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2002 Incline Club Race Reports

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View 2003 race reports

Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon, Aug 17-18, 2002 - 51 reports
Leadville Trail 100 - Leadville, Colorado - August 17-18, 2002 7 reports
Sierre-Zinal - Sierre-Zinal, Switzerland - 08/11/02
Bouilder Peak Triathlon - Boulder, CO - Sunday, Aug 11 2 reports
Alyeska International Mountain Race - Girdwood, Alaska - August 10
Canmore Challenge - Canmore, Alberta, Canada - August 3
Badwater - Death Valley California - July 23, 24, & 25
Vail Hill Climb - Vail - July 7, 2002 3 reports
Summer Roundup 12K - Colorado Springs, CO - July 7, 2002 20 reports
Palmer Lake 4mi - Palmer Lake - July 4, 2002
Schoolcraft Firecracker 5-mile - Schoolcraft, MI - July 4, 2002
5K Race for Otter House (child care) - Castine, Maine - 4th July, 2002
Sharon 5 Mile Road Race - Sharon, Massachusetts - June 30, 2002
Tour du Lac (Tour of the Lake) - Bucksport - Sat. June 29th, 2002
10K @ 10,000 feet - Vail, CO - June 23rd 2 reports
Run for Childs sake 5k/10k - Denver - June 16, 2002
Cheddar Challenge Trail Run - Alpine Valley Resort, East Troy, WI - 06/16/02
Mt Washington Road Race - Pinkham Notch, NH - 06/15/02
Apple Duathlon - Sartell, Minnesota - June 15
Arizona Road Racers Summer Series #2 - Phoenix, AZ - June 15, 2002 2 reports
Garden of the Gods 10 Mile - Garden of the Gods - June 9, 2002 33 reports
2002 Mile High 12-Hour - Chatfield State Park- Littleton, CO - June 8-9 2 reports
Mt. Diablo Summer Trail Run - Mt. Diablo State Park, Clayton, CA - June 8, 2002
Steamboat 1/2 Marathon - Steamboat Springs, CO - June 2, 2002
Squaw Peak 50 - Provo, Utah - 6/1/02 - 2 reports
Fort Collins Old Town Half-Marathon - Fort Collins, Colorado - Sunday, May 19, 2002
Leeds Marathon - Leeds, England - May 12, 2002
City of Pittsburgh Marathon - Pittsburgh, PA - May 5, 2002
Law Day 15k - Santa Barbara, CA - May 4, 2002
Big Sur International Marathon - Carmel by the Sea, CA - April 28, 2002
Cafe to Cafe 100 - Arvada, CO - April 27-28, 2002 - 2 reports
106th Boston Marathon - Boston, MA - April 15, 2002 - 2 reports
Bataan Memorial Death March - White Sands, NM - April 14, 2002
Golden Gate Marathon - San Francisco, CA - April 6, 2002
Alferd Packer Trail Challenge - Littleton, CO - March 10, 2002 - 3 reports
Spring Runoff - Pueblo, CO - March 3, 2002
Old Pueblo 50 mile run - Tucson, Arizona - March 2, 2002
Mountain to Fountain - Fountain Hills, AZ - February 23, 2002
US National Snowshoe Championships - Traverse City, MI - February 16, 2002
Las Vegas Marathon - Las Vegas, NV - February 3, 2002
San Diego Marathon - Carlsbad, CA - January 20, 2002
Breckenridge Snowshoe 10K - Breckenridge, CO - January 20, 2002
World Golf Village Half Marathon - St. Augustine, FL - January 12, 2002
Tucson Marathon - Tucson, AZ - Sunday, December 9, 2001
Honolulu Marathon - Honolulu, HI - December 9, 2001 - 2 reports
Rock Canyon 1/2 Marathon - Pueblo, CO - December 2, 2001 - 8 reports
Seattle Marathon - Seattle, WA - November 25, 2001 - 2 reports
Run to the Farside - San Francisco, CA - November 25, 2001

View 2001 race reports


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Leadville Trail 100 - Leadville, Colorado - August 20, 2002

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: Finish before 30 hours
Results: 29:05:32
Webiste:http://www.leadvilletrail100.com

General Summary:
Over 400 runners, 189 finished. Weather: warm for the area, dry, calm mostly, stars were beautiful at night. Aid stations very well done. Volunteers were most helpful. Trail well marked, even at night (with glow sticks everywhere). Difficult terrain: Hope Pass south side, must be about 21% grade; Sugarloaf Pass at night, seemed very long. Most of the course is on trails, some jeep trails, some dirt roads, a little bit of paved road, and one stream of significance to cross near Twin Lakes. Starts at 4:00 a.m. on Saturday in the middle of August (usually the same weekend as PPA/M) and closes at 10:00 a.m. on Sunday. Entry fee was $195 (2002). There is a website:

There is also a training weekend the last days of June and first days of July (in 2002: 29-30JUN and 1JUL). Well worth the $125 (2002) fee to run the course and talk to other veterans of the race.

Things Done Right:
Ran with the Incline Club as much as possible.
Did a 50-miler (Collegiate Peaks) in May to baseline. Ran the training weekend to see the course.
Tapered severely the last two weeks before race (no more than 2 miles, mostly walked or took bike rides).
Trained with an experienced ultra runner.
Packed my drop bags with my expected times of arrival in mind to determine what to drop at each aid station.
Packed my drop bags with things I like to drink, eat, wear.
Put clean socks on at each aid station and used Bag Balm to lube each time (no blisters occurred).
Put oldest pair of shoes on before going through stream and took them off after coming back through the stream.
Used several pairs of shoes.
Wore Gore-Tex during the cold of the night, along with good gloves, and a balaclava (sp?).
Packed extra sets of batteries in all drop bags.
Wore a Timex speed+distance watch for pace determination.
Read everything I could put my hands on about the race.
Started very long base training early with the club.
Had pacers/crew at night.
Consumed about 5,000 calories of food and 3,000 calories of hydration fluid (only lost 3 pounds).

Things Done Wrong:
Should have used pacers/crew at all points allowed (I waited until 60.5 mile point, they let you have pacers at 50 mile point and crew at most locations).
Some more hydration would have helped some.
Did not have warm clothes for Hope Pass.
Did not listen to pacers (they were more coherent).
Did not have a crew for the whole race (would have helped a lot).

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Rick Crawford reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: to finish
Results: 39.5m

General Summary:
Good weather conditions early on but a little warm
mid day. A little tight in my gluts in the beginning
and thought it would work itself out. It continued to
spread to my hams and quads and reduced me to a walk
the last 12miles to Twin Lakes. I banked time to every aid station but Twin Lakes and missed it by 20min. As I continued my way to Twin Lakes couldn’t figure out what I did wrong until back at the condo it dawned on me I changed my mind about what shoes to start with .
Bad mistake. I know I can finish so I will return next year

Things Done Right:
Nutrition, hydration, Training with the INCLINE CLUB, tapering

Things Done Wrong:
Shoes

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Rick Hessek reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: 21:36:00
Results: 22:39:53 18th Overall

General Summary:
This was my 1st attempt at running a 100 mile race.
Knowing that Leadville 100 typically has a finisher
percentage of under 50%, I went into the race
respecting it.

Things Done Right:
Put the training in since the beginning of the year.

Things Done Wrong:
I feel not much went wrong that I could of prevented. Had some low spots occasionally throughout the race but I was able to recover. I would of like to finished in the time I set as my goal but I found out that a lot of problems can and do occur over the course of 100 miles. If you were to ask the 171 finishers behind me and the 276 that DNF’ed they would probably agree that my race went a little better then there’s did.

