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2003 Incline Club Race Reports

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View 2004 race reports

Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon, Aug 16-17, 2003 - 53 reports
Leadville Trail 100 Mile Race Across the Sky - Leadville, CO. - August 16-17, 2003 - 2 reports
Leadville Trail 100 10K - Leadville, CO. - August 10, 2003
La Luz Trail Run - Albuquerque, NM - August 03, 2003
Golden Gate Canyon Trail Run - Golden Gate Canyon (Gilpin County) - August 3, 2003 - 2 reports
Joe Colton’s Adventure Run - Rollinsville - July 27, 2003
Southeast Summer Scamper - Portland, OR - July 27, 2003
Badwater 135 Mile Ultramarathon - Death Valley, CA - July 22, 23, 4th, 2003
XTerra Central Championship - Keystone, CO - July 20, 2003
Tahoe Rim Trail Endurance Run - Spooner Lake State Park, NV - July 19, 2003
University of Okoboji Marathon - Okoboji, Iowa - July 19, 2003 - 2 reports
Barr Trail Mountain Race - Manitou Springs, CO - July 13, 2003 - 7 reports
Tresspass Trail Challenge - Nederland - July 13, 2003
Duesey Days 10K - Garner, Iowa - July 12, 2003
Vail Hill Climb - Vail, CO - July 6, 2003 - 2 reports
Afton 25K Run or 50K Ultra - Afton state Park; Afton, MN - July 5, 2003
Mongolia Sunrise to Sunset Marathon - Toilogt, Mongolia (Lake Hovsgol) - June 25, 2003
Lake City 50 - Lake City, CO - June 21, 2003 - 2 reports
Mt. Washington Road Race - Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire - June 21, 2003 - 2 reports
Aviary Trail Race - Byron, MN. - June 14, 2003
Stockholm Marathon - Stockholm, Sweden - June 14, 2003
Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run - Orem, UT - June 7, 2003
Northfield Mountain - Northfield, MA - June 7, 2003
Steamboat Marathon - Steamboat Springs, CO - June 1, 2003
Casper Marathon - Casper, WY - June 1, 2003
Mt. Evans Ascent - Mt. Evans, CO - June 1, 2003 4 reports
Apple Duathlon - Sartell, Minnesota - May 31, 2003
Rocky Mountain Double Marathon - Laramie, Wyoming - May 25, 2003
Eagles Peak Challenge - USAF Academy - May 22, 2003
Bay to Breakers - San Francisco, CA - May 18, 2003
Ordinary Mortals Triathlon - Pueblo, Colorado - May 18, 2003
Bishop High Sierra 50 mile - Bishop CA - May 17, 2003
National Capitol Marathon - Ottawa, Ont., Canada - May 11, 2003
Fort Collins Old Town Marathon - Fort Collins, CO - May 11, 2003 3 reports
Fort Collins 1/2 Marathon - Fort Collins, CO - May 11, 2003
Hwasoeng City Half Marathon - Hwasoeng City, S Korea - May 4th, 2003
Flying Pig Marathon - Cincinnati, OH - May 4, 2003
Spring Chill Triathlon - Loveland, Colorado - May 4, 2003
7 Sisters Trail Race - Amherst, MA - May 4, 2003
Merrimack River Trail 10-mile - Andover, MA - May 3, 2003
Wild Wild West Marathon - Lone Pine, CA - May 3, 2003
Nagano Marathon - Nagano Japan - April 20, 2003
Top O’ the Tantalus - Pu’u ’Ualaka’a State Park - April 20 2003
Trail Mix 25K or 50K ultra - Bloomington, MN. - April 19,2003
Imperial Challenge - Breckenridge - April 12, 2003
Platte River Trail 1/2 Marathon - Denver, CO - 4/6/2003
Umstead 50/100 - Umstead Park, Raleigh North Carolina - April 5 & 6, 2003
US Women’s National Marathon Championship - St Louis, MO - April 5, 2003
US National Snowshoe Championship - Salt Lake City, UT - March 29, 2003
A-Z 20 mile run - Bishop, CA - March 29, 2003
Run to the Sun - Maui, Hawaii - March 23, 2003 2 reports
Gym at the Pavilion 10K - Bainbridge, WA - March 16, 2003
Kauai Marathon and Half Marathon - Poipu, Kauai, Hawaii - March 16, 2003 2 reports
Aiea Loop Trail - Aiea, Hawaii - March 16, 2003
Moab Half Marathon - Moab, UT - March 15, 2003
Catalina Island Marathon - Catalina Island, Ca. - March 15th, 2003
Winter Triathlon Series Championship - Snow Mountain Ranch, CO - March 9, 2003
Los Angeles Marathon - Los Angeles, CA - March 2, 2003
Spring Runoff - Pueblo, CO - March 2, 2003
Franklin Mountains Trail Race - El Paso, TX - February 22, 2003
Mardi Gras Marathon - New Orleans - February 16, 2003 2 reports
Frosty Trail Challenge - Chatfield Res. - February 9, 2003
Rocky Raccoon 50 Mile Trail Run - Huntsville State Park, Texas - February 1, 2003
Rocky Raccoon 100 Mile Trail Run - Huntsville State Park, Texas - February 1, 2003
Death Valley Marathon - Titus Canyon, Death Valley, CA - February 1, 2003
San Diego Marathon - Carlsbad, CA - January 19, 2003
Trek to 10 mile - Breckenridge - January 19, 2003
Mt Greylock Snowshoe Race - Adams, MA - January 18, 2003
Avalon 50 miler - Catalina Island, CA - January 11, 2003
Swift Skedaddle — snowshoe - Silverthorne - January 5, 2003
Christianson Trail Race - North Mountain Preserve, Phoenix, AZ - Jan.4,2003
Romero Crossing - Tucson, Arizona - January 1, 2003
YMCA Christmas Run - Boise, ID - December 21, 2002
Rock Canyon 1/2 marathon - Pueblo - December 8, 2002 2 reports
High Desert 50k and 30k Trail Run - Ridgecrest, CA - December 8, 2002
Pedal Power 4-mile snowshoe - Vail, CO - December 7, 2002
Death Valley Borax Marathon - Death Valley, CA - December 7, 2002
7th Special Forces Group Jingle Bell Jog - Fort Bragg, NC - December 6, 2002
Run to the Far Side XVIII - Golden Gate Park San Francisco, CA - December 1, 2002
North Central Trail Marathon - Sparks, Maryland - November 30, 2003
Gobbler Grind Marathon - Overland Park, Kansas - November 24, 2003

View 2002 race reports


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Leadville Trail 100 Mile Race Across the Sky - Leadville, CO. - August 16-17, 2003

Rick Pearcy reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: finish
Results: 29:50
Website: http://leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Leadville had lots to offer this year- rain, cold, hail, snow. About 200 finishers out of 500 racers.

Things Done Right:
Good intake of fluids/calories. About 20 oz per hour of Sustained Energy. No hunger, no stomach problems, no cramps.
Proper clothing. I had warm and water-proof clothing for all the rain/snow/cold.
Great crew/pacers. ICers Kim Kitchen and Rick Crawford helped out for the entire 30 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
Wimped out on the last 13 miles. I was an hour ahead of cutoff times going through the last aid station. I knew I just had to walk in to finish- and I did. If I had just walked/ran the last section, I could have PR by about an hour.

Any Other Stuff:
This year I completed five Leadville events- the Leadville Trail Marathon, The Leadville 50 mile Silver Rush Bike Race, the Leadville 100 Mile Mountain Bike, the Leadville 10K race, and the Leadville 100 mile run.

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John Genet reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: Better than last year’s time of 25:05
Results: 26:58
Website: http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Even though I came up short of my goal, I’m actually more satisfied with this year’s finish, it was much more of a struggle. There was a time during the later stages of the race when I just didn’t see how I could finish. It was about 1:00 am, the race had been going on for 21 hours and nearly 80 miles, my quads had already been in knots for several hours, I was climbing over Sugarloaf Pass which tops out above 11,000 feet and it was very windy with a light mixture of snow and rain. The most demoralizing thing was that I knew it was still roughly 6 hours to the finish line.

My plan was to just get to the next aid station at mile 86 and then reassess the situation. When I arrived my girlfriend Pat was there with Laura, who was to pace me the final 14 miles to the finish, and Laura’s husband Tom. They immediately said there had been a change in plans. Tom was going to pace me to mile 93 and then Laura would take me in to the finish. They asked what food and beverage I needed and if I needed warmer clothes. They left me no opening to voice the doubts I had been feeling for the last few hours. About 4 hours later I actually ran the last few hundred yards to the finish line. It’s possible I could have made it in without the help that Pat, Tom and Laura (along with Andre, Jason and Kevin who split up the pacing duties between miles 50 and 86) provided. I’ll never know. I owe them all a lot.

Things Done Right:
Spent quite a lot of time in the mountains at altitude including several 6-14 hour “hikes,” was well rested prior to the race and took in sufficient calories and fluids during the race. Last year I was down 6 lbs at Twin Lakes inbound and had pretty much run out of gas by May Queen. This year I was only down 2 lbs and felt like I had greater reserves for the final hours of the race. If not for the knots in my quads ...

Things Done Wrong:
Did not do enough medium intensity runs of 4-8 hours and had not spent any time on the course since last year’s race. I believe lack of medium intensity long runs was most responsible for my knotted quads during the second half of the race. Also, a training run or two on the course may have helped me to avoid a wrong turn between Half Moon and Twin Lakes which had a direct cost of 15-20 minutes lost time and considerable wasted effort.

Any Other Stuff:
This year’s Leadville effort was in part a personal experiment to see what impact a shift in emphasis from nearly all about Leadville to mostly just enjoying time in the mountains would have. I believe the time in the mountains allowed me to be well acclimated to the altitude and helped me to build up sufficient endurance to complete Leadville. However, to achieve the goal of completing Leadville in less than 24 or 25 hours, I will definitely need to incorporate more medium intensity long runs into my training schedule.

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Leadville Trail 100 10K - Leadville, CO. - August 10, 2003

Rick Pearcy and Kim Kitchen report:
Distance: 10K
Goal:
Results: finished
Website: http://leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
This race is an out and back course (the first three miles and last three miles of the Leadville Trail 100 course). We used the race to simulate and time-check the course for the 100 mile run this week.

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La Luz Trail Run - Albuquerque, NM - August 03, 2003

Travis Boone reports:
Distance: 9 miles
Goal: 2 hours
Results: 1:59:23
Website: http://www.aroadrun.org/La_Luz/La_Luz.htm

General Summary:
Race begins in Albuquerque, NM just off of Tramway Boulevard. Race begins with 1.8 miles of paved road and then 7.2 miles of dirt single track at a 12% grade to the top of Sandia Peak (elevation 10,678).

Things Done Right:
Carried water — I passed numerous runners at the water stops.
Trained on Pike’s Peak — Those New Mexicans (I’m a former New Mexican) don’t have any mountains like that!

Things Done Wrong:
Wasn’t prepared for the first 1.8 miles on pavement. That’s always the hardest part of mountain trail races for me.

Any Other Stuff:
In order to help train for the PP Marathon in two weeks, I ran back down the mountain to the bottom. They all thought I was crazy. It was quicker to run down than drive.

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Golden Gate Canyon Trail Run - Golden Gate Canyon (Gilpin County) - August 3, 2003

Mark Cafiero reports:
Distance: 10M
Goal: 2:00
Results: disqualified

General Summary:
Ok, I was disqualified, but the race was AWESOME and I highly recommend it. It went up and up through some jungly woods, then there was a short descent on paved roads, then back to the jungle to a 600 vert-foot climb/scramble in less than 3/4 mile distance. Finally a steep, rocky descent to the finish.

Things Done Right:
Ate well, well hydrated ran strong... until I messed up my knee on the descent. :( (that’s what disqualified me)

Things Done Wrong:
I really don’t think I did much wrong! When I was running, I felt really strong. And even on the descent, I had good footing the whole way, but my knee suddenly started hurting... more and more... until it was simply impossible to continue. I had to get rescued and taken back. First time that’s ever happened to me. My knee is killing me right now and I hope it will be OK by Aug 16!

Any Other Stuff:
Again, it’s really a beautiful run with a total vert gain of over 2000 ft. and attracts a lot of hard-core competitors. This was the first year of this run. I had a blast.

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Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: 10.5 Miles
Goal:
Results: 3rd in 85:55

General Summary:
Trail race in Golden Gate State Park. 2000’ of climb at between 8500’ and 9500’. Some smooth single track as well as some very technical sections. 400 meter rock scramble at 8 miles.

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Joe Colton’s Adventure Run - Rollinsville - July 27, 2003

Mark Cafiero reports:
Distance: 15 miles
Goal:
Results: 2:20:??

General Summary:
15 miles out-and-back. Fair scenery, but not what I hoped for.

Things Done Right:
Ate well the day before and morning of. Well hydrated.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t push myself hard enough

Any Other Stuff:
It was pretty boring, honestly, but great aid stations, and lots of nice treats at the end. Also there was a xylophone band at the end.

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Southeast Summer Scamper - Portland, OR - July 27, 2003

Dave Sorenson reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal:
Results: Pretty darn slow
Website: http://www.t-events.com/index.html

General Summary:
I was in the area for a niece’s wedding, and the race fit well into the schedule. It was a small race (150-200 runners) in one of Portland’s many city parks. Lots of tall trees, meaning lots of shade from the sun. The course had a few small hills, and quite a few twists and turns. This is the first race I’ve run in nearly a year, and it was an eye opener to find out how slow I’ve become. But I did manage to pass a couple of people near the end, so at least I wasn’t dead last.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:
The wedding was the night before, and of course, I consumed too many wedding consumables. But that cake was sure good. I hadn’t eaten red velvet cake in years.

Any Other Stuff:
The best advice on this race was from my parents, who advised me to not eat any dead meat found in the park. (Don’t parents always have unique advice for their offspring?) At this park, somebody has been leaving poisoned meat in the bushes for the dogs. Most of the dogs who have eaten the meat have died. Apparently the person doing this is not happy with dog owners who have been violating the leash rules. This situation actually created some publicity for the race, as TV crews were in the park doing stories on the dog poisoning issue, and they also covered the race while they were there. So some of the runners (not me) were on the local news that evening.

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Badwater 135 Mile Ultramarathon - Death Valley, CA - July 22, 23, 4th, 2003

Badwater 135 Mile Ultramarathon - Death Valley, CA - July 22, 23, 4th, 2003
Anita Bower Fromm reports:
Distance: 135 miles
Goal: under 48 hours
Results: 46 hours 48 minutes 49 seconds
Website: www.badwaterultra.com

General Summary:
The 2003 Badwater Race is a 135 mile foot race across that goes from the lowest point in the United States,282 feet below sea level, to the Whitney Portals at 8300 feet. There are three major mountain ranges to go up, with climbs over 18 miles in 120 degree heat and blast furnace like winds in your face, with equally difficult quad-busting descents. When you aren’t climbing or descending, there are mind-numbing 20-42 mile stretches of 200 degree road to run on instead.

Things Done Right:
I will start with my crew. That was the first thing I did right. My crew this year consisted of five people, several of who are ultrarunners themselves. My crew gave of themselves endlessly, even in some of my lowest points in the race. I would like to bring special attention to one crew member in particular; IC member Rick Crawford. Rick became like a big brother to me during the course of the race. It is hard for me to put into words all that he did. Like no one else, Rick could get me to laugh when I was either dry heaving, fixing problematic feet, gagging down Perpetuem,(or as I called it, “Swill,”) getting in a funk because the road wouldn’t end when I wanted it to, was hallucinating and seeing couches and corpses on the road, got over-heated and stopped processing fluids for 40 miles because I went out too fast, Rick would be there to point out the absurdity and insanity of the whole situation in his own unique way, which included his now famous rendition of ‘Baby Got Back,” his Julia Child impersonation, and the occasional mooning of me and the crew. Yes, mooning. As I was making my way up to Father Crowleys point at 85 miles, and Navy fighter planes roared over head, and I was drinking Malox out of the bottle, and lightening flashed in the Panamints and a dust storm loomed in the dry lake bed we just crossed in the nick of time, Rick mooned us. It added to the insanity that is Badwater.
Rick was an excellent pacer up the final and steepest mountain range; the Whitney Portal Road. I could write an entire chapter on how he helped get me up that road, in time for me to buckle. I was right on the “border” to buckle this year. Sometimes I was way ahead of schedule, other times, behind. In the end it wasn’t the clock that I would be fighting to the finish, it was myself. I said to my crew, as Malox and G-push dribbled out of my mouth, that I would rather finish in 60 hours than finish one minute over the 48 hour cut-off for the buckle. Until now, I never understood why some athletes would quit in an ultra if they knew they weren’t going to come in first. Now I understand. But Rick, and the rest of my crew had faith in me to buckle. I think it meant more to them that I buckle than it meant to me. So when I figured that out, I gave it everything I got.

