winkel reports:
Distance: 5 miles
Goal: Finish with a “reasonable” 7M pace
Results: 36:22 69/300+
Website: http://www.bradentonrunnersclub.com

General Summary:
In FL visiting my Mom for Christmas, this run is just 15 miles from her condo. It’s a coral pathed loop through the island with an extension to the ocean. Good turnout, 300+ runners, 3rd year. I like the T-shirts, a Manatee in running shoes! Lots of older runners who are very fast!

Things Done Right:
Got there early and registered and found the porta potties without having to wait on any lines. Had 1 hour to warm-up and stretch. Checked out the start (1/2 mile away) and warmed up on the course.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t warm up hard enough, wasn’t prepared for the fast start and had to slow down. Ended up slower than estimated pace.

Any Other Stuff:
A good course, but too much pavement for me. I much prefer trails over pavement! Huge spread of food at the end with sandwiches, cold drinks, pastries and pizza!

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Honolulu Marathon - Honolulu, HI - December 14, 2003

Craig Hess reports:

Let’s just say the news of Saddam’s capture did far more for me than the Honolulu Marathon on Sunday. And if the few Caucasian supporters along the route hadn’t showed up, you’d swear you were running somewhere in Japan. The 31st running of Honolulu had about 24,000 runners of which 16,000 were Japanese. No wonder Japan Airlines is such a proud sponsor of this event. They must have had a decent pyrotechnics budget as we had some good fireworks at the start line. And as soon as I overcame my fear of sushi being served at the aid stations I was able to hold a steady but slow pace. Finished at 3:45. Very hot day. Running a mile in the tropics never really appealed to me. Running a marathon in the tropics just lowered the appeal by some factor of about 26.2.

Ran out of things to say about this run. Honolulu was marathon #37 but I still have 25 states to go. No running until 1 Feb to give the ankle a break. I hope 2004 is a great year for you; your non-running life included. Basic course info below:

Entry Fee — $90-120 ($15 for on-island military)
Linkhttp://honolulumarathon.com
Course — Basically starting a mile west of Waikiki, head west toward the Aloha tower circling back through Waikiki, then around Diamond Head, east toward Hawaii Kai and back to finish in Kapiolani Park. A very flat course with the exception of some small hills around Diamond Head.
Expo — Horrible.
Goodie Bag — None.
Medal — Average but on a string of puka shells instead of traditional cloth material.
T-Shirt — Average.
Crowds — Not many but all the Japanese banners along the way were pretty cool. Good water/Gatorade support along the way.
Start temp — Ugly. 75 degrees and sweating like a pig at 0500 before we even started. Temperature rose to at least 85 and our friend Mr. Humidity was there for the entire event.
Overall impression — Over-rated and expensive. I can’t vouch for the other marathons on the other islands, but unless you’re dead set on vacationing on Oahu, I’d almost gamble and give the other marathons a shot over Honolulu. Honolulu just didn’t seem to have much atmosphere going for it considering it is the sixth largest marathon in the world. But the Japanese sure seem to think it’s the greatest event on earth.

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USATF Junior Olympics Cross Country National Championship - Albuquerque, NM - December 13, 2003

Kita Alvares reports:
Distance: 3K
Goal: To finish in the top 25 and receive “All American” recognition
Results: 134/320
Website: http://www.usatf.org/events/2003/USATFJuniorOlympicXCChampionships/

General Summary:
What an awesome experience to get to race with other girls from all over America. The race was entirely on grass and was very hard. The course was crowded and the competition was fierce.

Things Done Right:
Qualified to be in this race by finishing 6th the State of Colorado and 15th in the region.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train enough. Next year, I’ll train more and harder.

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Anthem Holiday Classic Candy Cane 10K - Anthem, AZ (north of Phoenix) - December 13, 2003/B>

Karl Schab reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: sub-54:00
Results: 51:35 (PR)
Website: http://www.3disciplines.com/anthem.html

General Summary:
Fun run with ChampionChip timing! Anthem is a master-planned community with wide concrete running paths, and beautiful desert vistas. The race started at sunset, and we were treated to an awesome display of reds and violets as the sun slowly retreated. Oh, yes, there was a good race too. Small field, maybe 100 people.

Things Done Right:
Just about everything! Good measured pace through the first three miles. Then I started reeling people in. Each time I passed someone I felt even more energy, and I’d just go after the next one. For the first time in a 10K, NOBODY passed me in the second half! (maybe I went out too slow?) I realized I was in PR territory--my best previous 10K was 51:50--and that really helped. Also, the course went in two loops, and each started downhill and finished uphill. It’s too early to credit IC training for making the hills easier, but they were nothing like OUR hills.