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Keith Grimes reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: Beat 22:08:xx and place in my age group.
Results: DNF — due to pacer Paul Sullivan

General Summary:
This was the first time in 5 Leadville starts that I could actually run the downhills without my quads locking up on me. However, somewhere along the way I must have forgot to drink enough fluid and paid for it at about mile 53 when my kidneys started shutting down. Up to this point I was feeling good and was well on my way to my best time ever. Coming out of the turn-around I found myself in 7th place, but not feeling quite right. A few miles later, I thought I pulled my back muscles and could not stand up straight without shooting pain in my lower back. I also became light headed. To make a long story short, the paramedics at the next aid station told me I had all the symptoms of my kidneys shutting down. I knew at this point my race was over, it was just a matter of walk/jogging to the finish or dropping...I felt bad for my pacers since they had come all the way up to the race to pace me. I finally dropped out late in the night around mile 85 while Paul Sullivan paced me. Paul had begged me to drop to take the heat off of him from his performance in last years PPM. If you are not familiar, Paul dropped out of the Pikes Peak Marathon at the midpoint of the race. He offered cash. He even offered me favors he had learned while he was in prison. I refused all, but decide to help him out anyway. You are welcome, PAUL SULLIVAN (2001 PPM quitter).

Things Done Right:
Physically and mentally ready this year.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not hydrate enough. I was 9 — 10 pounds down at mile 60. This was after sitting and drinking a lot of water. I may have been down as much as 12 pounds of fluid at the time my kidneys started to give me problems.

One other major thing done wrong: selection of pacer — Paul Sullivan (2001 PPM quitter!!). From now on, I will do a background check on all my pacers.
Calculator =

Any Other Stuff:
I just wanted to thanks Connilee for her kind words:
“Yeah, I think you should consider another sport since you wimped out on Leadville this year. Maybe ballet dancing or underwater basket weaving.”


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Rick Pearcy reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: Finish
Results: 29:50

General Summary:
I completed my first Leadville 100 with 10 minutes to spare. I just barely made the cutoff time at Winfield and then had to race cutoffs all the rest of the way back to Leadville. (In retrospect, that probably kept me motivated.) I was lucky that I had no health issues. I did not get sick, no cramps, no blisters, and no bad weather.

Things Done Right:
Ran with the Incline Club. The long weekend runs mixed with the Thursday strength runs worked out great. But I also ran on the Leadville course four or five weekends over the summer. Knowing the course helped a bunch.
I picked a great crew and pacer. My wife, Kim, and my great friend Todd Murray, crewed for me the first 50 miles. They always had what I needed when I needed it. Todd paced me the last 50 miles from Winfield all the way to the finish. Without his assistance, I would not have finished the race.
My crew and pacer used two-way radios. Great way to keep current with our current location and needs.
My nutritional and fluid schedule worked great. I never got dehydrated or hungry (or sick). I used fluids only (no solid foods)for the entire race. Drank Sustained Energy every 15 minutes.

Things Done Wrong:
Went out too conservatively (slow). A little more time in the bank would have allowed for a finish despite any “emergencies."
Should have enlisted more help for my crew/pacer. Being on a crew is a huge responsibility and a ton of work (and then endless waiting). More support for the crew could relieve the work load and allow them to sleep. *See details in “Any Other Stuff"
Any Other Stuff:
My wife, Kim, got up with me on Saturday morning at 3:00AM to help get ready for the race. She was at every aid station with all my equipment/fluids throughout the day and all through the night. Right at dawn, after meeting us at the last aid station (Mayqueen) before the finish line, she drove back toward Leadville. She fell asleep and drove off the mountain road, down an embankment, knocking down trees, bouncing off boulders, before coming to rest on the vehicle’s side. She kicked out a bigger hole in the windshield and crawled out of the Pathfinder. She climbed back up to the road, flagged down a vehicle, and went to the ER in Leadville. From a hospital exam table Kim called my pacer on the 2-way radio to say that she “had a little car trouble” and would meet us at the finish line. Kim escaped without serious injury (Thank God- burns on her face from the air bags, an injured wrist, and a couple nights of dreams about driving through the trees.) The vehicle did not fare so well.

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Carol Sauceda reports:
Distance: 100 miles
Goal: to finish in less than 30 hours (that’s the cutoff)
Results: Completed~30 miles. Missed the Halfmoon cutoff.

General Summary:
This was my 3rd consecutive pass at the LT100. I know that I can successfully complete this run, but I have yet to prove it.

Things Done Right:
Started training in October of 2001, with my training partner, Rick Crawford. Hooked up with the Incline Club runs as soon as they started for the new season. Put in back to back long tough runs, on Saturdays and Sundays — lots of mileage over the weekends. Did this every weekend, with good consistency. Ran with the IC’ers on Sunday, and often added distance/time to the prescribed course for that day, to achieve the targetd mileage.
Did lots of Mountain biking to build up strength in quads, and gluts. Ran very little during the week, so as to recover, and minimize the risk of injury.
Had a nice 3-week taper for LT100. This was time well spent, as my legs were trashed, and definitely needed the rest time. I also needed the downtime to recover from stress.
OTHER: Hydrated well, dressed warm for the start. Did stretches while waiting for the start of the race.
***Had an awesome training partner this year — Rick Crawford.

Things Done Wrong:
I feel like I did everything right, so it’s taken me some time to figure out what went wrong. Here it is. I was simply still to stressed — emotionally, physically, mentally, and spiritually. I did not have enough time to reduce my stress/tension levels down to a level that could allow for additional stress from the race to be absorbed and managed well. Basically, my body said that’s enough and just shut down. This condition resulted in a severe case of diarrhea, which started 30 minutes into the run, and continued for 6 hours. I do not believe there is anything I could have done to avoid this circumstance, other than take a full month off before Leadville, and simply REST.
The net result from losing lots of time for each necessary pit stop, was that I missed the cutoff at Halfmoon Outbound by 15 minutes. Cliff would not let me continue no matter what I said or how I cried. My 2002 LT100 race ended there in severe disappointment and many tears.

Any Other Stuff:
I must return. It is my passionate pursuit to finish Leadville. And I know now with even greater confidence, that I can cross that finish line in under 30 hours. LIVE, RUN, and LEARN !

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John Genet reports:
Distance: 100miles
Goal: 1) To finish 2) To finish in less than a day
Results: Finished — 25:05:55

General Summary:
Leadville is the most amazing race I have ever experienced. I haven’t added up all the hours that went into training and planning for this one race — probably not a great deal more than went into my first marathon. There is a major difference though — I never had any doubt I would finish that first marathon. With Leadville I had no idea. There are just too many things that can go wrong.

Now that I have finished my first 100 mile race, and now that the post-race soreness has subsided, I’m looking forward to the next one.

Things Done Right:
Trained well, tapered well and just generally felt great on race day. I also had a race plan with best, middle and worst case scenarios. For the first 85 miles of the race I was consistently, and comfortably, ahead of my middle (25 hour) scenario. I fell off that pace during the last 10-15 miles of the race. See things done wrong.

Things Done Wrong:
The further the race went along, the harder it was for me to take in sufficient fuel. I think this was the main reason for my slowing toward the end of the race. It may also be that I ran the first 50 miles a little fast but I’m pretty sure not eating enough was the greater problem. Preparation for the next race will include much more practice eating on the run.

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Sierre-Zinal - Sierre-Zinal, Switzerland - 08/11/02

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 30k...shortened on race day to 12k
Goal: top-20
Results: 10th
Website: http://www.fsa-sky.org

General Summary:
Wow. What a cool experience. This was the Skyrunning circuit race I chose to do (the overall female and male winners of the Barr Trail Mountain Race were awarded an expense-paid trip to another Skyrunning circuit race). Paul Low (the men’s winner) and I coordinated our travels and met at the Geneva airport on Friday. We took the train from Geneva to Sierre, then the race organizer picked us up and drove us to Zinal. We stopped for dinner, then settled into our flat. The next morning, it was cold and rainy. We ate breakfast with the other athletes at one of the village restaurants, then went shopping for warm clothing! Neither one of us expected the cold and rainy weather (bordering on snow). For lunch, all the invited athletes took the gondola to the top of a mountain and ate lunch and had the pre-race meeting. We took pictures of ourselves in the snow (with free-roaming cows in the background, of course). We spent the rest of the afternoon shopping and resting. We woke up the next morning for the race a nd met some British runners for a lift to the start...we were all turning green with all the narrow mountain switchbacks. Got to the race start...picked up our race numbers. It was cool because the invited athletes had last names (instead of numbers) on our bibs. Anyway, everybody crowded in at the start and took off. No personal space here folks! We were packed in like sardines until the gun went off!