OK. Other things I did right. I only slept 17 minutes total. I would take a vivarin before a nap or rest, so that by the time I would get up, it would circulated in my system more and it would be easier to get up. This really helped. I also had litmus paper to check the acidity/alkalinity level in my body. As it turned out, during my low points, I was very acid, which is never good for anyone. To counter that, I drank Malox, which tasted awful, but helped. I also took calcium and magnesium, boron, and vitamin D to keep my muscles from cramping. I kept very hydrated, and once again used Penta water to enhance this process.
Another thing I did right was to have my crew call my husband, who was coming out the second day, and tell him to bring ice. As it turned out, the ice machine at mile 42 broke, and the little store at mile 72 was out. Since my husband just found out that he is now on the deployment roster, he wasn’t sure he could make it out. but as I neared the top of Townes Pass, my crew told me there was a surprise around the bend. There was Tim and six beautiful bags of ice. Good thing, because it didn’t get below 96 until mile 85.

I also used Injinji socks and Hydropel and baby powder. Anyone who suffers from blisters should try these socks. Last year I spent seven hours on blisters. This year I didn’t get one blister that needed to be fixed. They look strange, and take some getting used to, but are well worth it.

Things Done Wrong:
Once again, I got a little too cranky at times, and directed this anger(at a distance) at one of my crew members who I felt wasn’t pulling his weight, and he was making it more difficult for everyone. Fortunately I had a Mormon minister on my crew who would stay calm and positive no matter what. He was so tactful and patient, and had a way of redirecting my hostility. I also had a crew member who was Islamic, so I got to hear all about these two world religions to keep me occupied.

In retrospect, I think in extreme events, whether it’s running or mountain climbing or goat herding, we all get so tired, we tend to react, instead of respond. There is a huge difference. Reacting is instinctual, fight or flight, primal, and requires no thought or IQ. Reacting can be a friend or enemy, depending on the circumstances. The minister on my team reminded me to respond, which requires a little more thought and energy, but which paid off tremendously later.

Any Other Stuff:
Some people on the course reported temperatures of 133-135. It was also humid, with little wind at the start. I actually saw several rainbows on the course, and could smell rain around mile 30. The weather this year was more extreme than in recent years, and the high drop out rate was no surprise. Some people got hailed on during their ascent on the Whitney Portal road. We got rained on. There was also a small dust storm to contend with around mile 107, and the blowing sand stung my ankles and cut them until they started to bleed.

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XTerra Central Championship - Keystone, CO - July 20, 2003

Lars Duening reports:
Distance: 1k swim, 31k bike, 10k run
Goal:3:00-3:30
Results: 3:53:10

General Summary:
The dominating part of the race is the biking, which starts at 9000ft and climbs 2000ft to the summit of Keystone mountain and back down over mostly single-track. The descent is fast, has one very technical section, and is hard on the material: I had two flats which totally ruined my time. The swim in the local pond is primarily cold and crowded, and the run is a pleasant out-and-back over rolling trails and some roads. My favorite race.

Things Done Right:
Ate well and stayed hydrated - using a diluted sports drink instead of plain water in my camelback paid off. I also got the pacing right and did not wear myself out over the first minutes of each section.

Things Done Wrong:
I had slacked off in my training (partly because of an injury, partly because of boredom) which really hurt my run time. I could have saved time on the bike by bringing a second spare tube and organizing my tools better.

Any Other Stuff: Friends came along to cheer us on (hi Sean!) which was a great motivation. On the last mile of the run supporters had brought out a hose and sprayed the runners down with water - that felt soooo nice!

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Tahoe Rim Trail Endurance Run - Spooner Lake State Park, NV - July 19, 2003

David Reily reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Under 11 hours to qualify for Western States
Results: 10:36:40
Website: http://www.laketahoemarathon.com/

General Summary:
My first ultra, finished first male in 50-59 division. Qualified for Western States 100 lottery. Gorgeous trail run on the Tahoe Rim Trail and forest roads along east side of Lake Tahoe. Elevations between 6800’ and 9000’. Their motto: “A glimpse of Heaven, a taste of Hell.” Route is basically a modified out & back.

Things Done Right:
Trained well (thanks to Margie Stauffer!) and had no injuries. Good taper and good diet prep. Positive mental attitude and stayed fairly well hydrated even though it got pretty hot. Just enjoyed the day taking photos as I went. Wrote my splits on my arm, which was quite the topic among the other ultra runners!

Things Done Wrong:
Slowed down some between miles 30-40. Could have trained more in the heat. Perhaps could’ve done a little more walking breaks during first half. Sorry, but I was just having a blast!

Any Other Stuff:
Great race organization, plenty of volunteers, great aid stations. Trail was well marked. They offered an early start which I’m glad I did due to the heat. They also offer a 50K. No extreme hills, but lots of variety with almost all runnable surfaces. Not the easiest of ultras, but still very doable for people from Colorado! A great destination — I’d do it again.

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University of Okoboji Marathon - Okoboji, Iowa - July 19, 2003

Karen Smidt reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Maintain training pace and stay relaxed (3:30+)
Results: 3:22

General Summary:
As an attempt to beat the humidity, the race started at 6 a.m. at Pikes Point on Lake Okoboji (Spirit Lake area in Northwest Iowa). The mosquitoes were ready for the early start which forced me to run the first few miles in a cotton shirt--ugh. The course meanders around the lake’s perimeter occasionally veering out to join a highway that parallels the lakeshore drive. Lakeshore Drive is mostly shaded with undulating hills (yes-there are hills in Iowa!). The miles we had to run along the highway were agonizing because there was no shade and the pavement literally swirled with steam from the early morning fog. There were a few spectators on the course, but they were mostly boat-towing vacationers surprised to see a bunch of runners on the road. Halfway through the course, cyclists from the triathlon began to pass us and offer encouragement and the half-marathoners were just beginning to gather to start their race at 8 am. After 20 miles of circling the lake, we passed the starting point and headed toward Arnold’s Park for the last 6 miles to the finish. It’s amazing how different those last 6 miles felt and looked compared to when we ran them 2 hours before. The finish took us through the crowded resort area and into Arnold’s Park peer. It was rather anticlimactic considering the 10k and triathlon competitors had already been swarming through the finish for the past hour or so. I did manage to beat all but the first place half-marathoner in, but no-one took notice that I was the first female finisher of the marathon. I didn’t “race” at all which was a good confidence builder for me. I tend to be so competitive that I forget my pre-race plans of taking it easy. I ran with the first place female from mile 4-8 and ended up surging past her when we hit a few of those Iowa hills (It’s all those Hydro Street repeats--I just can’t help myself). I maintained my position of 1st overall female throughout the rest of the race and slowly reeled in many of the runners during the second half. I was 8th overall out of 120 runners and I think a 2:56 won the overall race. They gave gorgeous clock plaques during the low-key awards ceremony and had a big street party afterward. It’s a beautiful course and a fun vacation spot for anyone looking to run in all 50 states, but I would definitely recommend bug spray and a high heat tolerance.

Things Done Right:
I was true to my word by hitting the first five miles at exactly an 8 minute pace. I let everyone else jockey for position and relaxed into my training pace. It was easy to ignore other runner’s surges as I’m used to training alone. Drank at every aid station knowing that the humidity would take its toll. After living on Guam for five years it’s not hard to remember what running in a sauna is like. I took a gel at mile 8, 13, and 20. I also got up at 3 a.m. the morning of the race and ate two packages of instant oatmeal and fell back asleep. I think that really saved me from the stomach problems I tend to suffer during training runs and marathons.

Things Done Wrong:
Pre-race: I ran a hard week up at Grand Lake, Colorado the week before the race and then jumped in the van on Thursday and drove until 2 a.m. to get to Sioux City, Iowa. Didn’t get to sleep until 12 midnight Friday night after arriving in Okoboji late and rushing around trying to find a place to eat and viewing the course. Race: I didn’t wear shorts that would withstand the humid conditions. I sweat like no other human being, so by the time I hit mile 3 I was soaked straight through and I ended up spending too much time pulling the legs of my shorts out of places they had no business being. I would have been better off wearing a swimsuit. Post-race: I would caution against trying to slalom water-ski the afternoon after a race...and every day after that for a week. I don’t think my hamstrings will ever forgive me.

Any Other Stuff:
There really isn’t any university at the University of Okoboji--it’s a long standing myth that has brought competitors from all over the world year round to participate in everything from ice-fishing to the marathon.

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Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Get the state in
Results: 2nd in 3:03:20

General Summary:
Went to IA to get the state in. Plan was to run easy and just finish. Did that. The course was rather hilly considering it was in Iowa. Very hot and humid also. Only about 100 people in the race, but there was also a half marathon, 10k and a sprint triathlon.

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Barr Trail Mountain Race - Manitou Springs, CO - July 13, 2003

Joe Cowell reports:
Distance: 12 plus miles
Goal: 2:43
Results: 2:32 I think
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Ran about 10 minutes faster than I thought and felt pretty good for 90% of the race.

Things Done Right:
Trained harder on Thursdays nights on Barr trail. Kept a steady pace throughout the race. Ate light the day before the race and drank mucho sports drink the day before. Really chowed down on the calories two days before the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t take the gravel out of my shoe before heading down from Barr Camp. Got blisters

Any Other Stuff:
Fell down into a Yucca-type plant and had leg cramps after I hit the deck. Took a while to regain composure but only got a few scrapes. It was hot for me and everyone else.

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Jordan Israel reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: 2:45
Results: 2:25:09
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Perfect weather for a race to Barr Camp and Back. Organization was great and Aid stations were awesome.

Things Done Right:
Tapered very well and rested alot the week leading up to the race. Stayed well hydrated days leading up to the race and during the race. Trained with the incline club as much as possible.

Things Done Wrong:
After the race I still felt like I had some gas in the tank. I have always said if you still feel “good” after a race you didn’t give enough of yourself to the race. I probably held back too much coming down.

Any Other Stuff:
Course was as challenging as ever, however all of the encouragement along the way (including hikers) was a very nice change.

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Dan Corbett reports:
Distance: 12
Goal: 2:30
Results: 2:15:55
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
This was my first every attempt at running a race with a significant UP. I had trained pretty good for it, but still was extremely nervous, up to the point of waking up in the middle of night most of the week before. All together it was a great race with excellent help!

Things Done Right:
Trained hard, slowed to a walk on the steep stuff, kept hydrated, and ran with a couple of ICer’s who helped me keep my pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Underestimated myself at the beginning. I started too far back in the pack and spent the first three miles trying to pass people. Didn’t push myself enough, had too much energy at Barr Camp and at the finish. Tried to dodge a hiker instead of a rock and took a nice fall.

Any Other Stuff:
Meet a bunch of really nice people from the club who gave me some great advise and helped me along in the race. Hopefully I’ll get myself out for a couple of club runs before I have to go back to school.

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 12 Miles
Goal: Not to Donate Blood
Results: 2:19:13
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Sunny warm — soon to be hot day.
Little more crowded at the start line.

Things Done Right:
Patient through the Ws.
Steady cadence.
Hydrated.
Recorded my anticipated split times — which I maintained.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have used a gu or gel at the top.
Didn’t push the decent, as a result lost almost 3 minutes from last year finishing time.

Any Other Stuff:
Another great race, congratulations to all the ICers who performed so well. A special thanks to the organization committee for another excellent job!

It was amazing — while standing in the finish area -seeing all the walking wounded.

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John O’Donnell reports:
Distance: 12 Miles
Goal: Under 2.30 hours
Results: 2.37
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
Nice day until about 1.50 miles from the finish line, the heat was like hitting a brick wall.

Things Done Right:
Plenty of fluids and gel packs. Good carb load.

Things Done Wrong:
Too slow a pace, attack mod did not set in. Could of used more rest also.

Any Other Stuff:
Had migraine carry over from Saturday.

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Robin Fontenot reports:
Distance: 12 m
Goal: a respectable finish
Results: 2:28:03
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
This being my first trip to the mountain this year, I was pleased to finish strong. I want to have my “R” so I can again be a part of the club.

Things Done Right:
Good training in high altitudes.

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Jackie Burhans reports:
Distance: 12 miles
Goal: Measure gap between my time and cutoff
Results: 3:23
Website: http://www.runpikespeak.com

General Summary:
I know this is very late but I really meant to put this in. After I signed up I paid attention to my times going up and down during training and thought there was NO WAY to make the cut off. My fastest time up was 2:50 and down was around 1:20+ but I figured I’d do it and then I’d know how much I had to improve.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the Incline Club. On Barr Trail. And lots of ICers were there to cheer each other on. As volunteers, spectators and runners it was a boost every time I saw someone from the club and they said something encouraging. Both here and at the Marathon this really made a HUGE difference!

Things Done Wrong:
What’s to complain about?

Any Other Stuff:
Just so you get a sense of what its like to be at the back of the pack...as I ran up and saw people tearing down I thought---well at least, being slow, there is less pressure. I’m not trying to win outright, be first female, win my age group or beat my PR so this is kind of relaxing. Oy. Of course I didn’t think I could make the cutoff but I did give it my best shot. When I got to the turnaround in an unprecedented 2:16 and an ICer said “You’ve Got It!” I replied: “It’s feasible.” And it was, but barely. The whole way down at each checkpoint it remained...feasible. It wasn’t until I hit the asphalt just before Hydro that I believed I could really do it. That is a LOT of stress. Does everyone already know that when you turn off Hydro to the finish line its actually slightly downhill? And I didn’t faint or throw-up. Both pleasant surprises ;-)

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Tresspass Trail Challenge - Nederland - July 13, 2003

Mark Cafiero reports:
Distance: 10M
Goal: no goal
Results: 1:55;01

General Summary:
1st mile was downhill, the next 5.75 was up, then the rest was back down to the finish. About a 1500 vert gain. Nederland

Things Done Right:
I ran it despite my conditions from the wedding I attended the night before. Passed a grip of people on the incline, never had to hike so that felt good. Went out to The Buff in Boulder after the race and had $.99 mimosas!

Things Done Wrong:
Got 2 hrs sleep the night before because I was at a wedding. Drank way too much champagne, too...

Any Other Stuff:
This was a really nice race. Great shade on the trails and a decent hill to climb. The race was small, but everyone there seemed really hard-core. Put on by the Boulder Running Company.

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Duesey Days 10K - Garner, Iowa - July 12, 2003

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: Win age group and try to better the age-group course record
Results: 1st overall and lowered the age-group record by 4 seconds

General Summary:
24th annual race on a flat, paved course around the town of Garner. The course has been certified since 1984 and age-group records are kept and posted each year on the entry form, adding additional interest in the race compared to similar “town” races in Iowa. This race, being in July, is often warm and humid, sometimes plagued with rain and lightning.

Things Done Right:
Ran a strong 1st 5K and hit the mark at my 19 minute goal.

Things Done Wrong:
Lost concentration and became complacent during the 4th and 5th miles resulting in quite a drop in average pace. Nearly missed the mark at the finish!

Any Other Stuff:


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Vail Hill Climb - Vail, CO - July 6, 2003

Vail Hill Climb - Vail, CO - July 6 2003
Matt Carpenter reports:
Distance: The last three times I have done this race there have been three courses. I am sure someone knows but not I or any other runners I spoke to.
Goal: Win
Results: A hard fought 7th
Website: http://www.vailrec.com

General Summary:
The winner, Peter DeLaCerda, blew the field away and it was great to see (or rather hear about). For those that don’t know or remember he got 2nd in the 2000 US Olympic Marathon Trials but did not get to go to the Olympics because the times were not fast enough. At any rate, after the race it was kind of funny to listen to some of the runners saying things like “this is not really a mountain running course.” What bunk! 2000 feet vertical gain in 7 whatever miles may not be extreme but it is not a road race either. Peter just showed a bunch of people that are used to running in small races with little competition where the bar is! I was glad he came (and told him so) and the more runners like him we can get interested in the sport the better! I have run Vail much faster and I know the training that went into it. The rest of us just need to train is all.

Things Done Right:
I showed, I ran, I finished. Not a lot else to say about it.

Things Done Wrong:
More a matter of things not done than things done wrong. Simply my training is not like it used to be and in sports, especially running, when you don’t train you get beat. I got beat and further I was not even in the hunt after 30 seconds. Funny thing is, with other priorities in my life now I am not going to get too worked up about it.

Any Other Stuff:
Like the last Vail race I did the results took forever. By the time they got started about the only people left were award winners. It was kind of embarrassing to win my age-group because they pulled a guy from the top 3. Why should I win my age-group just because a guy in my age-group is faster? In fact, when written like that it does not even make sense! On the other side of the coin a couple of us, including myself, got pulled from USATF results because we refused to pay extra above the entry fee to be eligible for them. Oh well, in either case — age-groups or overall — numbers don’t lie and the results show who finished where no matter how they fudge the numbers.

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Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 7.5 (?) miles
Goal: Top-3/sub-1:03
Results: 6th (US champs)/8th (open race)/1:06:36
Website: http://www.vailrec.com

General Summary:
This was a really cool race and it was nice to see so much solid competition on a great course. It was exciting that it was the first US Mountain Running Championships...more ICers (hey, Bryan Willis!) should have been racing this course since it’s definitely a climbers dream! It wasn’t as tough or steep as Mt Washington, but I like the way the course changed and there were small downhill sections to break things up a bit.

Things Done Right:
Ran the course before the race weekend, so it gave me a good mental picture of what to expect.