Things Done Wrong:
Got to the venue very late and was dashing around with my hair on fire to get ready to run. I guess that constituted a warm-up.

Any Other Stuff:
Seemed like we were running on a movie set. The “lake” smelled of pool-liner vinyl and chlorine. People there were talking about how nice it was to get out into nature. I just smiled.

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Tucson Half Marathon - Tucson, AZ - Sunday, December 7, 2003

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: sub 1:14
Results: 1:16:36
Website: http://www.tucsonmarathon.com

General Summary:
I believe now that I was being completely unrealistic in my goals for this race. I was hoping to run a fast half marathon on the flats when I had only run 8Ks this season. Anything longer was always in the mountains where you don’t have the repetition of having to keep the same stride length for over an hour. My goal was to dip into the 1:12s or at least run sub 1:14. I started out running my goal tempo, 5:30 miles, passing the 4 mile marker in 24:02. After mile 5 or 6 I started fading slowly. I passed 10 miles in 57:10. People were passing me left and right. After pushing up the final (and maybe only) hill to the finish line the result was 1:16:36.

Things Done Right:
Tapered, rested.

Things Done Wrong:
I was hoping to not need to run long runs on the flats for training. Flat long runs are boring! The thinking was that my collegiate cross country races, trail runs and track workouts would be sufficient. Alas, I was WRONG!

Any Other Stuff:
Well run race with the exception that my registration was lost. Maybe by active.com. It was nice seeing Bernie Boettcher at the end of his marathon. There was a great group of “Bandito’s” cheering myself and Joel.


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OTHTC 50km - Ridgcrest, CA - December 7, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 kilometers
Goal: 6.5 hours
Results: 6 hours 26 minutes
Website: www.othtc.com

General Summary:
The OTHTC 50km, and also 30km, is a hilly, well organized race in the Mojave Desert. This year it grew to over 200 people. Usually it is very windy in the desert in December, and this year was no exception. A 20-30 mph headwind “accompanied” all of us, and times were all slower by about 10 minutes.

Things Done Right:
Went out moderately, and didn’t over-hydrate! Therefore kept my rest stops to under six throughout the entire race. Took E-caps, instead of S-caps, and didn’t spend too long at the aid stations. Stayed pretty consistent throughout the whole race, which was hard since I had a cold, and the wind was in our face or to the side of everyone the whole race.

Things Done Wrong:
I could have taken in more calories. I felt a little weak around 12 miles, but since I had (have) the flu, I didn’t feel like eating much. I paid for that during the next ten miles, but felt better after downing a few “magic pop-tarts” later in the race.

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Rock Canyon Half Marathon - Pueblo - December 7, 2003

Richard Joy reports:
Distance: 13.1 M
Goal: 1:45
Results: 1:50+
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/rcanwb3.htm

General Summary:
Usual course, from City Park, along Arkansas River to dam and return. Partially dirt, but some asphalt and concrete.

Things Done Right:
Training fairly regularly, some speedwork

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough speedwork, caught a cold a week before

Any Other Stuff:

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Al Garcia reports:
Goal: 2:10:00
Results: 2:07:58

General Summary:
Not a bad race. Too much concrete for me!!. Food was not too bad but the race might of had 300 people.

Things Done Right:
Organized gear and had what I needed. Got there with enough time to get warmed up out of the cold. maintained my pace until the last 5 miles.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t read the starting time right-hence, was WAAAY early. Didn’t go out fast enough- could’vve gone faster. Ate too much the night before-almost lost it!

Any Other Stuff:
There was one small hill at mile 12. I finally felt at home. It definitely beat a few people up. Course was well marked. Overall a good run.

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Mike Lloyd reports:
Goal: 1:40
Results: 1:45.10, 11th out of 25 - males aged 45-49

General Summary:
13.1 miles out and back along the Arkansas River from Pueblo City Park to Pueblo Reservoir. Perfect running weather - calm & 50's at the start, 60ís at the finish.

Things Done Right:
I didn’t take this race too seriously, drank a lot at the water stops, cut all the corners on this very curvy course.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough training for this length of run, I was recovering from a cold so wasn’t in top condition.