Racing in Europe is definitely a trip! No porta-potties, no numbers on bags for the bag check (everybody just looks for their bag, it could be anywhere!). I want to go back!

Things Done Right:
Slept throughout flight to Switzerland, along with taking naps when I got there. Didn’t have jet lag, despite this being a whirlwind trip across numerous time zones. Didn’t run Friday (traveled all day) and ran real easy on Saturday.
Took advantage of the last part of the course, which turned into gradual climbing (not too steep)...Passed a handful of women on this section.

Things Done Wrong:
Had a little idea of what the course may be like, but didn’t expect how steep the first part of the course was...it turned into powerhiking on steep, slick and muddy climbs. I tried to keep running, but people were passing me while powerhiking, so I just followed suit. Mind you, the climbing on this course was steeper and longer than Longs Ranch Road...mainly on singletrack-type of trails with lots of people. Quite the challenge with it being muddy and slick, too.

Any Other Stuff:
The race was supposed to be a 30k (18 miles), but due to weather, it was cut back to 12k. The weather was cold, rainy, overcast and snowy the entire time I was in Switzerland. I chose this this race in the Skyrunning circuit because of the length and type of course (ascending and descending, instead of just steep ascending) because I’m stronger at these types of races. Well, turned out that this race was mainly steep climbing because of the shortening of the course. After about 8k, the course turns into gradual climbing and descending and that’s where I passed a number of women. I wasn’t sure where I placed in the race when I finished because the race start was so crazy (and I was ready to be done because I was so cold and wet). I rode the bus back to Zinal...and threw-up during the ride! Went back to our flat and got sick again. I got up in time to head to the awards ceremony with my roommate and USA runner, Paul Low. The awards tent was huge, with food cookin’, people smokin’ and th e oompa band in full swing. Of course, Paul and I looked like Americans, standing outside the tent because of the smoke. The race results were not posted anywhere, so I was surprised to hear I had placed 10th and won 90 Swiss francs. I got to walk up to the stage and give high-fives to all the kids on the steps. Paul placed 22nd and won money, too. The money was actually only slotted for top-five places with time primes, but because the course was shortened, the money was awarded deeper instead. After the awards tent, I went shopping for food (I could buy things now that I had money!) and then went to bed....and stayed there until I left Monday morning!
Basically, while everyone was out celebrating Sunday night, I was in bed sick. Quite the bummer, but it must’ve just been the ride on the narrow mountain roads. My eating was kinda screwed up, too so it was probably a combo of things.
Overall, it was quite the experience. I really enjoyed it and want to go back next year and run the entire course. The race organizers and Federation for Sport at Altitude were very accommodating and generous.

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Bouilder Peak Triathlon - Boulder, CO - Sunday, Aug 11

Robert Castaldi reports:
Distance: Olympic Dist 1.2K/42K/10K
Goal: not screw up my taper for the Ascent
Results: 2:28
Website: http://www.boulderpeak.com/

General Summary:
My mind was on the Ascent, so I only exerted 80% effort. I am a HUGE fan of cross training, no matter what your goals are. Boulder Peak is a highly competitive race, probably the toughest age group field for a Colorado based triathlon.

Things Done Right:
Rode bike using small gears, so I didn’t fry my legs (over 95 rpm). Focused on leg turnover, during the run. Kept HR 5 beats below AT the entire time.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
The event raises money for the MS Society. This year they raised $23,000.

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Sue Lloyd reports:
Distance: (duathlon) 5k, 42k, 10k
Goal: win my age group
Results: 2:57.20, won my age group!
Website: http://www.boulderpeak.com

General Summary:
Us duathletes are very disappointed that this was the last year for the duathlon...guess I’ll have to take up swimming. This race is so organized. Great aid stations, friendly volunteers, nice prizes and awards.

Things Done Right:
Went out easy on the first run. Stayed within heartrate goal knowing that I would pass lots of people on the ride, which I did. Put on a bigger freewheel for the climb up Old Stage Rd. Worked on spinning high rpm’s on the ride. Stayed hydrated...it was hot that day!

Things Done Wrong:
Ate poorly the night before at a friend’s party and had lots of (excuse me) gas during the runs. Alyeska International Mountain Race - Girdwood, Alaska - August 10

Alyeska International Mountain Race - Girdwood, Alaska - August 10
Nancy Hobbs reports:
Distance: 8K
Goal: finish in under 1 hour
Results: 54:16 — 3rd woman; 2nd master (within 30 seconds of 2nd place)
Website: http://alaskamountainrunners.org

General Summary:
Tough course with significant climbing for the first 2.5-3K from 150 feet to 2000 feet, then downhill for about 3.5K, then uphill for 1K, then downhill to finish. All on dirt single track and/or gravel/shale ski tracks.

Things Done Right:
Got up early to eat as the race started at noon. Still a bit depleted after the summit climb. Dressed perfectly for the weather — thank goodness I had gloves because I needed to use my hands to steady myself nearing the summit.

Things Done Wrong:
Used too much braking muscle on the descent and legs became noodle-like for part of the flat section and I couldn’t catch the woman just seconds in front of me. My legs just wouldn’t work right.

Any Other Stuff:
site of the 2003 World Mountain Running Trophy. Should be a great event. Poured for the entire run and was in the low 50s.

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Canmore Challenge - Canmore, Alberta, Canada - August 3

Nancy Hobbs reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: 1:00 or top 10 finish
Results: 1:06:23 — 11th woman; 1st master
Website: http://mountainrunning.com

General Summary:
Fabulous course. Two loops of 6K with just a short segment of pavement over a bridge near the start line. Race was staged at the site of the 1988 Winter Olympics. Nestled in the mountains.

Things Done Right:
Dressed for the conditions. Cool, a bit breezy in the 40s.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t eat anything before the race (10:45 start — up at 7:30 running around helping with the race and taking photos). I was feeling fatigued after 6K and totally depleted by the 9K point. Ran within myself and wasn’t sore afterwards, but need some work on the nutrition part.

Any Other Stuff:
site of one of two 2002 Canadian Team Selection races for the 2002 World Mountain Running Trophy. Great organization. Super place to visit. Back to the top


Badwater - Death Valley California - July 23, 24, & 25

Anita Bower reports:
Distance: 135 miles
Goal: finish under 60 hour cutoff time
Results: 54:51:25
Website: http://www.badwaterultra.com

General Summary:
Badwater 2002 was unlike any race I ever entered before. It started at Badwater, 282 feet below sea level and went up to over 8000 feet above sea level to the Whitney Portals. The logistical efforts were just as challenging as the race itself. There were also film crews from all over the world. Me and my crew had a film crew from Brazil film us at 37 miles in the scorching wind and blowing sand. The Discovery Travel Channel also tagged along for various segments of the race. My crew and I would run and stand up tall when they were there, and then go back to “wogging"( a cross between walking and jogging) when they left.

Things Done Right:
I finished. Also I drank and ate right. I used Penta water, which they claim is more easily absorbed through the cell walls, and mixed Pedialyte with my water for calories. I experienced no nausea or vomiting, and very little dehydration. I also ate soup, and small salty things, like crackers. Fat was kept to a minimum, since it is so hard to digest, and I didn’t want to waste energy digesting fats. When I did eat soup and crackers, I ate it sitting down while fixing blisters, which saved time and made it more easily digestable. Small sugary fruit chews also helped when I began to get depressed. I never cried or got teary eyed or lost my temper, except for one small hissy fit at 97 miles. Having a good crew was invaluable. They were awesome. Now two of them want to run it next year. I am running it next year too. Another thing I did right was start saving money late last year for the trip. Badwater isn’t cheap, but there are things that you can do to keep costs down. The last thing I did right was w earing an IC shirt across the finish. The Discovery Channel interviewed me right afterwards, so now the whole world will know about the Incline Club.