Things Done Wrong:
Tired, tired, tired! I backed-off a bit the week prior to the race because my legs were really tired, but they still hadn’t come around by race day. The “practice” run I did on the course before race weekend produced the same time as race day (which was run easy while talking and running some of it with a friend). I figured I would’ve taken at least a couple minutes off my time had my legs been more rested. It probably didn’t help that my boyfriend and I were camping the few days and night before the race....but hey, it was beautiful and we saw two moose!

Any Other Stuff:
The race was organized and had appropriate aid stations along the course. The goody bag was nice and the race t-shirt was cool. It was fun to have the race finish and awards at the top of one of the ski lifts. There was bathrooms, refreshments, and food at the finish, along with a gondola ride down the mountain.

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Afton 25K Run or 50K Ultra - Afton state Park; Afton, MN - July 5, 2003

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: around 2 hours and place in master’s category
Results: 2:03:31 and 2nd Master
Website: http://home1.gte.net/ultrabob/Afton/afton.htm

General Summary:
It is a hilly, 25K loop (two laps for the 50K), that winds through the park’s trail system. There is a measured gain/loss of 6300 feet for the 50K course.
Of prime concern are the hills. These rise from the river up rocky ravines. Caution is advised. At times, the footing is difficult, especially on the downgrade. But, for the most part, the trail is on well-established footing through the woodlands. There is some open field, grassy areas as well. Certain portions can be slick in the early morning dew or after rainfall.

Things Done Right:
Used the hills to help practice for this year’s Ascent. Tapered the week before as my legs had been feeling very dead from several weeks of increased mileage.

Things Done Wrong:
Decided to drive to the race on the morning of the run. Fourth of July festivities and an early morning thunderstorm (both nights leading into the race day) left little time for restful sleep. Up at 3AM for the 7 AM start!!

Any Other Stuff:
Very interesting course and lots of fun. Some of the course is on sections of the course for an annual snowshoe race during the winter.

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Mongolia Sunrise to Sunset Marathon - Toilogt, Mongolia (Lake Hovsgol) - June 25, 2003


Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 42Km
Goal: Win
Results: Won, 4:24
Website: http://www.ultramongolia.com/

General Summary:
Traveled to what seemed to be the ends of the earth to run this race. I would probably never have come to Mongolia if I had not have heard of this race, touted as the most beautiful 100Km race in the world. I opted for the shorter version of marathon (42km) distance, but was very pleased with the experience.

We stayed in nomadic “gers” far from “civilization.” Our only contact with the outside world for the week was a satellite phone that would cost $4/minute. A generator provided on and off electricity-- just an electric bulb in the ger. We had wood heat for a central stove.

The days before the race I spent scouting the course. Two days before race day I hike/ran the first half, and the day before I hiked/ran the second half. I was the only participant to spend the day before the race on the course. It didn’t hurt me. Indeed, since I knew the way it worked to my advantage. The course was at base an “adventure course.” The second half of the course is mostly not a trail per se, but just a “way” through the woods. Green ecological paint on trees marks the way.

The race begins at 0430 in the dark. The first 2-3 kilometers are on trail. Headlamp or flashlight is required, as is a full ensemble of gear, including rain coat, rain pants, space blanket, compass, whistle, course map, etc. Problem was, some of the Mongolian participants didn’t carry the requisite equip.

I settled in behind two Mongolians, letting them lead the way through the woods. I matched their steps. Once on the road, we ran into a head wind with light rain drizzle as the dawn slowly lit the way. I felt the pace was too slow, but each time I tried to move ahead the lead Mongolian would speed up, so I settled in and let him take on the wind.

After about 9 km we came on the first formidable hill--about 5 km of uphill--may be longer, I’m not sure. One Mongol dropped off and I kept pace with the leader. Just before the top I surged and kept surging on the downhill, leaving him well behind. Lessons learned from races in Colorado. In a mtn marathon your rest is on the uphill. The downhill must be relentless.

Close to the bottom of this section I stopped to relieve myself. I had plenty of lead. Afterwards, I took two steps and promptly went flat on my face after tripping on a stone. Rude awakening! Shaken, I stumbled on.

Next pass was up more of a “way” than a trail. The only possibility was to walk most of the way up as it was through downed logs and mossy undergrowth. Towards the top of the pass snow had stuck on the ground! The snow made for a slick course down. No way but to slip slowly down.

Finally, once below the steep section, the course was a gentle downhill road for about 5 km, before turning totally flat for the last 3-4 km.

I managed to come in with 4:24. Nominally a course record, and they gave me credit for the course record.

One minor point. A Mongolian competing in the 100km race was ahead of me by five minutes! He later wound up 2nd in the 100Km. During the awards ceremony I made the point of recognizing him. He ran two races. He was the winner of the 42 km and 2nd in the 100Km.

I never saw him during the race, and thought all along that I was in first. He just took off at the start and vanished off the radar screen.

Things Done Right:
Maintained rythm, ran uphill. No rest on downhill.

Things Done Wrong:
Too slow in beginning maybe.

Any Other Stuff:
Please consider running this wonderful course. The experience will transform you. Mongolia is fantastic! The international participant field is a lot of fun. Out of some 60 participants, there were only four Americans. English, Irish, German, Swiss, Aussies, Ex pats, Kiwis, Mexicans, French, Mongolians, Belgique, and on and on...


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Lake City 50 - Lake City, CO - June 21, 2003

Todd Murray reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: Sub 11 hours
Results: 10:46
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com/index.htm

General Summary:
A very tough 50 mile trail race at altitude. Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful scenery. I loved the small race feel. Don’t go to this one if you like the crowds of the Boulder Bolder.

Things Done Right:
Drank all day long and made sure to get my goal of 20 ounces per hour. Also went at a pace I thought I could sustain for 11 hours.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing major. Maybe should have spent more time up high in training.

Any Other Stuff:
This is the most beautiful course I’ve done. Really spectacular. That alone can keep you moving through the course. Some really great advice from Matt helped too. I had asked him about pace and he said to just check in with myself and ask if my pace was something I could sustain for my goal time. So all day long I kept checking in asking myself “can I sustain this pace for the next 10 hours, 9 hours, etc.” and all day long the answer was “yes.” I never felt ‘out-of-it’ and that was a good feeling.

I realize this race doesn’t meet the criteria for a “R,” but it was such a great race it needed a write up. (Matt C adds: I believe that awards ceremonies are part of the race and this race had its ceremony on Sunday so the race counts)

P.S. Rick Pearcy also did the race and it was his 50th birthday! 50 on his 50th! Way to go Rick!

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Rick Pearcy and crew - Kim Kitchen report:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal:
Results: 14 hours 50 min
Website: http://www.lakecity50.com

General Summary:
Beautiful 50 mile course in the San Juan Mountains, 60 miles south of Gunnison and Blue Mesa Reservoir. Course altitude ranges from about 9000 ft to 13,500 ft. Over 12,800 feet of vertical gain. Weather was perfect (which means “no lightning” on the high mountain ridges).

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Mt. Washington Road Race - Pinkham Notch, New Hampshire - June 21, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 7.6 miles
Goal: top-3 female
Results: 3rd
Website: http://www.gsrs.com

General Summary:
This was the first hillclimb race I’ve done since the Pikes Peak Ascent in 2000, so I was curious as to how I was going to feel (since I’m better on up/down courses). The race is held on the Mt Washington Auto Road and it’s mainly paved at an average grade of 11.5%...definitely a grind! The weather was perfect, if not a little warm.

Things Done Right:
Rested properly before the race. Ran conservatively because I didn’t want to blow-up by going out too hard in the beginning of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I would have been more comfortable if I had been on the course before the race (which would’ve given me a better mental picture of what to expect instead of just thinking about 11.5%!). I ran a little too conservatively, so next year I want to run faster having experienced the course.

Any Other Stuff:
The race is very organized and professional. There were tents at the bottom of the course (start), so before and after the race, there was a place to hang out and be out of the sun. Also, there was a lunch after the race (provided at no additional charge to the racers). It’s not a trail race, but definitely a race I’d recommend to the strong climbers in the club.

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Paul Kirsch reports:
Distance: 7.6 Miles up the auto road
Goal: 1:30 in cool weather, minimum of 1:40 if it heated up
Results: 1:38:06
Website: http://www.gsrs.com

General Summary:
With perfect conditions (for me that means 50 and light drizzle), I would have been shooting for a 1:30. With the higher temps (it was high 70s/low 80s at the start) I was just hoping to finally break 1:40. I have always struggled with this race- In tries I have never done better than 1:53. This winter I was sidelined with an IT Band/Piriformis problem that led me to XC ski instead of run for three months. I wasn’t sure what effect that would have on my endurance and I could tell it hurt me in miles 5, 6 and 7.

The only race report this virtual ICer does that I consider worthy of posting to the IC site...
Last year I had a great run (40:50) to the weather shortened halfway mark. So, I’m happy that my time is finally in the region I feel I should be, now I focus on shaving that down for next year.

Things Done Right:
-Took a 40 oz camelbak with me. I didn’t two years ago and overheated badly.
-Did 7 training runs on the Auto Road over the last two months. This helped me psychologically and helped me build strength.
-Power Walked All of Mile 5 instead of running. I think this kept me from overheating.

Things Done Wrong:
-I Need to get in more endurance runs next winter to build up my base. I felt strong but lost too much in the second half of the race. My splits over the last 3 miles were hovering around the 15 minute mark.
-Couldn’t convince the weather gods to make it 45 degrees with a light drizzle.

Any Other Stuff:
7.6 Mile Race up the Auto Road. Approx. 4600 feet of elevation gain.

By the way, hopefully we’ll see that Carpenter guy come and break the masters record in a few years :-).

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Aviary Trail Race - Byron, MN. - June 14, 2003

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: To run faster than last year and win my age group.
Results: Two minutes faster than last year and 1st in 50 — 59 group!
Website: http://www.rochestertrackclub.com/2003/events/aviary.html

General Summary:
Challenging run along river bottom, bluffs, and highland. There are even switchbacks in this Minnesota trail race! Basically a single-track trail entirely within Oxbow Park, the trails wind through mostly hardwood forest and some open prairie.

Things Done Right:
Held back during the start of the race to save energy for the steeper sections.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t take a very serious taper going into the race weekend. Speedwork on Tuesday left my legs a bit stiff and sore through Friday.

Any Other Stuff:
Some mud holes along the trail make for some interesting footwork at times. Portions of the course are very peaceful and quiet, as well.

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Stockholm Marathon - Stockholm, Sweden - June 14, 2003

Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 42195 meters
Goal: To finish
Results: 4.16.39
Website: http://www.marathon.se/stockholm

General Summary:
This is a nice marathon on the streets of beautiful Stockholm. A chance for sight seeing while enjoying a marathon along with 15,000 other runners. I am pretty sure I was the only runner wearing the Incline shirt ;). Although I met one girl from a running club in Denver.
I will do this race again if I get a chance. Very well organized and a big crowd (100,000’s) along the streets. The race started off with fireworks and they also had live music along the course. The finish is in the Olympic Stadium from 1912. That was super cool.
Served pickles along the course. Wasn’t too impressed after tasting those. :)
The weather was perfect with sunshine on the first lap and overcast with some rain on the second lap. I recommend this race if you want to do a city marathon in Europe.

Things Done Right:
I was very consistent with fluids. Drank one cup of energy drink (a taste that is much better than all other brands) and one cup of water at every aid station. Also walked through most of the aid stations to assure proper drinking. I carried a water sponge in each hand as distraction for other pain. The mental hill training with the Incline Club pays off on a flat course like this too. Resting my knee for five weeks turned out great. I had no significant pain.

Things Done Wrong:
I hurt my knee on an Incline Thursday run back in May and have not been able to do a single run since then so my training was a bit off which resulted in stiff legs in the later part of the race.
I forgot to bring GU and Gatorade (which I have been using on all my runs) on my trip to Sweden. Couldn’t find it anywhere so I had to go with different brands.

Any Other Stuff:
The course is very flat and is two laps (not completely identical). The biggest hill gains about 80 feet over a quarter or half mile. Nothing for an ICer. The whole course is on city streets with asphalt, which is hard on the legs. It winds through the city, in a tunnel, through parks and over bridges.

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Squaw Peak 50 mile trail run - Orem, UT - June 7, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: finish before it gets dark
Results: survived
Website: http://www.hometown.aol.com/jbozung/oasis.htm

General Summary:
The SP50 is a difficult loop course with altitudes ranging from 4900 ft. to 9300 ft. There is unpredictable weather, poor footing, some exposure, and difficult ascents and descents, and monsters hiding in the dense shrubbery you run through. For fun the race director likes to paint cougar paw-prints on trees to show the runners where he encountered mountain lions while he was marking the trail. Big fallen trees along the course are the result of micro bursts in the higher elevations that some unfortunate souls have encountered in recent years.

Things Done Right:
This is one race I refuse to run alone. I’m just not brave enough. So I found a running partner all the way to the finish. I hydrated well, used hammer gel and G-Push to keep me fueled, and used only one S-cap the whole way. Also took in a few cracker sandwiches that had small amounts of fat to help keep the acid level down in my stomach. It worked. After the race I took a litmus test, and my system came up on the alkaline side. I never took in over 300 calories an hour, and my stomach stayed calm. After last years string of injuries, all I wanted to do was complete this course without aggravating old injuries, and make the cut-offs. I did, and made some new friends along the way.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have gone a little faster.(Yes, even for me this is possible) I also failed to check before I left for Utah if my Camel hydration pack was working properly. The night before the race, I discovered that my precious cat that can do no wrong chewed on the hose of the bladder, putting hundreds of little holes in it, rendering it useless.( I suppose I could use it as a drip watering system) Princess drinks out of coffee cups, and when given the chance will try and get a drink out of my camel. After several failed attempts with duck tape to fix the situation, I ended up carrying two water bottles and used a waist-pack too.

Any Other Stuff:
I had a break-through this year at Squaw Peak. I found out that I too can run fast downhill if given the proper motivation.
About seven miles from the finish my friend and I heard something in the dense brush that surrounded us on all sides. It was getting dark ,and my contact lenses were getting blurry, but not blurry enough to see her eyes get big as she cautiously peered into the forest. Bear! There was nowhere to back up, the trail was too narrow and steep, so we just started yelling like banshees and hauled ass down the hill. Normally when I have to haul ass I need to make two trips, but not this time. We both got down to the meadow, a most welcome sight in this race, with the aid station people wondering what all the commotion was about. Matt Carpenter would have been proud to see such stealth!

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Northfield Mountain - Northfield, MA - June 7, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 8.2 miles
Goal: Win!
Results: 1st
Website: http://www.coolrunning.com

General Summary:
This race was a part of the New England Trail Racing Series and also one of the qualification races for the US Mountain Running Team. There was only one automatic spot for the women and that spot was going to the winner. There were a few women running who had been on the team in the past, so I knew it was going to be a tough race. After I won, I was extremely happy because I met my goal of making the US Mountain Running Team this year (the competition is going to be in Alaska in mid-September). Yeah!

Things Done Right:
Had decent rest the night before, had a solid taper the week leading up to the race, had run the course a month prior (so I knew what to expect) and put in a lot of miles in all winter and spring (with this race being one of my main focuses this year). I also stuck to my race strategy throughout the entire race, which ended up paying off in a strong finish.

Things Done Wrong:
There’s not much complaining since I had a great race and I met my goals of winning and making the team.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was well-marked and very rolling. The first loop included a little flat loop which warmed people up before hitting the first loop of climbing. The second part of the loop was a long decent and then around again for two loops and a total of 8.2 miles. This course was ideal for me, so I felt very comfortable on it. Overall, a well-organized and fun race.

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Steamboat Marathon - Steamboat Springs, CO - June 1, 2003

Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: Marathon ( 26.2 miles )
Goal: 3:15:00
Results: 3:17:07
Website: http://steamboatmarathon.com

General Summary:
The marathon started at 7:30 and was cold and raining for the first hour and a half. It starts at about 8200 ft and goes down a paved road past many farms and ranches and ends at about 6700 ft at the court house in downtown Steamboat.

Things Done Right:
I felt I was prepared since I ran a previous marathon 3 weeks prior. I was mentally prepared and once the race started the rain didn’t bother me at all. I felt that I had plenty of energy for the entire race.

Things Done Wrong:
I probably started out too fast and at times wasn’t sure if I was under hydrated or over hydrated. I struggled the last 1/2 of the race. I completely underestimated the toughness of this course.

Any Other Stuff:
The first half of the course has some steep downhills and a few uphills thrown in. The last half is very rolling and does not drop nearly as much in elevation as the first half. I was surprised how hard the course was.

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Jason Jungbauer reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3hr 30min
Results: 4hr 28min

General Summary:
This was my first attempt at Steamboat. Started out great-woke up before my alarm went off, ate a good breakfast, caught the first bus to the start, all while thinking what a beautiful sunny day it was. Half way to the start on the bus as the torrential downpour started and lighting was striking outside the bus I was wondering why I did not bring more to wear than a t-shirt and shorts. As we started the race and ran the first 11 miles in rain I felt great, my time by mile 13 was 1 hr 47 min- just 2 minutes over where I wanted to be. About 1/2 mile later I felt sick as a dog. My stomach churned with every step and my head felt like it had a nail in it. Stopped about mile 17 to throw up- after that I could not eat or drink any more until after the race. Nice course, great volunteers to be out there in the rain.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the IC all winter- first I definitely felt stronger than in any of my other races. But more importantly while so many people were whining about the weather (I even saw a few riding the buses back down rather than run in the rain) it did not phase me starting out in 40 degree weather with a solid rain, because it did not compare to the Waldo/LRR loop in February with a freezing head wind, snow and sliding backward every step you took up the last hill on LRR as you break through the snow onto ice, with no feeling left in your toes. That was the definition of misery. Everything on the first half of the race was good- ate enough early enough, did not go out too hard at the start.