Any Other Stuff:
My wife, Dani suggested we do this race because she’s never done one longer than a 10K and she felt ready for it. She did great, by the way, but I’ll let her do her own report. I’ve been training sporadically throughout the Fall and did the first three fall series race so I knew I could do okay. What I didn’t know was that my right knee wasn’t fully recovered from the Ute Valley race and it started to get aggravated about three miles into the 1/2marathon. I pressed on however and was keeping a solid 7:30 pace and even had Larry Miller in my sights until about 8 miles. Then, the combination of lack of distance training and the sore knee slowed me down a bit. The last few miles were simply survival.
This is a great race and the Southern Colorado Runners do an excellent job putting it on. Also, the sweatshirt is worth the price of admission by itself.
It was good to see so much ICer participation.

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Derek Griffiths reports:
Results: 15th overall in 1:25:06

General Summary:
Went to Pueblo to cover the Rock Canyon Half Marathon for the magazine and I thought that there was no better way to get a feel for the race than to run it. I did not race it, I just ran it. Starting out slowly in the middle of the pack I began to pass people as we started out the bike path at 3 miles. At this point there were 10 women in front of me. I would catch 9 of then before the end. For a better race summery, be sure to check out the Jan/Feb issue of Colorad Runner, available Jan 1.

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Karl Schab reports:
Goal: sub-2:15
Results: 2:15
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/scrrs3C1.htm

General Summary:
Nicely supported run starting in Pueblo City Park and following various paved and unpaved trails up the Arkansas River to the Pueblo Reservoir (impressive dam). Varied scenery, perfect weather, enthusiastic race support. A nice experience!

Things Done Right:
Pace. This is a flat race except for the link trail from the park to the river, and it’s easy to get ahead of yourself. I wanted to run 10 minute miles and did so for the first 11 miles.

Things Done Wrong:
I got a rock in my shoe early (there was a lot of loose gravel on the trails) and I tried to ignore it to keep my pace. I finally stopped at 11 miles to remove the offending pebble, but the damage was done. I never got back on pace after the stop. An 8 day break for an upper respriratory infection a week before the race didn’t help. There is no substitute for disciplined preparation. My results are always better when I have completed a training regimen than when I just make a haphazard approach to the running leading to an event. This race belongs in the latter category.

Any Other Stuff:
55 degrees in December? Wow.

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Larry Miller reports:
Goal: Finish strong
Results: Finished trong

General Summary:
All was going good up till Thursday night. Woke up Friday morning and the left side of my mouth was in a little pain. Went to the dentist, broken filling and a minor infection that needed a little root canal job. No big deal. Still showed up for the 17th running of the Red Rock Canyon Half and found the course was changed yet again due to trail work. This year they ran more trails loose sand and gravel.

Things Done Right:
Rested — only did 5 miles the day before, not the 13-15 I’d normally do.

Things Done Wrong:
Waking up Friday to a tooth problem. I guess I will just have to have them all pulled and that will stop that problem from happening again.

Any Other Stuff:
This race has had many changes in course over the years due to trail maintenance. It’s always good to see the lottery money put to good use unlike in the springs were the lottery money only seems to go to the Garden of the Gods while all the other parks suffer.
On the other side this was the 17th year for the race and I’ve done 16 of them. I signed up for the missed one but because of a snow storm could not make it to the race. These things happen. You all know the white stuff that’s cold? Well that’s what we will see next Sunday.

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Scott Nalbach reports:
Goal: 1:30 — 1:35
Results: 1:32:55

General Summary:
A great run, very pretty. I saw several deer, which I rarely see in the middle of a race. The race was flat, with about half of the race on dirt and the other half on concrete. About 300 people showed up, and the temperature was comfortable.

Things Done Right:
I started off slightly slower than goal pace, then picked up the pace over the next couple of miles. I saw someone who was about the same ability that I’m at. I ran with her for a while, then tried my best to hang on for dear life (thanks Gwen, even though you dropped me).

Things Done Wrong:
I should have picked up the pace during the final stretch a little sooner.

Any Other Stuff:

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Jonathan Fitton reports:
Distance: 13.1
Goal: 1:25:00
Results: 1:24:20, 13th overall

General Summary:
Weather was quite cold before start, but warmed up quickly. Started in low 40’s, finished around 50.

A mostly flat course except for a short steep hill you go down at about 2.5 mi and up at 12.5 mi. Mixture of asphalt, concrete, and trail. The trail portions had a fair amount of loose gravel, making traction a minor problem.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:
Might have gone out a little too fast, but it didn’t hurt me too much.

Any Other Stuff:
Water/Gatorade stops every 2 miles, although the small cups only held 1-2 swallows (except when the volunteer handing out cups steps in your path and spills the whole cup down the front of you).

I haven’t been doing much hard training over the past few weeks as I recover from my November marathon. Evidently it’s been enough.

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