Things Done Wrong:
I’m looking at the background of this web page that says extreme pain is extremely good. Well, if you like extreme pain, you should do Badwater. Extreme pain that lasts an extremely long time. I have never blistered in any race before, but at Badwater I did. I was soon to be known as the Blister Bitch among my crew members. Every mile after running down Townes Pass I developed blisters. Big ones. I went to a blister seminar over the 4th of July. Thank God, because I quickly became an expert at fixing blisters. For over 25 miles, I continued to get blisters. Every two miles, I would get a new one, and have to stop and fix it. But the Navy decided to fly fighter jets over head for a five mile segment of where I was repairing my feet, so that was kind of surreal. I ended up cutting the toe boxes out of my running shoes, and even the toes out of my socks. Blisters are what kept me from getting a 48 hour buckle. My feet hurt so bad at the end of the race that I had to sit in a portable chair in the shower whi ch I so badly needed afterwards.

Any Other Stuff:
There were two times I wanted to quit. One time was when I was resting at the top of Townes Pass,(it’s an 18 mile uphill hike after going 42 miles through the hottest part of the course)and at 111 miles, around 3:30 a.m. the second night. Sleep deprivation started to kick in, and my crew chief wouln’t let me sleep. Finally I told him “how it was going to be and he no longer had any say in the matter.” I rested for 45 minutes, then bolted awake, and said, “Thats it, we’re going to the finish. Lets go!” There were lots of spiders and scorpions on the ground, and that helped keep me alert. Unfortunately there was a forest fire somewhere in California, and it all blew where we were running, and that made me tired. I ended up wearing goggles and a face mask to help keep the smoke away. We couldn’t see the stars and had no idea where we were at for miles. We just plodded along, or “wogged"until we got into Lone Pine. Lone Pine was lovely, and the trip up the Whitney Port als road was grueling, but reminded me of some of the crazy stuff we do here in the Incline Club. That was one of my best times in the run. Another outstanding element of this race was that the crews and runners were all so supportive and positive of each other. There were a lot of selfless acts of kindness out on the course. I am still recovering. My feet are still swollen, and I find it hard type, and my thoughts are still unorganized. I don’t know why this is. But hopefully it will all go away because I can’t wait to be back on Pikes Peak on Sunday.

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Vail Hill Climb - Vail - July 7, 2002

Andy Dimmen reports:
Distance: 7.5 miles
Goal:
Results: 6th overall--54:07
Website: http://www.vailrec.com

General Summary:
Things started pretty bad when half way into my warm-up I developed a nasty knot on the lateral portion of my quad right along the IT Band. I tried to ream it out, but it was no use. However, I just tried to put it out of my mind and race. The first 1.5 miles were on flat, paved streets through Vail and consequently people went out too fast. I just hung back and relaxed. As the trail began to climb, I passed a big group and put a gap on them. For most of the last half of the race I battled one of my old coaches. Since he was not much of a mountain runner, I caught him on the steeper sections and he pulled away on the flat sections (he is a sub 4 minute miler and 13 minute 5 K guy). I just didn’t have the speed to pass him. Had I done more work on the flats I probably could have hurt him with an intense surge. Overall, I was somewhat pleased with how I ran. I would have hoped to go a little faster and place a little higher, but considering how I felt, it was a good effort.

Things Done Right:
I went out conservatively and steadily moved up for the first 1/3 of the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I haven’t done enough fast running on the flats. Having more speed could have improved my time significantly.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a great course if you want a shorter, faster race.

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Matt Von Thun reports:
Distance: 7.5mi
Goal: 58 min (Top 10)
Results: 57:19 (18th overall)
Website: http://www.vailrec.com

General Summary:
The Vail hill climb is 7.5 mile run starting in the town of Vail (8000ft) and ending at the “Eagle’s Nest” near the top of the gondola on Vail mountain (10,000ft).

I drove up to Vail Sunday morning from Lakewood on 4 hours of sleep. Combined with marginal sleep the previous three days, I felt exhausted before the race even began (see things done wrong). Therefore, I mentally gave up on my goal of getting under 58 minutes, and decided that I would just try to make it to the end without bonking.

The weather was warm and sunny from the start (75 degrees). The first mile ran through the city and was very flat, I ran an easy comfortable pace and let the pack leave me far behind. Just after the first mile, as we started climbing, I kept up my cadence, shortened my stride a little, and was pleased to find the hill felt no more difficult than the flat first mile. From here on in, I slowly but consistently passed runners. I had enough left in the tank at the end to out sprint a couple of runners that I had paced with the last mile or so.

Things Done Right:
1. Did not go out too fast.
2. Got to the race early enough to find the registration table and warm up.

Things Done Wrong:
1. Poor Sleep: Due to a Wedding the night before and a series of pre-wedding parties the previous 3 nights, I hadn’t gotten to bed before 12:30am in 4 days.

Any Other Stuff:
Vail ski area allows runners to use the gondola to get back down the mountain. This is by far the best system I’ve ever seen for getting back down a mountain after a race. No waiting, no crowding into a stinky school bus, and nice views.

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John Goodloe reports:
Distance: 7.5 miles
Goal: 1:10 +/-
Results: 1:05

General Summary:
My first time running this race. The weather was fine, just the usual jitters about not knowing what to expect. The first 1-1/2 miles of the course is basically a road race, flat and on pavement. This caused a lot of runners to go out fast, but passing them back was easy as the whole course is a road.

Things Done Right:
Some usual things: well hydrated, pretty good pacing, being carefull with an unknown course. Walked a few steps to get my heart rate back down about 3 times.

Things Done Wrong:
Poor preparation. I should have been on the treadmill more the past month with the incline way up. All I could think about during the race was how difficult next week’s Mountain Race is going to be!

Any Other Stuff:
The race finish is spectacular, at the top of a ski run with views towards the back of Vail. Marilyn rode the gondola up to the finish, then we hung out there and enjoyed the view. Oh, and CoolMax Shirts for the finishers (We hope this is a trend)!!


Summer Roundup 12K - Colorado Springs, CO - July 7, 2002

Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 12K on trails
Goal: 50 minutes
Results: 49:21

General Summary:
Course changed from previous years due to rain that caused the normal course to be unusable. Temperature was about 60 degrees F at start. Air was humid from rain. One mild hill to mention, fairly flat.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated fully
Did exactly what I do to prepare for training runs
Ran my pace

Things Done Wrong:
Did not run course beforehand.

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Robert Castaldi reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: Have Fun
Results: 49.13
Website: http://www.pprrun.org

General Summary:
Recent rains washed out a small section of the trail, which caused part of the run course to be modified. Stayed with leading women for about 7K, then picked up my pace. Final kilometer was solid, which allowed me to pass others and finish 4th in AG.

Things Done Right:
Stayed focused until the finish line. Concentrated on running form and controlled breathing towards the finish.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not have a good warmup. This run started fast, should have elevated by HR slightly during warmup.

Any Other Stuff:
Saw many people wearing IC shirts. These same shirts took Overall and AG awards. What is it with the shirts??

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Glen Ash reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: 57:22
Results: 57:20 : )

General Summary:
It’s nice to be able to set your race goal after the race but that was last years time and I just wanted to get close.

Things Done Right:
Steady pace and training with the IC’ers tamed the hills at the end.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
The course was changed, do to water damage, but caused no problems.

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Laura Mitchell reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: Top 10 finish
Results: 5th overall female, 53:22

General Summary:
What a beautiful day for a race! It was cool, calm, a little overcast, and there was a touch of humidity in the air. The trail was mostly flat due to a last minute change of the course because of the rain we had on Friday. I felt very good during the race. I saw many people with IC shirts, and a lot of them received awards! Yea!

Things Done Right:
I woke up early enough, and had my coffee and bagel. I wore my IC singlet and my visor. I arrived at the race with plenty of time and didn’t feel rushed. I was well hydrated, and ate a Carb Boom before the race, and half way through the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I was unfamiliar with the race course, and held back a little on the easy first four miles. I should have “Gone out hard".

Any Other Stuff:

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John O'Donnell reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: Set pr
Results: 103:13
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Good run finished strong at the end. Humid got hot-
clouds to start. Sweat like a dog. TOOK OFF 2 MINUTES
FROM LAST YEAR.

Things Done Right:
Took plenty of fluids. Used gel packs. Set a good pace for the hills.

Things Done Wrong:
Aid stations people helping to bunched up and lost time because of that.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice to see so many ICers out there. As a group I think we did very good.

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Al Alvares reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: One Hour
Results: 146 20/54 43 1:01:16
Website: http://wwwpikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Not sure why I signed up for a race a week before the Barr Trail Mt. Race. I wanted a good training run and to establish a consistent effort for the entire race. This was my best time by over a minute in three years.