Things Done Wrong:
Got sick. Did not get enough sleep the week before.

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Gina Basile reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Boston qual or whatever
Results: whatever 3:45:14

General Summary:
We just decided last minute to throw this marathon into our schedule, so the pressure was somewhat less than other races. The day started with alot of rain, but once I was wet, it really didn’t matter. Overall, I felt strong right up until the last 3 miles. The course was beautiful.

Things Done Right:
Enjoyed the race for the most part. Have trained pretty well so far this season except need to bring on the speedwork.

Things Done Wrong:
May not have drank or had enough gel during the race. Took gel twice and finished with 3/4ths of my recovery drink left. Maybe why I struggled the last couple miles.

Any Other Stuff:
Felt stronger this race than any previous marathon I’ve done. Hopefully that is is sign of better days ahead. Harry and I both won third in our age group and got very cool running shirts:)

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Casper Marathon - Casper, WY - June 1, 2003

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Get the State
Results: 1st overall in 2:54:07
Website: http://www.runwyoming.com

General Summary:
Went to Casper, WY to get the state in. Really well put on race for the first year. Beautiful Course, great weather. Would Highly recommend this marathon if you like small races (200 marathoners)

Things Done Right:
Went out slow and ran even (87:00, 87:07).

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe ran too fast overall, but will have to wait a couple of days to see.

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Mt. Evans Ascent - Mt. Evans, CO - June 1, 2003

Pete Tonsits reports:
Distance: 14.5 Miles
Goal: Beat Last year’s time of 3:05
Results: 3:16

General Summary:
I have newfound respect for high altitude running! As I optimistically put on sun block before the race, my friend Scott asked me if I was going to take a jacket. No, was my answer and oh what a mistake that was! By the time we hit mile 11 or so we were in a big time snowstorm, by mile 12 it was a full-on blizzard with white-out conditions and a wind chill factor that I don’t even want to think about. These conditions were the worst I have encountered in 27 years of running! My attire was a paltry pair of running shorts, my trusty Incline Club shirt (short-sleeve), a thin pair of gloves, a Boston Marathon cap and sunglasses, oh and that much needed sun block. If Race Director Danelle Ballengee had not driven by me and offered me a jacket, I would have been in serious trouble. As it was, I have to admit I went through moments of really fearing for my safety. Fellow ICers Elisabeth and Valerie were within my sight most of the way, probably a 1/4 mile to 1/2 mile ahead. Once we hit the white-out conditions I lost sight of them, however I figured they were in somewhat better position as they had both packed jackets.

Early Miles: My legs didn’t feel like they had much life in the early miles, so I resorted to running for 10 minute stretches and then walking for 1 minute. This seemed to help my legs kind of acclimate.

Middle Miles: Felt really, really good. My legs felt rejuvenated and I was able to abandon the 10 minute / 1 minute strategy, and maintain a consistent running tempo.

Late Miles: Didn’t care about pace or time anymore. Literally became a question of survival. My main goal was to keep moving as quickly as I could as the alternative was to freeze to death.

Things Done Right:
Keeping a positive attitude. I knew how I was pacing based on past years so I was able to accurately figure out when I would reach the finish line, and a ride back down the mountain. I remember at the 2:30:00 mark, thinking that I was about 45 minutes out from the finish. While getting pelted by stinging sleet, I evaluated whether I could endure the conditions for that amount of time. I felt that I could and the addition of the jacket from Danelle shortly after that really buoyed my spirits.

Things Done Wrong:
During the race, I remember thinking well the “Things Done Wrong” will be easy to fill out on my race report. I simply was ill-prepared for the possible weather conditions. Just the addition of a light weight jacket tied around my waist would have made a huge difference. I think the thing we all need to remember is that no matter how good the weather looks at the start of a mountain race, when you’re going to be running for an extended period of time, it’s each of our responsibilities to be prepared for whatever comes our way, especially in the mountains where the weather can turn on a dime.

Any Other Stuff:
Happy to be home, in dry clothes!

As my friend Scott has said on many occasions, “we cheated death and lived to tell about it.” Today that was just a little too close to the truth!

Congratulations Elisabeth and Valerie!

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Valerie Prothe reports:
Distance: 14.5 Miles
Goal: 3:15 or better
Results: DNF at ~14.1 mi

General Summary:
For the first 12 miles, the race was awesome. Felt great, beautiful views, and I was on course to do a 3:06 or better (which was a PR for me). It started snowing at mile 8 or 9 and was windy, but it wasn’t bad and I chided the weather as it didn’t seem to hinder my mile splits. Then the nonsplit-hindering snow and wind picked up (perhaps in response to my glib attitude) and quickly turned into blizzard conditions. Snow and ice were caked on my legs, feet were wet, and I could not look up to see where I was going because it hurt to have the snow hitting my face (I just prayed the cars could see ME). I passed on offers to partake in a warm toasty car ride, until finally I gave in. Legs weren’t functioning well, was having difficulty walking, and my PR was turning into a PW. Looking back, I don’t understand my mental state that I didn’t just suck it up and finish or at a minimum spend a few min and warm up in a car then finish, but I didn’t... Elisabeth however, armed with even less gear than I, did finish! Congratulations to her!

FYI: The runners at the front of the pack missed all the weather and had a great race! I guess I just need to get faster! :)

Things Done Right:
Went to the summit of Pikes Peak the Monday before and ran around the parking lot a bit (i.e. the altitude wasn’t bothering me at all). Was well hydrated, drank Powerade at each aid station. Had 2 gels. Kept a consistent easy pace with good cadence.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t take wind pants and warmer gloves (or rather would have had someone drive a car along the road with these items).

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Elisabeth Kaegi reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: to have fun doing a new adventure
Results: ???? too much of an adventure

General Summary:
I am still recovering from an ankle surgery and have not run longer than up to Barr all year. So, my goal was to run, not race up Mt. Evans. I told my family that rather than racing, I wanted to have a little adventure. An adventure it was...a little more of one than I had expected. The weather started off being nice. But as I got towards the top, it changed. First a little chill. So on went my jacket, over my tank top. I felt good for while. Then it started snowing and getting a little colder. Then the wind started. I had no more clothes to put on. My hands swelled up and I got “twinges” of pain shooting up my arm. My hands went numb. The wind blew so hard, I had to run backwards at times. Running backwards up a mountain with my hands up and under my jacket so that I could get some warmth from my stomach. What a way to run--But hey, to the ICer who told me I pump my arms to much when I run, I wasn’t doing it on this run;-) At first the snow and ice melted off my legs. But then it started to accumulate on my legs. It started getting so nasty, that my focus was no longer on the run, but on my health. I was getting more and more worried about my hands. I saw a car parked on the side of the road. I went up to it and asked the driver if I could sit in it for a while. And that is what I did. The driver told me that the finish line was just a couple of switchbacks up the road. I thought I had better get going. So, I opened the door and ran as fast as I could to the finish line. There I was helped into a car. It took a while for me to even start to shiver again. My hands slowly returned to normal. Fellow ICer, Valerie, who was also in the car, was so nice to share some warm clothes with me--thank you Valerie, because I know that you could have used them also! Since by the end my sole motivation was to get off of the mountain, I don’t have a clue what my finishing time was. But it really doesn’t matter.

Things Done Right:
?

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t bring enough warm clothes!!!!!!!

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Doug Laufer aka Rufus T Firefly reports:
Distance: 14.5 miles
Goal: run it
Results: ran it

General Summary:
Pete, Elisabeth and Valerie have already captured the details in their reports. Would just add that I am happy all runners got off the mountain without any problems. I have done a lot of mountain races and runs, have had a few adventures, this one is up there with the best of them. The run did cause me to reflect on another year I did Mt. Evans: I was living in AZ and came in for the race. Conditions at the top were cold and windy (but no blizzard) with wind chill was about 15 degrees. I went straight from the race to the airport, later that day I was in Phoenix and it was almost 100 degrees warmer...normally I prefer the conditions on the mountain top — this year may have been an exception, but it was a great adventure!!

I want to note that one of the runners at Mt Evans was Mike Dunlap, who is the basketball coach at Metro State. Mike has completed the Western State 100, and has done amazing things with the basketball program at Metro. I admire Mike’s work with student-athletes at Metro from afar, his approach is quite impressive and refreshing in this day of big time college sports.

Things Done Right:
Showed up, carried a windbreaker, ear wrap, and two sets of gloves.

Things Done Wrong:
No quality work, means no leg speed — great to do long miles and have a base, but to improve have to do some hard running too.

Any Other Stuff:
There was a day — late 1970’s, early 80’s when Mt Evans was THE mountain race in the area. I think the race filled at 1200 runners; there were over 900 finishers each year. Then they lost their sponsor, the structure at the summit burned down, and for a many years the race was off the radar screen completely.

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Apple Duathlon - Sartell, Minnesota - May 31, 2003

Sue Lloyd reports:
Distance: 10k run, 42k bike, 5k run
Goal: top 3 in my age group to qualify for worlds, win age group on bike portion
Results: 4th in age group, won age group on bike
Website: http://appleduathlon.com

General Summary:
Beautiful, clear day in central Minnesota. There was a slight wind, but nothing like the gale that blew the day before the race. The run is a 5k loop with one hill (the Minnesotans think it’s a big hill...we would call it a bump in the road). The bike is on a rolling course with smooth pavement and a good shoulder. Part of the course parallels the Mississippi river...very scenic. This race is one of the best organized I’ve ever done. I highly recommend it!

Things Done Right:
Ate well the day before, didn’t go out too fast on the 10k, had really fast transitions, ate and drank well during the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing! Though I didn’t finish in the top three, I was very pleased with my performance. My age group is one of the most competitive and I held my own.

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Rocky Mountain Double Marathon - Laramie, Wyoming - May 25, 2003

Bill Ransom reports:
Distance: 52.2
Goal: 10 something
Results: 11:09
Website: http://www.angelfire.com/wy2/marathon/

General Summary:
This race took place in the Medicine Bowl National Forrest between Laramie and Cheyenne, WY. Two hours after the 6 am start a very thick fog finally burned off and we were actually able to see the park scenery. There were lots of aspen groves, streams and really interesting rock formations. The 13 mile out and back route was dirt and gravel park access roads with 3 miles of asphalt. After the fog lifted and it started to warm up a little, I was able to run in my usual shirtless attire, thus avoiding that bane of male distance runners: M-NAS, Male Nipple Abrasion Syndrome. :-) My only gripe was the asphalt and the dust that was kicked up by passing cars.

Things Done Right:
For the past three years or so I’ve had a problem with severe leg muscle cramping. This usually happens to me at about the 20-25 mile mark of a long training run or race. I talked with our Bad Water diva, Anita Bower, about this when she was in the Springs a couple of months ago. She suggested Pedialite — the infant enzyme replacement formula stuff. I decided to give it a try. Since I’m a childless bachelor, I had to fight back an extremely strong bout of cold sweats and venture down no man’s land, the baby isle in my local Walgreens’s — a very unpleasant experience, indeed. But, son of a gun, the stuff worked. No leg cramps for 52.2 miles! Thanks, Anita! The orange Pedialite actually tasted pretty good, too. Now, if I can get Walgreen’s to move it to a less threatening isle...

Things Done Wrong:
I had my usual pre-race breakfast of champions: cherry Pop-tarts and a Diet Coke. Despite that and aid station goodies, I flat ran out of gas and had a major bonk three miles before the finish line. I had to walk the last two miles at a blazing pace of 20 minutes a mile. (Note to self: Eat more prior to an ultra.) But hey, I was happy — no leg cramps.

Any Other Stuff:
There was a spaghetti dinner the night before the run where I met several really nice folks. This world would be a much better place with more runners (and more good ol’ boys from Texas, of course). Yee-ha!!!

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Eagles Peak Challenge - USAF Academy - May 22, 2003

Kees Guijt reports:
Distance: 1.2 miles
Goal: prove to Larry I could beat the top female
Results: blistering 21 min/mile pace

General Summary:
Think that your pace on Pikes Peak is slow, try my almost 21 min/mile winning pace! This is the 3rd annual race up one of the peaks on the academy, Eagles peak (or North peak). The race is only open to personnel working at the base although some Carpenter guy was invited too. The trail has some flat sections but is pretty technical in some spots to make up for the almost 2000ft elevation gain in 1.2 miles. The race is started at 15 second intervals with the fastest predicted time starting first. Entries are limited to 150 people.

Things Done Right:
Went out relatively easy on the not too steep first section, the whole “Go out hard” thing is overrated! In a race with this steep of an ascent there is no way to recover. Thought I knew the course pretty well since I had done it twice in the past week. Did win the race (by more than 6 minutes.) and was under 25 minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
Did go up the course with the Carpenter guy 2 days before the race because the race was cancelled that day due to rain/snow. Probably not a good idea to do the race 2 days before the race, but it was fun to go up in the fog and rain with some snow on the ground. Carpenter never showed up on the new race day. I didn’t expect anybody else to be too close to my time. However, the 2nd starter got really close to me in the beginning so that made me push probably a little bit harder than I wanted to in the beginning. With the time trial start it is just hard to relax if somebody is creeping up. Because I was concentrating so much on optimizing the footing I actually lost the trail for a few seconds. Can’t complain too much though and it is a really fun race/course.

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Bay to Breakers - San Francisco, CA - May 18, 2003

Jackie Burhans reports:
Distance: 12K (7.46 miles)
Goal: Run as much of it as possible, don’t freeze.
Results: Sunny day, 2:02:34 16,535th overall!!!
Website: http://www.baytobreakers.com

General Summary:
Annual trek to No. Cal to visit family in Sacramento, Sonoma and to run B2B in SF and vacation in “the city.”

Things Done Right:
Nice visit with families, good home-cooked meals, great restaurant means, took Jasper on a cable car ride and to eat in Chinatown with chopsticks.
Stayed in Bay View boutique hotel 2 blocks from race start in SF. Pools for Jasper in all hotels.

Things Done Wrong:
Stayed at La Quinta Inn in Sacramento (feh!) Pool not heated--place just not clean. James got sick 2 days into trip which meant we had to walk in last two miles. It hurt more to walk than to run by then.

Any Other Stuff:
Bonnie Rait was featured performer at Footstock after the race. We put a fiberglass rod with surveyors’ tape for streamers on the front wheel of the baby jogger so no one would trip on us--it worked very well!

I know its not the race to go for a PR but I do wish people would tend more to walk on the right, run on the left.

The BEST part is seeing the folks in “salmon” costumes running “upstream"--they usually pass us as we are heading into the 3rd mile--they are fast salmon!

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Ordinary Mortals Triathlon - Pueblo, Colorado - May 18, 2003

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 5k (after 550m swim and 20k bike)
Goal: 1:06 something
Results: 1:06:34 (time incorrect on results)
Website: http://www.socorunners.org

General Summary:
550 meter swim in a very warm (hot for swimming with a swim cap) indoor pool. 10 1/2 laps (21 lengths).
20k bike on a mostly flat course (there’s a speedy downhill to start, a short hill and a steady but shallow climb to the turn around). An out and back.
5k run on a mostly rolling course, only with short hill at about the half mile out point). An out and back.

Things Done Right:
Ran with Incline Club.
Prepped like a Sunday run.
Knew the course from last year.

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe my bike is getting too old.
Couldn’t get a hotel, so we had to get up early to get there.

Any Other Stuff:
I’m not sure how my time was messed up, but the fellow who was in my heat and a half step ahead of me at the finish got a 1:06:33, while I got a 1:07:17 on the results page. They used a manual system for splits, so that might be expected with the large turnout.

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Bishop High Sierra 50 mile - Bishop CA - May 17, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal:
Results: 13:43:00 approx.
Website: www.BHS50.com

General Summary:
The race ran through the scenic Sierra Nevada mountain range. Most of the run was above 7000 feet, and went to over 9300 feet. Which is no problem for ICers who live in the Springs, but for those of us who live at 1500 feet, it was a bit of a challenge. Thre was over 35 miles of climbing, and 15 miles of flat and downhill, much of it on rocks and/or sand, which made it hard to make up time.

Things Done Right:
Even though it was reasonably cool this year, I took in lots of salt, which kept all stomach problem away. Hyrated well and took in enough calories, and didn’t over dress.

Things Done Wrong:
If I were acclimatized I would have done this course a lot faster. Wearing gaiters would have helped keep a lot of sand out of my shoes.

Any Other Stuff:
This race was very well organized and the aid stations were like going to a buffet. I only needed to carry a water bottle for most of the race, because the race director and race staff were all either runners or ultrarunners, and therefore knew how and when to set up the aid stations. It was very well marked too. The slow runners were treated as well as the fast runners, and even with my slow time, I ended up coming in third in my age division. They gave everyone red drop bags which are advertised in Ultrarunning as their goody bag, which I thought was a neat idea.

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National Capitol Marathon - Ottawa, Ont., Canada - May 11, 2003

Chaz Lalonde reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: 3:20
Results: 3:15:39

General Summary:
As it was my first marathon I did not know what to expect. I was really hoping to better my Ascent time of 3:25, with a bonus if I could reach the Boston qualifying time of 3:20.

Things Done Right:
#1. This race has pace “bunnies.” I stayed behind the 3:20 pacer for the first 5 km. Thereafter, I made certain to stay ahead.

#2. I never tried to catch the 3:10 pace bunny.
#3. I spent Mother’s Day with my mother in Ottawa!

Things Done Wrong:
1:36 for the first half, 1:39+ for the second half. I was hoping to push it for the last 10km but every time I tried to extend my stride, my hamstrings started to cramp. I was forced to take short quick strides. What is that all about? Is that “the wall?”

Any Other Stuff:
If you run a marathon in Canada its 42.2km! My brother had warned me so I had split times in km.
With only 3 thousand participants in the marathon it took less than a minute to reach the starting line.

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Fort Collins Old Town Marathon - Fort Collins, CO - May 11, 2003

Harry Harcrow reports:
Distance: Marathon(26.2 miles)
Goal: realistic 3:30 unrealistic 3:15
Results: 3:17:41
Website: http://www.runnersroostftcollins.com/Marathon%20Details.html

General Summary:
This is a great marathon course. The race started at 6:00 in Poudre Canyon. Which meant waking up at 4:00 so we could be on the bus by 4:45. It snowed the day before, but cleared up enough that there was no snow ( or very little) on the course. The temperature was a cool 35-45 the whole way which was nice and no noticeable wind.

Things Done Right:
I ran a very consistent pace until my knee started to give out at mile 22. At that point I was unable to keep my Boston Marathon qualifying pace and instead focused on finishing my first marathon. I was able to remain hydrated and kept my energy level up for the whole race.

Things Done Wrong:
Not really much went wrong. I felt good condition wise the whole course. I had been having knee problems for the past month and could have and should have treated it much better.

Any Other Stuff:
A very beautiful course. It starts at in Poudre Canyon and is a nice gentle downhill course winding through the canyon. The canyon portion lasts about 14-15 miles and then becomes very flat except for a few uphill portions. At the 23 mile point the course turns from running on the side of a paved road to a bike path with runs along side the Poudre River until you come out to Old Town Fort Collins for the finish. Well organized and plenty of aid stations.

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Gina Basile reports:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: 3:40:00 to 3:40:59 (qualify for Boston)
Results: 3:42:42.8

General Summary:
Good race conditions. Cold at the start (about 35) but warmed up nicely through the race. Good support, nice downhill fast course. Road race but had a dirt shoulder through Poudre Canyon that I stayed on most of the way.

Things Done Right:
Watched my start pace so I didn’t go all out right away. Trained well at about 40-50 miles a week with several long runs. Hydrated well. Paced well the whole race until the end. Overall, good strong race. Took over 18 minutes of my marathon times last year.

Things Done Wrong:
Will try a 26 mile long run because I couldn’t hold the pace for the distance. The last two miles I was getting passed all over the place and I couldn’t push it any more. Still had 8 minutes for my last mile to qualify and I didn’t have anything left.
So I would say wrong- Not having run the distance in training this season
- Carrying too much extra weight this season
- Not enough speed work in my training (ok, so practically none)

Any Other Stuff:
Great race course and good aid stations. Hate the 6 am start which means your on the bus at 4:30 am (YUCK!), but good run none the less.

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Keith Lonnquist reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: 4:10
Results: 4:13

General Summary:
I ran an ok race very near my goal time. No surprise that with most of my training on trails, the pavement was a bit hard on my feet.

Things Done Right:
I was hydrated about right. I had a small breakfast prior to the run & due to the availability of Gu at every aide station, I had one of those about every 3 miles.

Things Done Wrong:
I did a couple miles a bit too fast early in the race, but otherwise, it went about as well as could be.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a very well run marathon & half-marathon in Ft Collins. Eryn & I met the bus at the Holiday Inn at 4:00a.m.(!) for the drive up Poudre Canyon. We stayed in the warm bus until 10min before race time, 6:10a.m. The race runs down the canyon along the Poudre River and then at the halfway point it’s flat through La Porte and on to downtown Ft Collins. Aide stations are every 3 miles, with water, Gatorade, & Gu at every stop. The entire run is on pavement. The canyon is beautiful and it was lucky the storm went through the day before as the roads were dry Sunday morning. There were a couple porta-potties along the route and some restrooms just off the road in a couple campgrounds. Plenty of volunteers, good aide stations, nice finish line — this is a race I would do again.

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Fort Collins 1/2 Marathon - Fort Collins, CO - May 11, 2003

Patrick Leary reports:
Distance: 1/2 Marathon
Goal: 1:35:00
Results: 1:34:39
Website: http://www.runnersroostftcollins.com

General Summary:
Mostly flat course. I place 1st in the men's 35-39 age group. 45th overall.

Things Done Right:
I ran every mile at the same pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have gone with just a tank top. I had two layers, and the sun was beating down on us as we hit mile 2.

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Hwasoeng City Half Marathon - Hwasoeng City, S Korea - May 4th, 2003

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 13.1M
Goal: training run
Results: 1:24
Website: none

General Summary:
This race was promoted in the American community as a “free race for foreigners.” The Koreans are good about giving either foreigners or US military free entries to races now and them. About 15,000 Koreans and 100 foreigners ran either the 5K, 10K, or half marathon.

The race started at 1000 and it was a hot day. I wilted. By race end it was like a marathon. I became dehydrated though I drank early and often. Just a tough day in the sun.

Things Done Right:
Started off slowly and tapered from there.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t train enough.

Any Other Stuff:
After the race it was a real party. Lots of activities including traditional singers in costumes, pachon (Korean pancake) and rice wine, pounding of rice paste with monstrous wooden mallets. Interesting.

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Flying Pig Marathon - Cincinnati, OH - May 4, 2003

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: Marathon
Goal: Top 5 overall, 2:37
Results: 5th overall in 2:41:07. PR!!!
Website: http://www.flyingpigmarathon.com

General Summary:
The Flying Pig Marathon is my hometown marathon in Cincinnati, OH. It is been going on 5 years and I have participated in something all 5 years. The first year, I ran the first 10K and dropped out because I was injured (after entering the race), the next year, I crewed for my father. I ran in 2001 (2:48) and then was in charge of a water stop in 2002. It is a great marathon! If anyone is interested in doing it in the future, talk to me and I can give you some advice.

Things Done Right:
Everything!! My training was great and my taper was perfect. The weather was great. 40 — 50 degrees and overcast. I didn’t go out too hard because the first 8 miles are net uphill, so I didn’t die early.

Things Done Wrong:
I think the only thing I did wrong was I got a little carried away on the downhill from 8-15. I was running 6-6:10 and the I started running 5:50’s with a couple of sub 5:50’s and a 5:39! But, it was downhill and I didn’t feel as though I was picking it up, just going with the lay of the land. I also might have drank a little too much water, because I got a cramp at 21 (right at the bottom of the first of 3 bridges). This just also happened to be the point the my legs didn’t respond. I would say that I hit the wall because I still ran 6:40’s, but I could tell that If this was a 50K, I would have been in trouble.

Any Other Stuff:
The course for the Pig is not a flat course. First off, Cincinnati is the 3rd hilliest city in the US (behind San Fran and Pittsburgh) so it is difficult to run a flat race there. There is a big hill from 5-8 and 3 bridges over the Ohio River from 22-24.

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Spring Chill Triathlon - Loveland, Colorado - May 4, 2003

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 10K (after 1.5k swim, 40k bike)
Goal: Finish (hadn’t done Olympic dist. in 15yrs)
Results: Finished!!!
Website: http://www.springchill.com/

General Summary:
Swim in Boyd Lake 1500 meters around a “square” course. The swim course for Olympic distance competitors required you to run a short distance in between the two laps around the course. Boyd Lake was mostly empty, maybe 40 feet below normal. The water was about 52 degrees and smelled of hydrogen sulfide (yes, that stinks like rot). Wetsuits were required.
Bicycle 40k (about 25.5 miles) through a flat mostly in town course. Two laps required for the Olympic distance. Water bottles at the 12 and 24 mile point.
Run 10k on the park trail that was flat.
Event was chipped timed. This was the first year for this event. They had very few awards to hand out, they only gave first place awards to 10-year age groups. Most of the money must have paid for the chip timing.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the Incline Club, it’s good for just about everything.
Drove the course.
Got to Loveland the day before the race.
Ate and prepped just like any Sunday run.
Wore a correct fitting wetsuit.
Left the watch in the transition area.
Enjoyed the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I wouldn’t know it was wrong, if it was wrong.

Any Other Stuff:
The water seemed to be cold for everyone, but I got out a bit warm due to wetsuit. Not bad for a first year event. They were undermanned, but very helpful and friendly. Chip timing probably cost them a mint and it showed in the awards given.

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7 Sisters Trail Race - Amherst, MA - May 4, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 12-miles
Goal: Top-3 woman
Results: 2nd Female/2:11:18
Website: http://www.7Sisterstrailrace.com

General Summary:
Wow, what a kick-ass race. There’s no rest areas on this course! I was given adequate warning of the technical and hilly scope of this race, I approached it very conservatively. I ended up having a solid race and really fun run.

Things Done Right:
Got enough rest the night before and ate a typical race morning breakfast. Was well-hydrated, unlike the day before’s race at Merrimack. I was very relaxed and my goal was to place in the top-3 females.

Things Done Wrong:
Not much, but to be more competitive on this course, I need to practice on much more technical terrain on the descents (it’s very different than the Colorado trails!). My climbing felt very strong, so I was pleased.

Any Other Stuff:
The woman who won had a great race and this is definitely her course (she holds the three-fastest times on the course). I was pleased with my fourth-fastest female time, especially since this isn’t the type of terrain I train on in Colorado. There were even sections in which you have to climb up and down rocks, so it wasn’t all running! I would definitely recommend this race as a “must do” trail run.

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Merrimack River Trail 10-mile - Andover, MA - May 3, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 10-miles
Goal: Win and run faster than my GOG 10-mile race time
Results: Not too good. 2nd woman/5-minutes slower than GOG time!
Website: http://www.coolrunning.com

General Summary:
The course was forward and fun. It was described to me as being really “flat,” but there were a couple of steep hills throughout the middle of the course. The first two and last two miles (it was an out-n-back) were flat and fast.

Things Done Right:
Well, not much. I got into Boston Friday night, slept at a friend’s house, then got up the next day for the race. I knew I was dehydrated before the start, so that wasn’t a good sign...more of that later in the report.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough sleep, not enough fluids prior to race (thus, resulting in the nasty side stitches!), and wasn’t expecting the short, steep climbs in the middle section of the course (I would’ve taken a slightly different race approach). The last few miles I had to slow down considerably because of the side stitches, then the last mile I actually stopped at least 3 times. It wasn’t a good race for me!

Any Other Stuff:
The course and race were really cool. I liked the course and the race organizers made it a good time. The overall male and female winners won a homemade apple pie...yum! I’ll have to try and win next year!

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Wild Wild West Marathon - Lone Pine, CA - May 3, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: successfully guide a blind person to finish
Results: did just that

General Summary:
The WWW marathon was held at the base of the beautiful Sierra Nevada mountains, very close to the notorious Whitney Portal Road at the end of the Badwater Ultramarathon. The race lived up to its name. There was rain, snow as we climbed in elevation, more rain as we went back down, several stream crossings, some pretty hairy downhill sections, LOTS of climbing, and wind that made it difficult to breath at times.

Things Done Right:
My main goal was to be a successful guide. I had little experience guiding a blind person, and was very nervous about her falling and getting injured, as well as myself. It was slow going, as there were countless rocks, slick downhill sections, and narrow boards which at times we crawled across. The wind made it hard for her to hear me give directions, but she finished an incredibly difficult course without one fall. An amazing woman. I closed my eyes a few times to try and “see” what it was like for her, and it scared me to death. It took us almost ten hours to make it. The volunteers were great, and so patient on such a cold and blustery day. We hope to have the same success at the Pikes Peak Marathon.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing really that I can think of, all things considered.

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Nagano Marathon - Nagano Japan - April 20, 2003

Steve Bremner reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 2:49
Results: 2:56
Website: http://www.naganomarathon.gr.jp/english/

General Summary:
Woke up to rain. The rain continued steadily right up to race start, then it stopped!

Almost did not make it the start. I understood a bus would be leaving the hotel in Nagano to the race start more than twenty miles away every ten minutes up until 0700 (race start at 0905). Wrong! There was only one bus that was to leave at 0630 sharp.

I sauntered down around 0645, the last one to make a very full bus of foreigners. They were waiting for me!

The bus arrived in plenty of time. Indeed I had too much time on my hands to spend seeking ways to avoid the rain fall.

The Japanese have an annoying practice. In between the “elite runners” and the “rest of the pack” (I was #1 seed in this group!) there were some 900 runners who were members of some Japanese Federation of Sports. A Japanese runner explained to me that to achieve this elite status they only have to pay annual dues of 20,000 yen (about $200). Slow runners to dodge in the opening strides.

The first 5K were downhill though and I breezed through without trying in 17:03, and 10K in 36:00. I knew I had to put on the brakes, so when I slowed to 4 minute Kms I thought I was “okay".

I didn’t feel right after the 10K start. It is not a good sign when you are conscious of every km early on. I had to push to reach the half in 1:20. After that is was small goals: make it 25 Km, then at 30 km see how you feel, 35 km is the bridge (after you made it past 32 km and the 20 mile wall), then gut it out to the finish.

Things Done Right:
Put on the brakes

Things Done Wrong:
Ran too hard on the start, though it was downhill it took its toll

Any Other Stuff:
The race was meticulously organized. The finest detail was attended to. You can likely expect this from any Japanese race, since they tend to be very organized and attentive to detail. I particularly liked how they had large signs ahead of each table noting “water” or “sports drink.” No guessing.

Please, if you have the chance, run a marathon in Japan! You will be glad you did so! Gaijin are treated royally.

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Top O’ the Tantalus - Pu’u ’Ualaka’a State Park - April 20 2003

Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 7.5 miles
Goal: 1:30
Results: 1:40

General Summary:
Yes, it is spelled correctly. GREAT run, felt like I was back in Colorado. Started out in a slight drizzle, down the side of the ravine into, literally, the cloud that steadily increased the rain to a torrent. Calf deep water for parts of the run, goes through a bamboo forest, ginger plants, lots and lots of roots.

Things Done Right:
Right shoes, Salomon XAs, ugly but they work great. Brought water this time, last race I didn’t think I’d need any. Found humor in the weather, thought back to the runs to Barr Camp in Feb/Mar last year and appreciated the relative warmth.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing really.

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Trail Mix 25K or 50K ultra - Bloomington, MN. - April 19,2003

Curt Krieger reports:
Distance: 25K
Goal: Place in top two of my age group
Results: 1:55:46 : good for 2nd in 50-59
Website: http://www.trailmixracemn.org

General Summary:
Successful annual race which includes three races in one. A 50K solo, 50K team race and 25K solo. Almost always includes some mud and a wide range of trail types; field, singletrack, ski slope, wood chips and even blacktop and gravel for short stretches.

Things Done Right:
Ran relaxed even over some of the more difficult stretches.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t finish strong when challenged at the end of the 25K distance.

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Imperial Challenge - Breckenridge - April 12, 2003

Jonathan Veteto reports:
Distance: Top O’ the hill. Appx 13k feet (Peak 8).
Goal: Sub 2:00
Results: 1:59
Website: http://www.greatadventuresports.com

General Summary:
Not a real “R” report, b/c it’s on Saturday, but I write it up every year. Third time up the hill for me. Did the expert (long) course. They have a citizen (short) course as well, which my little bro did. The (long course) challenge consists of a bike leg from the elementary school to the peak 8 base, then a climb to the top of peak 8, and back down again. You pick your gear for the up & down the mountain.

Things Done Right:
Stayed in Breck the night before, got lots of sleep, and ate a big bowl of oatmeal with lots of brown sugar. Must be the magic breakfast. Club runs are great! Thanks Matt ! Felt strong going up the hill. It’s kinda like going up the steep part of longs ranch, several times, with tons of crap on your back. :)

Things Done Wrong:
One of those days when nothing went wrong, really. Wish I knew how to tele’ so I wouldn’t have to lug a zillion pounds of gear up the hill. (Used a frame pack, even !) Oh well. Next time.

Any Other Stuff:
One of the *best* races around. Great fun -> my friend Jari won $$ in the long course, my buddy Ben won 2nd in the boys short course, his girlfriend won 1st in the girls short course, and my brother & I both won new ski jackets (bonus !). Plus, they had at least 20 different kinds of dessert at the post-race party. Life was good on Saturday.