Things Done Right:
Perfect pace. Felt great after the race. Did not over-stress my body. Good training run. If I wasn’t tapering for BTMR I think I could have come in under and hour.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
Course was changed due to too much rain (go figure) the night before the race. Nice to see so many incline club folks at the race!!

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Sherry Alvares reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: 1:08
Results: 1:11:12
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
I wanted to do my best but not get too exhausted since I’m planning on doing the Barr Trail Mountain Race next weekend.

Things Done Right:
Definitely did not get too tired.

Things Done Wrong:
I’m battling an IT-band problem and had to stop and stretch about 5 times. It started feeling better after running about 6 miles. BUMMER!

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Keith Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: 1:00
Results: 1:00:37

General Summary:
After the GoG, I’m pleased to have done better this time. It was also nice to see lots of ICers at the race!

Things Done Right:
It was difficult (ha!), but only did 3x repeats on Serpentine Dr. Thurs eve. I kept my effort even during the race, getting passed occasionally on a couple hills (I caught most of ‘em on the downhills).
Overall: felt good.

Things Done Wrong:

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Kenneth Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 1:03, 9 minute Miles
Results: 1:00:50ish

General Summary:
Great race, I started a little faster then I had hoped, but I was able to pull in the reins and keep a steadier pace nearly the whole race. Only had to walk three ties, once at mile 5.5ish, once on the upside of the dastardly hill, and the third time was on the other side of the final hill, where I got a slight cramp. Other then that, I came in under 15 seconds behind my dad (so close to beating him), felt exhausted, and recovered quickly.

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Bryan S. Willis reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: to run 7.30 miles
Results: 53.49

General Summary:
I thought the racing staff had well placed aid stations and a friendly finish line.

Things Done Right:
I started the race well; then halfway through, I settled into my steady pace and finished well.

Things Done Wrong:
I did not treat this run as a real race. I could have run a better time.

Any Other Stuff:
There were several other incline runners at the race and I think they are all awesome!!!! Congratulations Case, on your first place victory!!!!

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Lance Thibault reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal: 52 min
Results: 54min 59sec

General Summary:
Really nice day for a race. Not too hot or too dry.
Wasn’t real impressed with the course. I didn’t mind the running under roads and through tunnels, but I didn’t like running to a spot and turning back around multiple times that this course had.

Things Done Right:
Stretched out, warmed up and hydrated before the race. Also remember my watch! (maybe that was a bad thing)

Things Done Wrong:
Even though the first few miles of the course are down hill, my first 3 miles were way too fast. I looked at my watch at mile 1 and realized I needed to slow down. I looked again at mile 3 and realized I didn’t slow down much at all. Pretty much bonked on the hill part of the course.

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Richard Hedlind reports:
Distance: 12 K
Goal:
Results: 55.18
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
A nice trail race with some cooler temperature.
Was determined to go out hard from the beginning. Managed to keep an even pace through the whole race without any slacking at the end. Whipped my 3 mile PR on the first 3 miles.

Things Done Right:
I brought my waist Camelback which allowed me to avoid trying to drink from a cup while running.

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
It was hard to find room to pass people between mile 1.5 and 4.5 which was out and back style.

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Stephen Martin reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: 55 mins
Results: 54:48

General Summary:
Finished. Tha'ts about it.

Things Done Right:
Ran stronger than I have in the past in the
last mile..
Pushed the last 1/2 mile to pass a couple people..

Things Done Wrong:
Went out a little too fast the first mile.. Was
slightly downhill though, but still I had planned on
a slower first mile. Didn't happen.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was altered for the recent flooding,
so we didn't make it over to Monument Valley
park. Probably would have been better with
fewer hairpin turnarounds than this course.

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Gordon Neal reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: Under 56
Results: 55:29

General Summary:
I was pleased with my effort.

Things Done Right:
I spent the week backpacking and climbing 14ers and I thought that it would hurt my performance. After starting out slow, thinking that I would die later, I found that I really picked it up after mile 2. When I did GOG, I had just returned from a sea level trip and I really died. This time I returned from a week at altitude and Colorado Springs actually felt like it had plenty of air. Altitude training must work!

Things Done Wrong:
I Probably should have gone out hard right from the start.

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Vicki Martin reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: Somewhere between 55 & 60 m.
Results: 1 hr, 6 seconds

General Summary:
I liked the race better than I thought. Seemed to go very fast for some reason, maybe because I was enjoying it more. Anyhoo the weather was perfect too!

Things Done Right:
Slept well, ate well,etc. mentally got into my day! Felt strong from all the training this past year!

Things Done Wrong:
Not sure I did anything wrong except one woman passed me much too close to the end. Should have pushed harder, I hate that!

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Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: 70 minutes
Results: 63 minutes

General Summary:
Great race, the downhill at the start allowed for a good, fast warmup, of course what goes down must come back up (at the end of the race). With the rain the course was changed and actually allowed for a fast finish as well.

Things Done Right:
Left the big camelback in the car, got there earlier than we usually do to pick up the packet which made the start much more relaxed.

Things Done Wrong:
Forgot the date until I read Matt’s newsletter, caused a little panic Saturday night.

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Jonathan Veteto reports:
Distance: 12k
Goal: ? better than last year
Results: about 6 min better
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
nice way to start a Sunday. great to see Kees win the race !

Things Done Right:
ran consistently, not too hard, not too easy.

Things Done Wrong:
didn’t push too hard at the beginning

Any Other Stuff:
I don’t like running on bike path by the power plant. i think it smells funny and has a lot of trash. :( I think they should have kept the old course and made us go over the ‘water hazard’ by bijou. make it more interesting !

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Bill Ransom reports:
Distance: 12 k
Goal: 1 hour
Results: 1:03
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Nice race. Course had to be changed due to bridge wash out on Friday.

Things Done Right:
Had a good time.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t run hard enough.

Any Other Stuff:
Lots of Incline Club folks.

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Elisabeth Kaegi reports:
Distance: 12K
Goal: To have fun and try to beat 1:00
Results: 1:03

General Summary:
This was my first time doing this race. So, I was not sure what to expect--how difficult the course is, how long it would take me to complete it, etc. The race seemed to be well organized. Fast first half or so, though I was disappointed with my overall time.

Things Done Right:

Things Done Wrong:
I definitely need to spend more time doing speedwork--but where to find the time?

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Kees Guijt reports:
Races: Garden and Summer roundup
Goal: Get a staR without doing club runs
Result: #3 in GOG, #1 in SRU

General Summary:
First of all: I shouldn’t have to do a report since it was in the Gazette and actually Yvonne signed us (me and scary Larry) in when we visited her aid station. But ah well here we go...
I expected to do better than last year in the Garden by roughly 1-2 min, which should be a finish time between 57 and 58 min. I did change my time by about a minute! Unfortunately it was a minute slower... It was hot, but probably hanging a ceiling fan standing on a ladder for a few hours on Friday didn’t help, and eating non-approved food items on Saturday night wasn’t the brightest idea either. Soooo, for the roundup run I definitely didn’t hang another ceiling fan and I only ate approved food-items. It was cool to learn that #2 was a pretty fast high-school kid (9:20 2 mile at altitude), and #4 was a 2:17 marathon runner (he is only doing 2:30’s now...).

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Palmer Lake 4mi - Palmer Lake - July 4, 2002

Jonathan Veteto reports:
Distance: 4 miles
Goal: 26 minutes
Results: 27:5?

General Summary:
Fun race. Nice, wide trail, not too hot, tons of people from monument everywhere (they have a parade the morning of the 4th). Race was from palmer lake to monument.

Things Done Right:
Well hydrated, had morning coffee. got to the race early and had time to hang out with lots of friends. Met Antonio’s father (also Antonio) :)

Things Done Wrong:
Should have noticed when the race started :) a couple of us were chatting *far* away from the start. didn’t even know the race was going until someone asked if I was going to run ! ha !