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Platte River Trail 1/2 Marathon - Denver, CO - 4/6/2003

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: 1/2 Marathon
Goal: Marathon Pace
Results: 5th overall in 79:24

General Summary:
Ran a 5k race in 16:50 on Saturday to make this workout a little harder. The plan was to run marathon pace (6:00/mile) the whole way. Finished in 79:24 (6:03/mile). There was a head wind coming back (out and back course), so this slowed me down on the way back.

Things Done Right:
Finished in marathon pace was the only thing I did right during the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Got competitive in the beginning and went out too hard. Ran the first 4 miles in 5:45 and then decided to back it off the marathon pace. Ran the next 2 in 5:59. Hit the turn around and then hit the wind. Going out as hard as I did made it difficult to hold 6:00 on the way back and I ended up run 6:10-6:15 on the way back because of it. Also didn’t take my glove off at one of the water stops and got it wet, this made my hand go numb at 11 miles.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was pretty boring. Started at Ruby Hill Park in Denver and ran a 1/2 mile to the Platte River Bike Path. Ran south on the bike path and turned around and came back. It was bloody cold (28 degrees). There were about 300 people in it, so it was a good turnout on this cold day. All in all it was a good workout.

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Umstead 50/100 - Umstead Park, Raleigh North Carolina - April 5 & 6, 2003

Umstead 50/100 - Umstead Park, Raleigh North Carolina - April 5 & 6, 2003
Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 or 100 miles
Goal: 50 miles
Results: 50 very slow miles
Website: http://ncroadrunners.org

General Summary:
The Umstead 50 and 100 mile endurance run is one of my favorite ultras. Alot of folks think it is easy, since it is 10 loops of ten miles. However, what makes it hard is that there are two very well stocked, friendly aid stations, which after 50 miles, or usually 10 in my case, I never want to leave. You also go by your car twenty times as well, which I often use as an aid station. And after several loops it gets quite tempting to just put the key in the ignition, look like a race official and drive off, which I did after 50 very sick and feverish miles. There’s nothing that puts me in a better mood than to be well trained and rested for a race, only to feel yourself coming down with the flu as you fly out.

Things Done Right:
Is running 50 miles while you have a fever and feel weak and can’t eat a smart thing to do? Only if you are an ultrarunner. I still haven’t found out where it says one has to be smart to run 50 or 100 miles, so not being smart would be the thing I did right which helped me finish. I “quit” three times during the race, took a two hour nap, and set a “PW” (personal worst). My end goal in all this “smartness” was to become more mentally tough so that I will have a sub-48 hour Badwater this year.

Things Done Wrong:
My initial goal was 100 miles, but as with many things in life, if first you don’t succeed, lower your standards.

Any Other Stuff:
Umstead is a beautiful course. Lots of flowering trees to look and sneeze at. There are also lots of snakes to keep you on your toes. But it is harder mentally than one would think. Adding up the times you go past aid stations, and your car, you have 40 “opportunities” to quit. Not to mention they give you credit for 50 if you go 60, 70 or more miles, so it is easy to cower off after 70 or however many miles.

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US Women’s National Marathon Championship - St Louis, MO - April 5, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub-2:48/qualify for ‘04 Olympic Marathon Trials
Results: DNF
Website: http://www.stlouismarathon.com

General Summary:
This race was run by itself, the day before the regular St Louis Marathon. There were around 50+ women who started the race (we all had to meet qualifying standards based on the past two year’s results). I believe 30 women finished the race. There were 12 women who qualified for the ‘04 Olympic Marathon Trials.

Things Done Right:
My training this winter was solid and I felt strong in the weeks leading up to the marathon. I had just raced the US Snowshoe Natz the weekend before and felt confident. I tapered for the race, ate well, and tried to get as much rest as possible.

Things Done Wrong:
Got sick!! I arrived in St Louis on Thursday afternoon, went for a short run, then settled into my room. The air was thick with humidity and it was around 80 degrees. I felt decent, but when I woke up Friday morning with a sore throat, headache, aches, and chills, I knew something wasn’t right. I thought maybe it was just the allergens and air pressure (there were predictions of heavy thunderstorms), but that wasn’t the case when I felt progressively worse on Friday and woke up race day feeling pretty much the same as the day before. I warmed up and felt okay, so I was confident I would be able to run my goal time. I started out the first 10k around 6:25/mile pace and felt comfortable, but then just started feeling really bad. I decided around the 15k mark to go to mile 18 then drop, but as the halfway point approached, I decided to drop then. It was a smart move because I took Sunday off and have still been feeling rundown, but I’m coming around. It’s just such a bummer! This is only the 2nd road marathon I’ve ever DNFed out of 15 marathons...(the other one was the ‘00 Olympic Marathon Trials and I was injured).

Any Other Stuff:
Criterium course (6.88 mile loop). Much to my surprise, I actually like the crit-style course. It made the race go fast and it made for consistency. The gently rolling course was run entirely in Forest Park, an urban park that is bigger than NYC’s Central Park. The aid stations were well-spaced, but I would’ve preferred cups instead of 24 oz water bottles. The temp at race start was 35 degrees, with strong winds and overcast skies (it made it pretty chilly!).


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US National Snowshoe Championship - Salt Lake City, UT - March 29, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: Top-5 o/a woman
Results: 1st/National Champion
Website: http://www.snowshoeracing.com

General Summary:
This was the 3rd National Snowshoe Championships and I believe only the 2nd year racers have had to qualify through a regional championship. It’s kinda cool to see the sport grow, as the number of participants more than doubled from last year to this year.

Things Done Right:
Rested prior to race day (well, this race just happened to be one week before my spring marathon, so the timing was good!). All the running in deep snow this winter made me stronger than in past seasons. Also, I kept a steady and consistent effort during the whole race. I didn’t go out too fast and by the 2nd 5k loop, I was warmed up and feeling better as the race progressed.

Things Done Wrong:
Not a whole lot of complaints here...maybe could have used more sleep the week and night before the race.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was pretty fair, even though some people complained that it was at altitude. It was actually a very fair test, because the climbs were not that steep (like the typical Colorado courses). The long and fast descents gave an advantage with people with leg speed, so this favored the runners. The day was sunny, with mild temps. The race management could’ve done a better job with on-site race registration, awards, and local pre-race publicity.

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A-Z 20 mile run - Bishop, CA - March 29, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 20 miles
Goal: finish injury free under 4 hours
Results: First place female overall
Website: http://sierraevents.com

General Summary:
This run was called the A-Z run because it ran from the Aqueduct to a place called Zurich. I used it as a final training run for the Umstead 100 the next week. The course was relatively flat, although the road was rough and uneven at times. A lot of the Badwater 135 crowd was there, so there were a lot of familiar faces.

Things Done Right:
Ran slow and steady. Ran the last 10 miles 14 minutes faster than my first. I hydrated well, fueled, and came in strong.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t go out hard enough. I could have done this course alot faster, but didn’t really push until I found out I was in the lead.

Any Other Stuff:
I made a wrong turn which added five minutes to my time.

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Run to the Sun - Maui, Hawaii - March 23, 2003

Tom Kelecy reports:
Distance: 36.2 miles
Goal: Relax, We’re on Vacation
Results: 10th overall, 3rd 40-49, time of 7 hrs 4 min 54 sec
Website: http://www.virr.com

General Summary:
This was a little toughy. The race started at 4:30 am in Kahului, one of the main cities on Maui and at near sea level, and finished 36.2 miles and 10,023 vertical feet later on top of Haleakala, a dormant volcano and the eastern half of the island. There was a 10 hour time limit.

Laura and I ran the first 12 miles together, and the last 12 miles together. In between I tried to pick it up (forgetting that we were on vacation), but every time I looked back, there she was. I finally chilled and we slogged through the last mile together, crossing the finish line hold hands in a time of 7 hrs, 4 min, 54 sec. Isn’t that a sweet way to complete a nice relaxing vacation?

I plan to write up a more detailed story in the near future, and describe how we managed to squeeze this in while sunning, snorkeling, hiking, eating, sleeping, hula dancing (wink-wink-nod-nod), and a host of other tropical-type activities.

Mahalo to the Divine Kahuna for Vacations!
Most of the runners in the race were with the H.U.R.T (Hawaiian Ultra-Running Club), and came over from Oahu to do the race. A total of 46 men and 16 women ran the race.

Things Done Right:
Enjoyed my first vacation to Hawaii

Things Done Wrong:
Only spent 10 days there Hawaii. The 10 hour race time limit and our return flight schedule (10 pm that night) prevented us from spending more time there.

Any Other Stuff:
Course:
36.2 mile point to point, all on hard road surface, starting at around sea level and finishing at 10,023 ft above sea level.

Support:
The course support was great, with aid stations spaced aver 4 or so miles through the first 12 miles, then every 2 miles. The last couple of aid stations might have been more like one mile apart. Each station had both water and Gatorade, and later stations had Hammer Gel and other food items (salty pretzels...). The aid station workers and spectators were marvelous all along the route. There was one drop bag location at the 26.2 mile mark (elev about 7,000 ft), and at the finish.

Weather:
We ran in the dark for the first 10-12 miles, and the temperatures were perfect (mid-upper 60’s). As the sun came up, the increasing temperatures under the relatively clear skies were compensated somewhat by the cooling effects as we gained altitude. It was a bit windy on top at the finish, but they provided blankets, warm soup, drinks, etc. Nice touch.

Other:
They handed out the awards right when you crossed the finish line. This so you didn’t have to attend an awards ceremony afterwards. As it was, they took us from the top down to a picnic at a school down lower in one of the small towns. They had a shower (not too private), pizza, soda, cookies, live music, and free massages. Laura and I hung out there afterwards socializing, before returning the friends house we were staying at to pack and head off to the airport for the return home.

Registration:
Upon registration, we received some instructions on the race, and some of the statistics of previous races. Race results were waiting for me in my e-mail by the time we arrived home in Colorado Springs the next afternoon.

Aloha

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Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: 36.2 miles
Goal: Finish my first ultra
Results: 7 hrs 4 mins 54 secs; 1st woman overall

General Summary:
Don’t you hate those web sites where they make it sound like a challenge you just can’t pass up?!? I’ll give Craig Hess the blame/credit for this one. He could have let Tom remain blissfully ignorant of the fact that this race was going to be held during our vacation and, gee, we just happened to be on Maui, right in the neighborhood at race time! But NNNOOOOO! He had to send Tom the web site and Tom had to pass it on to me and I had to open it up and read it. That was all it took. An ultra had been on my list of new things that I want to try, so why not do it up right with an all uphill run in Hawaii! It was a tough one, but very well supported and again, that aloha spirit prevailed!

Things Done Right:
Training on our hills and at our altitude was a definite advantage! Especially the long run/grocery shopping/shoveling snow training day. That put us right where we needed to be! I got some new Reebok running shoes from CRC (thanks John & company) that worked really well. Tried to eat and drink as much as possible at all the aid stations. Wore a hat and had the right things in my drop bag at the 2 drop bag locations. I told Tom I didn’t think it was a good idea for him to wear his Speedo and rubber duckie life preserver, and the arm floaties were definitely out! I wasn’t sure about the mask, snorkel and fins-I let him make his own decision on that one. We had a lot of good relaxing time, just hiking and swimming with the fishes. Ate a lot of good food and made our vacation a priority.

Things Done Wrong:
We probably didn’t do long enough runs and we didn’t run on pavement at all. That took a toll on my legs quickly.

Any Other Stuff:
The course started (at 4:30 a.m.) at sea level and ended at 10,023’ on the top of Haleakala. We ran the first 18 or so miles on flat and rolling hills (miles 12-15 were STEEP hills) through some nice residential areas (that we could actually see when it got light). The roads were not closed to traffic so we had to stay to the left at all times. Tom was kind enough to keep me company through the flats and until it got light. He set a brisk pace at the beginning and I wanted to try to stay with him. He pulled ahead, but I tried to keep him in sight as much as I could because I didn’t want him to have to wait for me too long at the top. I sort of took my cues from him (for pacing and eating/drinking) because I’d never run this far before and didn’t know quite what to expect. It was fun watching him pick off other runners. We talked with some as we met them on the course and the ones from sea level were having a hard time breathing as we got up in altitude. Other runners’ family and friends would drive by at regular intervals and cheer us on. The aid stations were well stocked with water, Gatorade, Coke, then later with HammerGel, cookies, pretzels, and lots of very kind people! There was a 3-person team competition too so the aid station workers would ask if we were on a team or doing it “solo.” As the race went higher, the scenery became part of it. We could see ocean, fields, other islands, and the barrenness of the volcano we were on. Bike tours are a popular activity. People coast down the mountain on bikes. Some of them cheered us on too and seemed to be having a good time. With about 8 miles to go, my quads and hip flexors got so tight from the constant uphill that I had this shuffle thing going on. It was difficult to lift my feet. But with this shuffle, I stayed close enough to Tom that he took pity on me (and since he is the caring, wonderful husband that he is) and kept me company until the finish. We alternately walked and jogged the last 5 miles and crossed the finish line holding hands. It was windy up at the top, but they wrapped us in blankets and gave us hot soup. Tom finished 3rd in his age group. To show you tough that age group was, we were 9th and 10th overall. All the awards were hand made. Tom got a pottery medal hung on a cord made from Hawaiian cloth. I got a beautiful pottery bowl with a girl running up a mountain on it. The woman who made it actually gave it to me. We hitched a ride to the picnic where we got a massage, had a shower (outdoors!), pizza, pop, and Oreos! Then we hitched another ride back to get our car. I think one of the funnest things was talking with all the wonderful people we met there. It was hard to leave, but we had to fly out that night. We slept pretty contentedly on the plane!

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Gym at the Pavilion 10K - Bainbridge, WA - 3/16/03

Steve Mischel reports:
Distance: 10K
Results: 56:35

General Summary:
This qualifies as a Non-“R” report because the race scheduled for Sunday was cancelled two days earlier. I was surprised at the cancellation because A) I did not get the word about the cancellation prior to waking at 4:00AM to catch the first ferry from Seattle to Bainbridge Isl. and B) more importantly, the reason the race was called off was because of the wet weather. To put into perspective, the year I moved away from Seattle (1999) it rained 90 consecutive days during the winter months. Therefore, rain is truly not a big issue in that region as far as trail running goes, but apparently the race director thought so. At least I got a t-shirt for my troubles and I did meet an older gentleman who ran 2 minutes shy of the coarse record for his age group during the 2001 PPA; he was 70 years old and his 9 year-old daughter was with him too!!! I mentioned that I run with the Incline Club, he was very impressed with that knowledge and it reminded me of how lucky I am to be able run with such a prestigious group of people. He and about four others didn’t get the word about the cancellation either and showed up to compete.

Anyway, we decided to run the coarse since my friend and I made the trip. The race coordinator, who was a very nice guy, gave us a general description of the coarse and a sketchy map to help us along the way. I think the map made things more complicated since it seemed to conflict with trail maps embedded on wood posts that the park had installed at various intersections. We were pretty much confused within 5 minutes of the start and had to back track almost to where we began to get a sense of where the coarse would have existed, had the race occurred. To make a long story short, my friend and I got totally off-coarse and found ourselves on private property. We turned a 10K run into about an 8K because we bailed early and eventually find our way back to our car to call it a day.

It was unfortunate the race was not run because the conditions were as perfect as they possibly could be, cool temps, an occasional rain drop, and great trails through tall fir trees. Maybe next year.

Things Done Right:
I ran regardless.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t check the event web site prior to race day.

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Kauai Marathon and Half Marathon - Poipu, Kauai, Hawaii - March 16, 2003

Tom Kelecy reports:
Distance: Half Marathon
Goal: Relax, I’m on Vacation
Results: 2nd Overall in 1 hr 30 min 5 sec
Website: http://www.kauaimarathon.com

General Summary:
Laura and I had planned on doing the full marathon, but when we found out about the “Run to the Sun” race on Maui on March 23rd, and realized that we would be in that neighborhood on that date (though leaving for home later that night), so for this race we decided to do the half marathon instead. This, so as to save some rest and relaxation for the 36.2 miler the following week. After all, we were on vacation

I managed to keep the leaders in site for most of the race, but occasionally lost them in the marathoners who had started 10 minutes before us (half marathoners). A mile or two from the end I lost site of the leader, but noted that I was gaining on second place. The last mile or so was mostly up-hill, and I gained second place within the last mile. The winner (Ian Johnson) finished a couple of minutes ahead of me in a time of 1 hr 28 min 4 sec. My second place finish was good for 1 hr 30 min 5 sec.

There were about 80 total who ran the half marathon, and about the same number for the marathon.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t try wearing my snorkel, fins, Speedo and rubber ducky life preserver.

Things Done Wrong:
Forgot to relax, and that we were on vacation.

Any Other Stuff:
Course:
Beautiful but hilly out and back on dirt roads through a coffee plantation. The marathon did two out and backs. The finish was up-hill.

Weather:
The marathon started at 6:30 am, and the half marathon at 6:40 am, so it was relatively nice at the start. Going out, it began warming up and, with the wind at our backs, began to get a little warm as the temperatures increased (low 70’s deg F?). On the return we had the cooling head-wind, and a well timed cloud cover developed. We even got a little bit of a shower just before the finish.

Support:
The aid stations were adequate, providing water and Gatorade. I think they might have also provided some food items later for the marathoners. Aid station volunteers were great, supportive, as were thespectators and some of the other runners.

General:
A nice, small race. I understand they plan to expand next year’s race to accommodate several hundred. We couldn’t find a lot of details on the race web site, and so didn’t really know what we were getting into. Maybe they will improve this for next year.

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Laura Kelecy reports:
Distance: Half Marathon
Goal: Run for Fun!
Results: 1:38 2nd woman overall

General Summary:
First annual Kauai Marathon and Half for the Garden Island Road Runners. There was not much information on their website so we didn’t know what to expect, but, hey, we were on vacation, so we didn’t care. We just wanted a cool shirt.

Things Done Right:
Choosing to do the half marathon rather than the marathon. Our altitude training/building base mileage paid off. Relaxed, enjoyed the scenery.

Things Done Wrong:
No speed training this early in the year.

Any Other Stuff:
This event turned out to be well organized despite the lack of information prior to it. The course was on a (red) dirt road through a coffee plantation. The coffee flowers smelled sweet. Lots of hills. Start time was 6:30 a.m. and the sun came out so I figured it was going to get really warm, but it went under the clouds so stayed cool for us 1/2 marathoners. The course was an out and back for the half, then out and back again for the marathon. We had a great time talking with people after the race, soaking up that aloha spirit. The awards were plaques for overall and wooden pineapples for age group awards. I think the age groups were something like women under 45 and over 45 and men under 40 and over 40. That was a little different. Our socks and shoes are STILL a beautiful red color!

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Aiea Loop Trail - Aiea, Hawaii - March 16, 2003

Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 4.5 miles
Goal: under 1 hour
Results: success

General Summary:
Started off cool but HIGH humidity. Route covered with roots and lots of mud. Started raining about 30 minutes before the run. About 100 people there. Really layed back (In true Hawaiian style). Had fun, finished covered with red mud. Heat and humidity were rough on us.

Things Done Right:
Kept a steady pace.

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Moab Half Marathon - Moab, UT - March 15, 2003

John Monk reports:
Distance: 13.1 Miles
Goal: 2 hr
Results: 1 hr 54 min
Website: http://www.moabhalfmarathon.org/

General Summary:
A really fun event, but too flat! The format of the race was a little strange; we were bussed out 11 miles on HWY 128 along the Colorado River at 7:30 AM, but then had to wait until 10:00 AM for the race to start. Amazing scenery!

Things Done Right:
Running with the incline club when I can!

Things Done Wrong:
The canyon was cold — I needed more clothes before the start to stay warm! I should have run on the road more to prepare for this event.

Any Other Stuff:
Reserve your hotel room early if you decide to do this event next year!

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Catalina Island Marathon - Catalina Island, Ca. - March 15th, 2003

Margie Stauffer reports:
Distance: marathon
Goal: 6:15 hrs.
Results: DNF — 20+ miles

General Summary:
WEATHER is the key word here.
There was 4” of rain in the five hours I was on the course. Winds were 35/40 mph. The dirt roads/trails were 6/8” of swishy, sloggy mud that took you up and down close to 5,000’ of elevation gain. Throughout this torrential downpour, lowering temps. and constant wind, I actually had a ‘blast’. What a ‘fun’ major challenge. Emergency ponchos over running shorts (and my coveted IC shirt), was the uniform of the day.
(Ha-like the poncho kept you warm dry :-).) The hail was a most unusual occurrence on the island.

Things Done Right:
Trained with the Incline Club ~ grrrrrr!!!! Great training. Our snowy, icy trails and altitude helped prepare me for the challenge, at least early on. Passed dozens of people in the first 14 miles. I was ahead of pace at the half way point. I really felt terrific and strong. (The nose-dive came later.)

I made each Sunday’s IC run. Approached the run with a good attitude and determination. Never questioned finishing. (Silly me.)

Things Done Wrong:
Started going hypothermic around 14-15 miles. I was able to hang on until around 20 miles at which time they wrapped me in sleeping bags and the run was ‘history’. I’m still not sure how I could have avoided the outcome. Guess it will haunt me for a long time. Never would have thought I would DNF in a marathon but.............:-(

Any Other Stuff:
Of course ~ wonderful runners on the course and terrific volunteers out in that horrendous weather all day. I actually had new runner ‘best friends’ who offered me their ‘finish’ shirt. Incredible!!!!!

I would highly recommend this ‘off road’ marathon as a ‘must do sometime’ run.

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Winter Triathlon Series Championship - Snow Mountain Ranch, CO - March 9, 2003

Michael Hagen reports:2003
Distance: 8k run/15k MTB/10k XC Ski
Goal: Find out what a Winter Tri is like.
Results: I did! (16th place, 1:59:00)
Website: http://www.mountain-quest.com/

General Summary:
The third in a series of Winter Triathlons at Snow Mountain Ranch. I skipped the first two figuring, “Hey who needs practice.” The 8k run was to have been on snow packed roads, but most of the snow had melted, so it was on mud roads instead. The 15k mountain bike was on XC ski trails where the snow was so deep and soft that it was more like a 10k MTB/5k MTB push. The 10k XC skate-ski was pretty challenging, both in terrain and snow conditions, especially for a 3rd timer!

Things Done Right:
I’m still thinking about that. But it was kind of fun, in a “Man, this sucks!” kind of way.

Things Done Wrong:
Since I had only skate-style XC skied once before, I naturally spent Saturday practicing, trashing myself in the process. So I was already tired and sore before the race began. Then discovered that mountain biking in deep snow is much more difficult than the 2-3 inches I am used to on the trails to work here. (Tip — deflate your tires a lot!) Oh, and my transitions left a LOT to be desired. But I didn’t fall on the ski!!

Any Other Stuff:
It was great fun. XC skiing is an incredible workout. Plenty of raffle give aways afterwards. A beautiful spot to spend a weekend (which I should have done a few times before the race, to practice XC skiing on all their great trails.)

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Los Angeles Marathon - Los Angeles, CA - March 2, 2003

Connilee Walter reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles of hot pavement
Goal: Ummm… run a marathon?!
Results: Ran it! Finished in 3:18 and change.
Website: http://www.lamarathon.com

General Summary:
Why L.A.?? AnneMarie needed to run a spring qualifier for the Comrades Marathon. I hadn’t run a flat marathon in almost two years and figured, what the heck, I’d give it a shot. Also a fun way to celebrate my new age group.

Things Done Right:
Trained moderately and didn’t get injured pre-race. Ran a January 5k and February 5m to get the legs moving. Alternated long mountain runs to build strength and long flat runs to mimic the race course. Hydrated well.

Things Done Wrong:
Not prepared for the relative heat of L.A. Would be interested to hear how other Coloradans prepare for such a race but if I were to do it again I would try more treadmill (indoor) runs and noontime runs (if the weather were warm enough here). In hindsight, considering the heat, I went out too hard.

Any Other Stuff:
The LA Marathon course was changed two years ago and is now touted as ‘even flatter and faster’. The first few miles are definitely a gradual down hill but at mile 14 and then again between miles 16-20 there were a few hills that were Ruxton-esque (just as steep but not as long) that were unanticipated. Crowd support was fantastic at start and finish and adequate through the rest of the course. Water and gels were plentiful. Race organization at starting line was poor.

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Spring Runoff - Pueblo, CO - March 2, 2003

Derek Griffiths reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: Marathon Pace (6:00/mile)
Results: 5th OA in 61:04

General Summary:
Flat course with some snow on the Bike Path section which slowed times a bit. Not enough volunteers, as I missed 3 turns, adding about 1/2 mile to my race. It didn’t matter, as I would have finished 4th instead of fifth. My time would have been just under 6:00’s though, and that was my goal.

Things Done Right:
Picked it up the last 3 miles to 5:45’s

Things Done Wrong:
Went out too hard (5:35) for a race that I wanted to run marathon pace at. Missed 3 turns, adding about 1/2 mile to my race.

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Franklin Mountains Trail Race - El Paso, TX - Sat, Feb 22, 2003

Bill Ransom reports:
Distance: 40 mi
Goal: finish
Results: finished 7th with time of 8:49

General Summary:
The race was held in El Paso’s Franklin Mountain State Park. This is the largest urban park in the country with about 28,000 acres.

Thirty-two folks started the race which had three loops. Ten of us completed the full 40 mile distance. Ultra runner legend Eric Clifton finished 1st with time of 5:39 and Val Caldwell finishing 2nd at 6:39.

Things Done Right:
I’ve been doing plenty of 20-30 mile runs over the past three months.

Things Done Wrong:
Pretty nasty sunburn. Also, every plant in the park was covered with very sharp spines. Those evil plants liked to grab me as I went by.

Any Other Stuff:
This race had a lot of rolling hills with one tough hill towards the end of the loop, but nothing that an Incliner couldn’t easily handle. The race would have been more fun if the hills were tougher. The race director is thinking about making it a 50 miler next year.


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Mardi Gras Marathon - New Orleans - 2/16/03

Alex Eusebio reports:
Distance: marathon (26.2 miles)
Goal: 3 hrs
Results: 2.58.41
Website: http://www.mardigrasmarathon.com

General Summary:
went out pretty slow, but made up for it in the second half. I guess all that altitude training does pay off after all. hmmm... let’s see ... I almost got run over by an elder lady (mile 18) that couldn’t see there was a race in progress (even with the road blocks). One of the highlights must have been a man dressed in a dress chasing me down to hand me some water. All-in-all, not a bad a race. Of course, we ended up partying for 4 days straight afterwards.

Things Done Right:
paced was pretty solid.

Things Done Wrong:
went out too slow. It took me a while to find my pace.

Any Other Stuff:

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Michael Robbert reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: 3:10
Results: 3:15
Website: http://www.mardigrasmarathon.com

General Summary:
Nice day for running, probably mid-40’s with a light mist about half way through.

Things Done Right:
1. Held back for the first few miles so I didn’t die early.
2. Tapered well, but not too much
3. Took fluid at every aid station (and finally learned to use the cups on the run.)

Things Done Wrong:
1. Didn’t get in long enough runs. I topped at 2:30 and think that I should have done at least a couple of runs closer to 3 hours.
2. Didn’t coordinate my gels with water stops so I don’t think I got all the nutrients that I could have.

Any Other Stuff:
Course was flat and fast just like advertised. There was one bridge that we crossed twice, but due to all my hill workouts it was a welcome change from the boring horizontal. The half marathon was run with the marathon which helped me find a good pace group, but then after the half I was stuck on my own for awhile. There were some boring stretches in the second half.

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Frosty Trail Challenge - Chatfield Res. - 2/9/03

Sue Lloyd reports:
Distance: 12.5 K
Goal: Run at about 75% effort and have fun
Results: 4th in age group
Website: http://coachweber.com

General Summary:
One of the great things about this race is that dogs are allowed to run in it. My running partner, Shasta and I had a fun run!

Things Done Right:
Wore the right clothes for the temperature and wind, ate well the night before, drank enough during the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Nothing!

Any Other Stuff:
Coach Weber puts on some fun trail runs throughout the year. Check his website.

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Rocky Raccoon 50 Mile Trail Run - Huntsville State Park, Texas - February 1, 2003

Teresa Taylor reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Goal:10 hours, top 5 women
Results: 9 hr 20 min, 2nd woman, 7th overall

General Summary:
Four 12.5 mile loops, mostly wooded trail, some jeep road. Lots of roots!!!!

Things Done Right:
Good body management = balanced input and output! Was able to keep pushing myself, walking only about 1/4 mile of entire course. Stayed mentally strong. Challenged for 1st on last loop, but could not hold it.

Things Done Wrong:
Initially I thought I ran the first loop too fast. In retrospect, it kept me in touch with the 1st place woman and all runners ran the first loop a little quicker than the others. A little more training and maybe I could have held on to first place to the finish line! In all, I was pleased with my race, especially with being able to run as much of it as I did. Running the mountains you have more opportunity to change or break up the pace. This course was ALL runnable without any major hills or bad footing to change pace.

Any Other Stuff:
On a sad note, in our second hour of the race we heard some strange loud noises that we later realized to be from the shuttle. We were about 40 miles from the debris field.

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Rocky Raccoon 100 Mile Trail Run - Huntsville State Park, Texas - February 1, 2003

Neal Taylor reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Results: 23 hr 58 min, 33rd overall

General Summary:
Five 20 mile loops, mostly wooded trail, some jeep road. Lots of roots!!!!

Things Done Right:
Nothing comes to mind!!!

Things Done Wrong:
I have a big ol' list...but most of it revolves around my intense training regimen-not!

Any Other Stuff:
At 20 miles in to the race, at one of the aid stations, an official said "The space shuttle exploded upon re-entry." I ran the rest of the day and night with no more news than that. It gave me something to think about...but that was weird.

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Death Valley Marathon - Titus Canyon, Death Valley, CA - February 1, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish injury free
Results: finished injury free
Website: http://www.envirosports.com

General Summary:
This was another race held in Death Valley which I did as a training run for Badwater. Speed and time wasn’t an issue this time. I just wanted to get some good miles in without aggravating any old injuries. Titus Canyon was spectacular, the scenery changed around every curve. Lots of Badwater veterans there as well, which made for lots of interesting conversation along the way. The mood of the race was rather somber, as the space shuttle exploded earlier that morning. It was kind of strange hearing about it in a place called Death Valley.

Things Done Right:
Envirosports does pick some cool places to run, however, they don’t give you a lot as far as well stocked aid stations, and their goody bag is merely a goody envelope. Fortunately I brought two water bottles, and my own food, because they ran out at 15 miles. It was unusually hot this year, mid-80’s, and by the time my Badwater friends and I rolled into the aid station there wasn’t much left. Death Valley is a bad place to run out of water, no matter what time of the year it is.
As far as other stuff done right, I maintained a slow but consistent pace, and didn’t aggravate old injuries, and was able to bike to my motel from the finish, and run 12 miles the next day.

Things Done Wrong:
I could have done this course a lot faster.

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San Diego Marathon - Carlsbad, CA - January 19, 2003

Terry Buehl reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 3:15:00
Results: 3:28:37

General Summary:
The race started out in a thick pea-soup fog which gradually burned off. The support along the way was excellent, water and Ultima at every mile with Cliff Gells being handed out at a least six different locations. Bands were playing at several locations. Also, the Expo was quite good for a medium sized race.

Things Done Right:
- Well, at least my shoes didn’t come undone!
- Signed up to run with the 3:15 pace group.
- I also ran a marathon PR, although not quite the time that I had hoped for.
- Considering I was slightly injured going into the race, I guess I demonstrated a high pain tolerance.

Things Done Wrong:
- Was injured going into the race!
- Decided I could go way faster than the 3:15 pace group! (And I did — that is until mile 19)
- Decision to eat oatmeal for breakfast before the race was definitely a bad idea!

Any Other Stuff:
They could sure use a few more Porta-Johns along the route! The first one I hit was pad-locked shut!

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Trek to 10 mile - Breckenridge - January 19, 2003

Jonathan Veteto reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: smile lots, finish strong in an hour
Results: finished smiling in 1:01 (kinda slow)
Website: http://www.greatadventuresports.com

General Summary:
2nd year of doing the trek to 10mile station. This year, the route was quite a bit longer (people complained last year) and ran backwards from the previous course. It started at the bottom of peak 9 by the Maggie, went up by the burro trail, and then cut off into singletrack. Two loops around in the woods, then back to a ski run for a tough uphill finish. The course was a mix of packed snow and powder.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t start too hard. As this was only my second snowshoe race, tried to start smart and kind of run it as a tempo run. Only fell down 3 or 4 times this year :) yeah ! Finished the uphill really, really good. Passed a few on the last hill (Thanks, Matt !). All in all, a great way to spend the morning. Learned from the past, wore less clothes than I thought I needed, and got some little gaitors to keep the snow out of my shoes.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t run hard enough. I thought I finished 5 minutes faster than I did (who among us doesn’t ? :). Since I was able to keep up a conversation with the guy in front of me the whole two laps, I probably should have kept my mouth shut and run faster. Oh well. Running well in snowshoes requires practice it would seem, especially going downhill with any type of speed. I need practice !

Any Other Stuff:
It was warm, sunny, and the snow was soft. Met some really nice people (Mo, Hal, Dave, a girl named ‘Rocket’, and two other girls desperately seeking the old bloody mary). What else could you ask for in a Colorado morning ? AND, everyone got a nalgene bottle with a cool yellow lid. Might be one of the coolest race thingys ever, except for the ski hat I got once (same company, different race).

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Mt Greylock Snowshoe Race - Adams, MA - January 18, 2003

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 3.5 miles
Goal: Win women’s race & break course record
Results: 1st o/a female, broke course record by 11 seconds
Website: http://www.runwmac.com

General Summary:
It was an extremely cold morning (and day!). We have been so spoiled by 40-50 degree days in Colorado, that running in o degree weather was a shock to the system! It didn’t take that long to warm-up though!

Things Done Right:
Dressed appropriately. Drank lots of coffee!

Things Done Wrong:
Could have gotten more sleep. I really wasn’t in race mode that morning, but managed to get some focus before the start because I wanted to win and break the course record.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was fast, with good snow. There was just enough singletrack, places to pass, and small climbs. After the race, there was plenty of food and some fires to warm things up. The snow was shining, so people were hanging out afterwards.