Any Other Stuff:
One way course. a great thing happened in that my buddy Kyle and I found a friend of ours who was watching the parade with his family. He loaned us his car so we were able to drive back to palmer lake and get the car. what a way to start a holiday ! :)

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Schoolcraft Firecracker 5-mile - Schoolcraft, MI - July 4, 2002

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 5-miles
Goal: 6-minute pace (30-minutes)
Results: 30:20 (6:04 pace)
Website: http://www.kalamazootrackclub.org

General Summary:
Used it as a tempo run since I was missing the usual Thursday hill workout. I’ve been flat-landing it for a week in Michigan, visiting my family. And yes, it’s been hot and humid! It was no different during the race (I’m guessing it was around 85 degrees and 100% humidity at 8am).

Things Done Right:
Drank plenty of water. Kept pretty even splits throughout the workout (race).

Things Done Wrong:
Asked the weather controllers for a cooler morning!

Any Other Stuff:
Flat, fast. Perfect for a tempo workout.


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5K Race for Otter House (child care) - Castine, Maine - 4th July, 2002

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: actually 3.5 miles !
Goal: 8:00 miles
Results: 29:19

General Summary:
First annual — and it showed! Paper numbers that dropped off as soon as they got sweaty; unmeasured course that got a few people mad (not me!); timing so screwed up that the masters winning time was recorded as three seconds slower than mine, instead of 75 seconds faster? Reminded me of what road races used to be like — great!

Things Done Right:
Drank a beer with my fish and chips the night before the race.

Things Done Wrong:
Only drank one beer!

Any Other Stuff:
Castine is a beautiful north Maine town of about 2000 residents, where 50% of the residents are wealthy Boston and New York’ers with summer homes. The town sits at the end of a peninsular, jutting into the Penobscot Bay. There are ruins of about five forts in town, primarily British, and the town was fought for by Dutch, French, British and, ultimately, by the “rebels"! The main reason that this tiny town attracted such attention was because, at the time (1600-1780), it was one of the best places in the world to harvest tall straight trees of the type used for sailing ship masts. Time change, eh?
Sarah’s Paternal ancestors date back in Castine to the early 1700’s, having come over from Kent, England three years prior to moving the Maine.
A little known fact: Paul Revere was Courts Marshaled for cowardice in the area of Castine, for running away from the enemy (Brits of course).

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Sharon 5 Mile Road Race - Sharon, Massachusetts - June 30, 2002

Neal Oseland reports:
Distance: 5 Miles
Goal: 30 minutes/top 10 overall
Results: 29:47/6th place overall

General Summary:
I was in the Boston area on a 2 week vacation and wanted to race. Well I sure had my options. There were races on 12 of the 15 days I was there. Unbelievable running scene. I went out a bit too hard in 5:50 but finished strong with a 5:45 final mile. The stuff in between was pretty sporadic. I was racing the field, not the clock. It was fun racing against people I din’t know and had never seen. I was able to push myself not knowing if the person next to me would break away. I certainly missed the trails of Colorado. Everything is so congested and the trails are a lot harder to find for an out of towner.

Things Done Right:
Prepared by sleeping well for 2 days and not doing anything too hard in the days leading up to the race.

Things Done Wrong:
When someone tried to break away, I stayed with him. I should have known better as both times this happened, the person was really breathing hard when they tried to go by. I should have just let them as they ended up considerably further back.

Any Other Stuff:
One loop around a beautiful lake. About 220 runners. A lot of spectators.

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Tour du Lac (Tour of the Lake) - Bucksport - Sat. June 29th, 2002

Fred Wright reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: To beat my GoG time
Results: Made it by seven minutes — which doesn’t say a lot!

General Summary:
Maine experienced unusually hot and humid weather, lasting from end June through mid July, and race day start time of 7 a.m. saw 80 degrees and 92% humidity.
Surprisingly difficult course, with long gradual climbs and short steep descents. However, it was a beautiful course.

Things Done Right:
Plenty of endurance.

Things Done Wrong:
No road speed. Must mix in more long road intervals or races, if I intend to do some road races.
Only two days off the plane did not seem enough time to acclimate.

Any Other Stuff:
After two years at altitude, I expected to “fly” when running again at sea level. WRONG! It took 10 days before I had any spring in my step, and the effect was like running in molasses.

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10K @ 10,000 feet - Vail, CO - June 23rd

Elizabeth Ahola + Mikko Ahola reports:
Distance: 10K
Goal: to have fun and not get sick (see things done wrong)
Results: Elizabeth(1hr 4min.) Mikko (56 min)
Website: http://www.vailrec.com/adult/running_races/index.html

General Summary:
It was a great summer day for a race. Hot, blue skies and no wind.

The race started at 9am mid-Vail. We got to mid-Vail via the Lionshead Gondola.

The course is a 10K loop and there were water stations at miles 2 and 5. Water was handed out in little dixie cups which I didn’t like.

The first 2mi of the race is on a catwalk/dirt road to a single track, all up. Miles 3-5 are on single track traversing hill sides with short uphills, but mostly going down. I’m sure the scenery is beautiful but unless you slow down you had to concentrate on your footing.

Mile 5 is located at the top of Lionshead Gondola and there is about a 1/4 — 1/2 mile hill (the last). The last 1/4 mile or so had you traversing above the finish line which was great for the final push.

Things Done Right:
Tried to carbo load as much as possible on short notice. Did taper well (hadn’t run for 5 days). Started — Finished — and tried hard.

Things Done Wrong:
We tried out the theory that some are able to run well with a few beers and a bottle of wine the night before. It was a great day for testing the theory and the experiment results were false. (We just couldn’t pass up 25 cent Fosters and a free bottle of wine with dinner.)

We were dehydrated and shaky, but popped a few Advil and sucked it in. Besides — we had already paid for the baby sitter and 10K at 10,000 feet is just another casual/easy run for an ICer.

Any Other Stuff:
At the end of the race you get a nice t-shirt and a goodie bag full of treats. There were sports/fruit drinks available too.

Since you start and finish at mid-Vail you have the option to run down to town or take the Gondola. We opted to run down.

In hind sight we would of brought our Mt. Bikes up with us on the gondola.

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Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: Be faster than the 2001 winning time
Results: 2nd overall woman/47:12 (8-seconds faster than ‘01 winning time)
Website: http://www.vailrec.com

General Summary:
Beautiful day and a great opportunity to get a good workout at altitude. The race started at mid-Vail (10,000ft +). The first two miles were climbing, then a nice, steady descent the last 4 miles. There was a small descent at mile 5. Two aid stations on course and plenty of post-race refreshments, a nice t-shirt and Teva trail running shoes to the top-three age-group winners in each age division. The top-three overall male and female also received a pair of Teva trail running shoes. Overall, a fun race that was well-organized.

Things Done Right:
Ran my own race. Knew the first-place woman would leave me on the climb, so I focused on the descents.

Things Done Wrong:
Need to work on my climbing strength. It still doesn’t feel 100%, but I’m getting there!

Any Other Stuff:
Glad I went to altitude for a race, even though I had a headache for the rest of the day on Sunday! Got in about 2+ hours of running at altitude (with warmup, race and cooldown). A few of us ran back to Lionshead from the race start/finish...it was fun. A nice descent on the Berrypicker trail.

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Run for Childs sake 5k/10k - Denver - June 16, 2002

Neal Oseland reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: 39:00
Results: 38:23/3rd place overall

General Summary:
I ran a pretty consistent pace throughout the entire race. I didn’t get caught up in anyone else's race so I was able to maintain my pace and pass a few people in the final 2 miles. It was a hot day but since the race was on the trails, it was almost completely covered by trees so not a lot of direct sunlight. It wasn’t a big race-most of the people were in the 5k. I think there were only 80-90 people in the 10k. It was just fun to be racing again.

Things Done Right:
Ran consistently.

Things Done Wrong:
Was a bit dehydrated and felt it near the end.

Any Other Stuff:
The course was VERY boring. It was a couple of loops on the outlying trail around Washington Park. The 5k was all on the interior pavement.

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Cheddar Challenge Trail Run - Alpine Valley Resort, East Troy, WI - 06/16/02

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 10k
Goal: win
Results: won...male and female
Website: http://www.usacycling.org/mtb

General Summary:
This trail run was small, but the course was super. It was run on the same course as the PRO mountain bike race. (I was at a NORBA National Championship Series mountain bike event for work). A little muddy in spots, with some small climbs and short descents.