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Avalon 50 miler - Catalina Island, CA - January 11, 2003

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 50 miles
Results: 11:02:00

General Summary:
I ran this unique island race as my first training run for the 2003 Badwater race in July, which I will hopefully get into again this year. I heard it had lots of climbing and descents. It did. It was alot harder than I thought it would be. Catalina Island is about 25 miles off the coast of Long Beach California.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t get sea-sick going out. Did not pet the wild buffalo that roamed freely on the island, although one idiot did and was charged. Perhaps this would have helped me run faster, maybe not. I did not pet the baby rattle snakes either, which apparently some people thought was a good idea. Hydrated with Pedialyte and fueled well,and finished strong.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t go out hard enough. I could have done this course around 10 hours. I ran the last half nearly 90 minutes faster than the first half. I have to try and remember not to run my Badwater pace at other races.

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Swift Skedaddle — snowshoe - Silverthorne - January 5, 2003

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 10K??????
Goal: Do it
Results: It should be illegal to have this much fun!!

General Summary:
If you have not done a snowshoe race I highly recommend you give one a try. If you are going to do one you might consider one of the Swift Skedaddle races (next one March 8th in Frisco).

Snowshoe races are a great way to work hard at altitude. Most courses have plenty of hills to abuse yourself on. No two snowshoe races are alike. Swift Skedaddle races favor single track with lots of up’s and down’s. Oxygen debt becomes a constant companion.. Did I say it was fun!! There was 10K and 3K course, however I do not believe for a minute that they really have any clue if courses were close to advertised distance. I believe the winning time for the 10K was around 1:01. I do know that Danelle must have a sick mind to think up the routes encountered in Swift Skedaddle races. The version I did yesterday included having to crawl through a culvert. Did I say it was fun!! Lots of fun!!

Besides a great course, the race offered great post race food, lots of stuff for prize drawings, coffee mugs for age group winners, and T-shirts for all entrants. There was also a kids race (deep snow dash). Demo snowshoes were available. Race day cost was $22.

Things Done Right:
Step 1: Got up early and drove to race.

Worked hard and had a lot of fun. Did not overdress — it is tempting to think being out in deep snow you have to bundle up.

Focused on technique: you loss a little time and a lot of energy with falls and faulty steps, for the most part I avoided them.

Got 1:24 of quality training, converts to something much tougher than 10K, maybe equal to hard French Creek (yea I know Matt — NoName) round trip effort.

Got coffee mug :-)

Things Done Wrong:
Long run Friday (18 miles) still lingered in legs, but since snow shoe race was just intended to be hard workout probably did not matter that I did not feel fresh.

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Christianson Trail Race - North Mountain Preserve, Phoenix, AZ - Jan.4,2003

Lindsay Cavner reports:
Distance: 13.5 miles
Goal: to cross the finish before the 65 year old woman (I am competitive)
Results: Strong finish...time means nothing to me

General Summary:
The race was an out and back course mixed with flats and hills...lots of tough gravel and larger ankle twisting rocks. Not too many women racers...believe I was 1 of around 10.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated well pre and during race. Took GU at the right times which kept me going.

Things Done Wrong:
I held back too much in the beginning and got stuck behind some really slowbe runners on tough to pass single track...had to expend too much energy to pass them. Further, too much holiday feasting with little long distance runs to prepare further impacted my endurance for this race...but hey, at least I was out there. I also walked some of the steeper hills....Shame on me, I wasn’t even at altitude.....

Any Other Stuff:
Rocky rough terrain with solid packed surface definitely difficult on my ankles, knees and legs in general (Not used to phoenix rocky trail impact as compared to Colorado’s soft trail impact) Need I mention that I miss Colorado running, among other things, tremendously! Hoping to be back in under 2 years...keep the trails warm for us.

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Romero Crossing - Tucson, Arizona - 1/01/2003

Gordon Neal reports:
Distance: 29 miles
Goal: recover from New Year’s Eve
Results: DNF

General Summary:
I used to live in Tucson and went down for a visit. I
only discovered that they had a race on New Year’s Day
the day before the race and I ran it just to run with
some old running friends.The Tucson race series is very
low keyed as they have had problems with the park
service before (Many of their races are held in
Sahauro National Park). This race is a point to point
that crosses the Catalina Mountain Range.

Things Done Right:
Get Up that early on New Year’s Day. The race started
at 7AM.

Things Done Wrong:
Not Planned to race. If I go back in the future, I
now know that there is a race held every year on New
Year’s.

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YMCA Christmas Run - Boise, ID - December 21, 2002

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: 35 minute tempo run
Results: 35:01
Website: http://www.spondoro.com/results/ymcaxmas/2002/reportsFinishOverallFrameset.asp

General Summary:
I wanted a little tune up before a trail half marathon that I’m training for in Arizona. I felt ok although I definitely could tell that I had not tapered for this one. I could tell this especially when two people passed me on the “big hill.” This hill was about as steep as the road from Manitou to the Cave of the Winds. The 1/2 mile of downhill was steep and muddy. I couldn’t go very fast on this due to not tapering as well.

Things Done Right:
Remembered that this was a tempo run for me and didn’t kick it in at the finish line despite being passed at the end. Although this resulted in my first non top ten finish in a race for several years.

Things Done Wrong:
Moved to Arizona and my training has suffered!

Any Other Stuff:
The event was well run except that it started about 5 minutes late. Nice post race dinner and awards ceremony.

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Rock Canyon 1/2 marathon - Pueblo - December 8, 2002

Larry Miller reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: Focus on heart rate
Results: Outstanding
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/scrrs2C1.htm

General Summary:
This was my first race to run in four months. The weather just right - 36, sunny. The course flat, I mean flat.
Over the years the course has changed. The last couple of races went east into town and back. It was all asphalt and concrete. Well this year they were heading west back to the dam on dirt roads and rocky trails. No hills to speak of, flat and more flat. The only thing flatter is a treadmill.
My main goal for this race was to focus on using my heart rate monitor, in the following manner; keep it at 80-85% mhr, or death zone for the first 4-5 miles then 85-90 for the next 5 miles and then 90-95 for 2 miles and the last mile see what happens, 95+ to the finish.
Well most everybody knows I like to take off fast so I had a challenge ahead of me to concentrate on my HR goals.
The race started at 9 am and off they went faster then ever. Not me, I was at 80% for the first 1.1 miles then my heart rate dropped to 65%. Then off I went again - 83% mile 2, 83% to mile 5 then up to 85%. By mile 6 I was at 89%. Mile 7 was coming, and ahead a group of four runners. I went up to 93% and went by them They sounded like they just sprinted a quarter mile while I was breathing easy and legs felt great as I went by the dam. I said a couple of dam words but kept going at 93%. At 10 miles I saw 3 runners ahead about a quarter mile so I picked it up to 93-94% and I quickly noticed I was pulling up on these guys. I went to 95% of max and all of a sudden there was Santa Claus, no, I just started passing them one at a time. At 12 I caught another but didn’t know whom he was (found out later it was Barry Roth) but I didn't care because I was totally focused on what I was doing. I went up the only hill at 97% and hit the top at 98% (I think this hill was taken off the Incline). I rounded a corner and there was a person just ahead, then it happened. My heart blew up, if only you were so lucky, and finally there it was. The finish line, at 98% of my max. I felt great, but tried. I had run the second half of the races 3 minutes faster the first 6 miles. The only way to fly.
As I was cooling down I heard that a Springs runner had taken a bad fall at nine mile but was still running the race. Well the injured runner was Martha Kinsinger, 68. She got a black eye (below her eye and above), fat lip and broken teeth, and cut hand. However she still finished!

Any Other Stuff:
For the first two Sunday IC runs I had worn my heart rate monitor and ran Longs Ranch Road to get my HR up and hold it up and to breathe heard, over a long point of time. It paid off.

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David Swiderski reports:
Distance: 13.1 M
Goal:
Results: 1:24:15
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/scrrs2C1.htm

General Summary:
The main purpose in running this race was to see what shape I’m in. Well, you can call me Dracula, because I sucked! I missed my personal record by a whopping 13 minutes! I guess I should train more than twice a week.

Things Done Right:
Absolutely nothing.

Things Done Wrong:
Got old, fat and slow.

Any Other Stuff:
The Rock Canyon Half Marathon is a flat course along the Arkansas River going from Pueblo City Park to Pueblo Reservoir and back. The course is about 1/2 dirt, 1/2 asphalt, and 1/2 concrete. My car was parked near the one mile mark. I probably should have stopped there and gone home.

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High Desert 50k and 30k Trail Run - Ridgecrest, CA - December 8, 2002

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 30k
Goal: under 4 hours
Results: 3:43:00 approx
Website: http://othtc.com

General Summary:
I was going to run the 50k, but aggravated my IT Band at the previous days marathon, so I changed it to the 30k. This was a good idea. The race was well organized, and low key. There were alot of really fast runners there. Good running surface too, and only a few hundred feet of pavement. There was alot more climb than I had expected, but since I don’t like to run down hill, I didn’t mind.

Things Done Right:
Despite the mornings rough start, I still dragged myself to the start. I took in alot more salt than yesterday, which helped keep nausea at bay, and took a vitamin during the race. I also didn’t over fuel, since it was a short distance, which also helped my stomach.

Things Done Wrong:
I think I could have pushed myself a bit harder, but was afraid to aggravate my IT Band again.

Any Other Stuff:


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Death Valley Borax Marathon - Death Valley, CA - December 7, 2002

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: finish under 5 hours
Results: finished under 5 hours
Website: http://envirosports.com

General Summary:
The Borax Marathon started at Furnace Creek Resort, about 17 miles from the Badwater start. It is only 190 feet below sea level, as compared to 282 feet below sea level at Badwater. It was an out and back course, relatively flat.

Things Done Right:
Was well rested and hydrated. Maintained a consistent pace throughout the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Went too slow.

Any Other Stuff:
The “white line” sure was familiar. Death Valley is interesting because when you go back in the opposite direction you came, it looks like an entirely different place. The temperature was less than half when I ran Badwater.

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Pedal Power 4-mile snowshoe - Vail, CO - December 7, 2002

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: approx 4 miles
Goal: top-5 o/a woman
Results: 4th o/a woman

General Summary:
The course at this race is cool...technical, lots of ups and downs and off-camber sections. Little to zero flat sections or groomed trails. More strength than running on this course.

Things Done Right:
Ate the right amount before the race. Warmed up properly. Didn’t start out too fast or get too erratic in the off-camber, technical sections.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t push a little harder to pass the third place woman. I could tell she was getting tired, but I just kept my pace steady. The fifth place woman was right behind me, so I was determined to not let her pass me!

Any Other Stuff:
The entry fee was only $15 pre-reg. The course was excellent and well-marked. After the race, there was spaghetti, salad, brownies, and coffee for the racers and their families. I also won $15 cash for 4th (hey, it paid for my entry fee!) and a pair of sunglasses in the drawings. Well worth the trip to Vail!

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7th Special Forces Group Jingle Bell Jog - Fort Bragg, NC - December 6, 2002

Michael Hagen reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: Meet some old friends, get an “R"
Results: 34:22, 1st place

General Summary:
A 10k road race open to anyone, but at 9:30 a.m. on a Friday, so virtually all participants were family members or military personnel who wanted to get out of work for the morning!!

Followed the Wednesday night/Thursday morning ice storm on East Coast, so a good tour of a lot of downed trees. Race start was delayed 15 minutes due to a fallen power line across the course just a few minutes before the start.

Things Done Right:
Relaxed, paced fairly well, enjoyed the scenery, said thanks to the volunteers, enjoyed the thick air!

Things Done Wrong:
Well, I supposed it’s not normally a good idea to do a track speed workout (first in 6 months) at 7:30 before a 9:30 race, but I learned about the race reading a poster on the way back from the track!
Forgot my trophy in my room at the “Airborne Inn.”

Any Other Stuff:
A new course. Much more scenic and a bit more challenging (rolling hills) than the one I ran 94-97.
A great raffle afterwards (3 21” TVs, etc.)
Outstanding security!!

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Run to the Far Side XVIII - Golden Gate Park San Francisco, CA - December 1, 2002

Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: PR
Results: 44:49 Pace: 7:12
Website: http://www.sfgate.com/runtothefarside/

General Summary:
I ran this 10K race last year as well, and as Carole is still working out in Santa Rosa, I flew out again to spend Thanksgiving week with her... and run to the Far Side.

Humidity: 93%
Temperature: 50s at the start, 60s at the finish.
Slight early morning fog/haze burning off to clear blue skies.
Altitude: Between 6,000 and 9,000 feet lower than the Sunday Incline Club LRR workout.

Things Done Right:
Relaxed and enjoyed it. Steady pace throughout. Ran the week previously with my wife Carole, who starting running in October with friends most mornings. Spent the two previous days wine ‘tasting’ in Sonoma and Napa valleys.

Things Done Wrong:
Wasn’t at the 5K finish to watch Carole (best support crew ever) cross the finish line in her first race. Hadn’t done ANY speed work prior to this race. After my first mile split (7:10) I knew this wouldn’t be a PR day. (2 minutes off last year’s time, but finished better position within my age group... the old guys are slowing down). Spent the two previous days wine ‘tasting’ in Sonoma and Napa valleys.

Any Other Stuff:
The course runs straight out of Golden Gate onto a neighboring city avenue on a slight downhill, at 1.5 miles the course changed directions, turning up one street then back into the park on a parallel avenue now a slight uphill. Coming back into the park the 5K runners split off left, and the 10K turned right up into the hills of Golden Gate Park. The last 3+ miles take you through the park, with some rolling hills on asphalt trails and roads. Race organizers did improve the split timing and mile markers over last year, with times being read at every visible mile marker. The 10K course has one water station. Because of congestion, runners are “steered” into two chutes at the finish.


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North Central Trail Marathon - Sparks, Maryland - November 30, 2003

Doug Laufer reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: get state #32 — enjoy the process
Results: 3:20:58

General Summary:
Two miles on roads (slight downhill) to trailhead. Out and back on trail, slight grade, down back. Wonderful setting and surface. Aid stations adequate — water and Gatorade. Mile markers. Small low keyed race, also a relay. Not much food after race, Pre and post race administration was not well planned. Long sleeve t-shirt (nice) and finisher medals. Ran relaxed and easy from start — surprised at splits. Mile 3 time of 8:04 was slow mile for the day. Slight incline going out was not really aware of it. Never really hit the wall, attribute that to mild conditions, forgiving surface, and slight decline, very slight. Guess smart pacing helped too :-) 1:43:25/1:37:33 = 3:20:58 (negative splits big time).

Things Done Right:
Did not eat too much for Thanksgiving, good mileage base for goal — several long runs. Good taper, went to line healthy, rested. Ran very smart race — negative splits. YOGA — have been taking yoga class this semester — injuries that have nagged me for years have not been a problem.

Things Done Wrong:
Very little wrong for this specific race. To improve marathon times need to do speed work and PMP work. Just need to spend more time running and less on other life stuff to improve.

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Gobbler Grind Marathon - Overland Park, Kansas - November 24, 2003

Tony Krupicka reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: sub-3:00
Results: 2:55:11

General Summary:
I ended up having a pretty good race. The weather was pretty good: 37 degrees and overcast, but it was a little windy. The course was two loops on pancake flat asphalt bike trails through a big park. I think there were only about 200 runners in the field, and I went into the race with no other goal than to break 3 hours. I started out at what felt like a conservative race, but when I hit the first mile mark in 6:53 I found that I was already right on pace for my goal. The flat course and abundance of air made the pace for the first 10 miles or so seem ridiculously easy. I hit 10 miles in 68:59, but my last mile had been a 7:00, so I felt like I needed to pick it up. I sure did pick up the next mile with a 6:32! That was the beginning of a mid-race surge that culminated in me passing the 2nd and 1st place men between the 17 and 19 mile marks with mile splits of 6:19, 6:12, and 6:13. I maintained 6:20-30 pace through 22 miles where my hamstrings started feeling like steel cables and my pace slowed to 6:45ish per mile. I just ended up running into the finish like that for the win. This race is small but very well-organized. The post race food is bountiful and I received a Montrail running shirt, a Reebok fanny-pack and a free picture frame with a race photo in it for winning the race. The entry fee was pretty steep ($40), but since I won the race, I felt like I got my money’s worth. The race shirt was also pretty nice: a long-sleeved mock turtleneck. Overall, a successful day. I guess I actually consider this my marathon debut even though I ran a 3:50 at Lake Okoboji seven years ago when I was 12 years old. A well-organized, fast event.

Things Done Right:
Tapered pretty well. Ran high mileage for the three weeks before that (100+). Ran high mileage all summer (1332 miles for the summer) and most of the fall during cross country season. Did lots of marathon-pace runs of 12-20 miles during the month leading up to the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I don’t know if this affected my last 4 miles slow-down, but I hardly drank during this race. The weather was cold, I didn’t want to break stride, and it seemed like whenever I took a drink I got very out of breath and off-stride. If the weather hadn’t been so chilly, I would’ve died, but it ended up working out all right. I didn’t practice drinking in training at all. If I had been really serious about running a fast time I would’ve not run XC and trained more specifically for this race, but that is simply not the case because I love XC.

Any Other Stuff:
I think I already covered everything.

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