Things Done Right:
Ran it like a tempo run. Ran 5 miles earlier in the morning to get my legs stretched out. Ran my own race, ran the tangents...ended up catching the first place guy about halfway through. He was a decent runner, too...former collegiate runner and 2:38 marathoner. It was definately a cool feeling to actually cross the finish line in front of the first guy...yeah, ladies!

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t beat the guy by bigger margin...only won by 30-seconds. Just kidding.

Any Other Stuff:
Last year, these trail runs were organized by AATRA. This year, the mountain bike promoter is organizing the events (you could tell the difference). AATRA did a much better job of promoting and organizing the run. AATRA also drew good runners from the region which generated more excitement and participation.


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Mt Washington Road Race - Pinkham Notch, NH - 06/15/02

Matt Von Thun reports:
Distance: Shortened to 3.8mi, typically 7.6mi
Goal: Place in top 40, time of 1hr 20min or better
Results: 20th place, time 31:42
Website: http://www.gsrs.com/mwrr/

General Summary:
In terms of distance and elevation gain the Mt. Washington race is like half a Pikes Peak Ascent. Mt. Washington is reported to have the worst weather in U.S. and this year for the first time in 42 years, the organizers felt the weather was bad enough that they had to shorten the race to the half way point (50mph winds and freezing rain above tree line closed the highway). The weather at the bottom however, was pretty descent (40’s and light rain). Because of the shortened format, the race was now very similar to our tempo run from Hydro to No Name.
In the race tried keep a pace which required the same perceived effort as the Barr Trail tempo runs. Half way to the finish, I felt so good that I sped up, and probably passed 20 people including one of the elite Kenyans who apparently went out too fast.

Things Done Right:
My training runs with the IC up Barr Trail followed by Serpentine road were ideal for this race. I also hydrated like crazy during my plane ride the day before the race.

Things Done Wrong:
I may have been too conservative in my pacing. I had plenty of extra energy at the end of the race.

Any Other Stuff:
I felt a little cheated not being able to race to the summit, so a couple days after the race, I ran up the trail from Pinkham notch to the summit via the Tuckerman Ravine/ Lion’s Head trail. There were several spots on the top half of the trail that are not very runnable, but it was very enjoyable.

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Apple Duathlon - Sartell, Minnesota - June 15

Sue Lloyd reports:
Distance: 10k run, 42k bike, 5k run
Goal: top 2 in my age group(45-49), to qualify for world duathlon championship
Results: 4th in age group
Website: http://appleduathlon.com

General Summary:
Can an ICer do multisport events??? I’ve found duathlons to be a great way to mix up my training and stay healthy. The day was slightly humid and cool. The run course had one pretty good hill on it (in Minnesota they might call it a really BIG hill). The bike course was rolling with a long straight flat section next to the Mississippi for the last 12k.
I ran a P.R. in the 10k! Splits: 53:40, 1:19.**, 28:**. Transitions were 36 and 38 seconds.

Things Done Right:
Rested well the week before the race. Stuck to my race plan regarding heart rate during the race. Had great transitions.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t hydrate enough on the bike. Had a tough time staying focused, concentrating while on the bike.

Any Other Stuff:
This race was one of the best organized and run that I have ever been to. The volunteers were incredible...enthusiastic, friendly and helpful. I was disappointed not to qualify for worlds.

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Arizona Road Racers Summer Series #2 - Phoenix, AZ - June 15, 2002

Sherry Alvares reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: 26 min
Results: 25:02 min
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com

General Summary:
About 520 showed up for this early marning 5K race. Used timing chips to record results causing less panic at the starting line.

Things Done Right:
Training wtih the IC club.

Things Done Wrong:
Spent week before race in Las Vegas — too many margaritas, Krispy Kreme donuts and buffet lines!

Any Other Stuff:
Race was mainly on streets and sidewalks through a park and neighborhood. Temperature at 6:30 am start was 80 degrees.

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Al Alvares reports:
Distance: 5K
Goal: 24:00
Results: 22:52
Website: http://www.arizonaroadracers.com

General Summary:
The pre race announcer warned us of a “hill” at the end of the race. Ha Ha!! I actually ran into a high school track coach the next day who did the race and commented on how difficult the hill was. I’m still not sure there was actually a hill in the race.

Things Done Right:
Good consistent pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Running in Arizona in the summer.
Getting up at 4 am to make it to the race.

Any Other Stuff:
There were no forest fires but two people did spontaneously combust on the course. It must be common as no one stopped to extinguish them.

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Garden of the Gods 10 Mile - Garden of the Gods - June 9, 2002

Fred Wright reports:
Goal: Beat last year’s time
Results: Failed by over four minutes!

General Summary:
The classic, beautiful, G.O.G’s course, rolling blacktop, pretty hot, lots of people.

Things Done Right:
New racing flats didn’t blister my feet.

Things Done Wrong:
1.Dehydrated.
2.Lost a lot of sleep the night, and the months before.
3. Ran to the summit of P.P. the Sunday before!
4. Went to the race — rather then do the Club workout.

Any Other Stuff:
- The race organization and volunteers were excellent, as was the after race food and drinks.
- Very nice “T” this year.
- An enjoyable afternoon party given, for I/C’ers and Yvonne and Matt, by delightful hosts Lynn and Gary Hellenga.

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Daiva Cooper reports:
Goal: 2:00
Results: 1:46:07
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Garden of the Gods is a beautiful course. It was a pretty hot morning, but the scenery always makes up for the weather. I ran the race with my 2 cousins from Chicago and we had a blast!

Things Done Right:
1. Trained very well for the course. Legs felt great the whole race.
2. Drank enough, and dumped enough water on my head to stay cool
3. Paced myself well for the big hills

Things Done Wrong:
1. Need to incorporate some speedwork into my weekly running to have a stronger “kick” in the last mile.

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Glen Ash reports:
Goal: Under 80 min
Results: 80 min 13 sec

General Summary:
I felt I was trained for the hills and the distance and finished
strong. I didn’t feel like the warm weather affected my
race, although I did stop at all the water stations, well maybe 14 sec.

Things Done Wrong:
Start my speed work earlier in the year.

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Lance Thibault reports:
Goal: 75 min and no injuries
Results: 74 min 55 sec

General Summary:
Overall, it was a good, first ever, race for me. The temperature was about 30 degrees warmer then I’d prefer, but it’s June, so just about every time I run it’s warmer then I’d prefer. Found that the ups on the course were a little tougher then I expected, but I’m sure they would have been much worse if I hadn’t been running with the Incline Club. Although happy with my results, had all the things in the “Things Done Wrong” section not happened I may have been able to break into the top 100. Oh well...it wasn’t goal.

Things Done Right:
Showed up early enough (6 a.m.) to pick up my shirt and race number while still giving myself time to hydrate, stretch out and wake up. I didn’t set any real high goal for this race, because it’s not what I’m training for. I went into the race knowing this and tried to keep it in mind while I was running. Although it was tough to pace myself on the ups and down of the course, I kept in mind that race didn’t mean a whole lot to me. So I never found myself pushing to hard on the ups, or trying to over do it on the downs and managed to reach my goal time injury free.

Things Done Wrong:
First thing I realized was that pacing myself on an unfamiliar course wasn’t going to be hard enough, so I manage to forget my watch. Second thing was that I stayed up too late watching the Tyson/Lewis fight, then the triple overtime Red Wings game. I probably also spent a bit to much time in the sun Friday and Saturday and was feeling pretty lethargic race morning. Lastly, I found out a week ago that I’m not a big fan of the Power Gels. They seem to make me thirstier than I already am while running. Unfortunately I was out of GUs so I stopped by 7-11 and reluctantly picked up some more Power Gels and of course I got the same result.

Any Other Stuff:
I think the thing that helped me the most, was that prior to the race, I didn’t think too much about it. I tried to look at it as just another training day for the Ascent. While I was hanging around the start line I noticed I wasn’t real nervous and didn’t have much adrenaline rush going on. Which to me, was a good thing. It kept me from going out to hard the fist mile or so. I saw quit a few ICer’s out there. Because I forgot my watch, some of them, (probably unknowingly) helped me with my pace. Because I knew what they were shooting for, (assuming they were on their goal pace) I figured I must be close to my pace. I guess it worked pretty good since I crossed the finish line within 5 secs of my goal. Who needs a watch right!!

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Richard Hedlind reports:
Goal: 1.20.00
Results: 1.23.06

General Summary:
My first “shorter” race, only done marathon distance before. Therefore it was a challenge to find the right pace. My goal was to do 8 minute miles on average. Close enough. Overall a fun race.

Things Done Right:
Stayed well hydrated before the race. Also made sure to follow the tips I have gotten from running with the IC. Stayed upright going uphill for easier breathing and to leaned forward downhill to go faster and get less impact on joints.

Things Done Wrong:
Did not eat right the night before the race. My stomach was a bit upset on race morning and the first miles were therefore more painful than necessary.
I also held back too much and therefore had too much energy left at the finish line.

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Gordon Barnett reports:
Goal: To beat my time from last year: 1:24:14
Results: 1:20:45
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/Gog_general_info.htm

General Summary:
For some reason this race intimidates me, I can’t seem to run my marathon pace over 10 miles.

Things Done Right:
Maintained a steady pace throughout. Felt strong on the uphills and tried to run the downhills harder. Felt strong at the finish, accomplished my goal. (PR by almost 4 minutes).

Any Other Stuff:
Hot for a 7:00 A.M. start. No noticeable smoke in the air from the recent fires. The starter announced that due to drought conditions and water shortages, there would be no water misters on the course.

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Vicki Martin reports:
Goal: To beat time 3 yrs. ago, 1.28.01
Results: 1 hr. 22.09 Yea!

General Summary:
I felt really good throughout the race.
Felt strong on uphills and downhills.
Strong enough to still pass runners in last two miles.

Things Done Right:
Did the usual things to prepare.
Certainly all the Sunday training is the right
thing ;-)

Things Done Wrong:
I need to push harder, I think later I could have.
Soooo.. maybe more mental work-outs.

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Stephen Martin reports:
Goal: 1 hr 15 mins
Results: 1 hr 16 : 37

General Summary:
Started out strong the first 2 miles..then dropped into
a steadier but slower pace. About a minute and a half off of pace at the halfway point, so I knew I was in for a struggle to hit the goal time. Overall felt my cadence was good and my uphill effort was stronger than last year.

Things Done Right:
Strong first couple of miles. Strong last mile.
Uphill cadence was better.

Things Done Wrong:
Could have run faster downhill, I felt like I passed more people going uphill, but many caught up to me running the downhills.
9th mile my pace dropped considerably, so maybe went out too fast at the start.

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John O’Donnell reports:
Goal: Set PR
Results: 1:31:04
Website: http://www.pprrun.org

General Summary:
Pushed very hard the last mile. Good to see all the training and going for that PR paid off.

Things Done Right:
Plenty of fluids and running the course smartly.

Things Done Wrong:
Partied too much with my son and friends on his 21st birthday.

Any Other Stuff:
Nice to see so many incline club members.

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Dave Sorenson reports:
Goal: Ahhh, to enjoy the day
Results: 1:44:54
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
This was a good day for me. I prepared well for the heat by drinking everything in sight — lots of water on Saturday, 4 cups before the race, and 2 cups at each water stop. Thus surprisingly, I wasn’t affected by the heat too much. During the last series of hills from mile 8 to past mile 9, I was the one passing people on the hills. Yes, they were walking, but I still count it as a valid pass.

Things Done Right:
Ran most of the Tuesday/Thursday training runs in the Garden of the Gods (18 out of 20). There’s no substitute for practicing on those hills. I keep plugging away with the Sunday long runs for the endurance aspect of things.

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John Thompson reports:
Goal: 90 Minutes
Results: 1:35:05
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Weather was beautiful around 70 at the start and 80 at the end. There were over 1100 runners. The race was downhill for the first two miles and then up and down for the next 8 miles. The course ran through Garden of the Gods, as usual, the scenery was awesome. I wasn’t as fast as I had hoped, but I felt good throughout the entire race and had a great time.

Things Done Right:
Started at the back of the pack so I would be the one doing the passing throughout the race. Ran for enjoyment, I wasn’t going to win so I just plodded along and enjoyed the run with 1100 people Used the downhills to make up my slow uphills. I attribute feeling much better on the uphills to training with the Incline Club.

Things Done Wrong:
Skipped the 1st water station, I don’t think it affected the race much, but it was the only time in the race I wasn’t comfortable. I was happy to see the next water station. Breakfast may have been little to small. I took it easy on myself. Never really ran to the point were I felt I needed to slow down.

Any Other Stuff:
Saw lots of Incline Club Tee Shirts.

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Larry Miller reports:
I believe the Garden of the Gods may have had more Incline Club runners than the
training run on Pikes Peak. I had a rough count of 30. We should get “*”s and you all should have to write the reports! My report is as follows:
I started, I followed, I finished. Darn Andy Kovats out-spirited me at the finish.

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Jim Freim reports:
Distance: 10
Goal: To enjoy
Results: 1:17

General Summary:
Held back on first two easy miles and then used even pace to finish. With no speed or road training, very pleased with results. Enjoyed the day.

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Jonathan Veteto reports:
Distance: 10m
Goal: 1:10
Results: 1:17

General Summary:
I like the garden. Cool colors, lots of people, lots of friends. A hard race for me, I don’t like pavement running too much. However, there were *tons* of people from the club, fun friends, and loads of happy people. Great way to start the day.

Things Done Right:
Quality base earned through lots of club runs, hills are predictable and not too bad. Got lots of sleep Sat. night.

Things Done Wrong:
Still smarting after a mild flesh wound to the knee. Can’t stretch the left leg really. Definitely wasn’t hydrated enough. Not at 100% for this one, but hey — It happens :)

Any Other Stuff:
Was kinda unfortunate that they turned the showers off. I like the mister/shower thingies. John @ the running company has lots of great pictures if anyone is interested....

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J.D. Van Lancker reports:
Distance: 10M
Goal: under 80 minutes
Results: 78:57

General Summary:
beautiful morning, and lots of familiar faces (and shirts)... I vowed to myself to go slower at the start than I did last year; it’s so easy to get caught up “in it,” then burn out the legs... the first hill gave me a lot of confidence because I was passing people ... I kind of bonked near mile 7, then had a strong finish after I recovered during the downhill after mile 8 ... good fast finish, made up a little time ... very happy about the effort, but I know I have more in me to get to the mid to low 70’s.

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Laura Mitchell reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: run under 115 min.
Results: 114.35

General Summary:
I enjoyed the race. The only other time I ran this course was in the GOG race in 2000. I ran 126 minutes that day. I was happy with the almost 12 minute improvement! It was great to see all the other Clubbers there too. Many of you shouted encouragement to me during the race — thank you!

Things Done Right:
Train with Incline Club, and wear the club shirt! A lot of people recognized the shirt and cheered for me just because of that!

Things Done Wrong:
Slept in too late, felt rushed, and didn’t do all of my pre-race rituals. Didn’t do much speed work.

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Chris Britton reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 75 Minutes
Results: 81:44

General Summary:
Beautiful morning for a race, but warm.

Things Done Right:
Well rested and hydrated in last 24 hours before race.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have arrived at registraton area earlier. Line at porta-potties almost cause me to miss the start of the race. Ran hard late in the week and had tired legs for the race. Should have taken off 2 days instead of only 1.

Any Other Stuff:
The heat must have gotten to me; I thought I saw Bill Rogers coming up the hill about half way through the race!

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Hope I’m not too late to submit a brief race report to
earn an “R” for Sunday, June 9. Following the format
used by others, here goes:

Robert Castaldi reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: Have Fun
Results:Good (not great)

General Summary:
The classic, beautiful, G.O.G’s course, rolling
blacktop, pretty hot, lots of people.

Things Done Right:
Rest the day before the race (albiet, the rest was not
planned).

Things Done Wrong:
On Saturday morning, while working at home, I slipped
and received a 6 inch slice on my leg. Fortunately, I
did not need stitches, but I ruined 2 towels trying to
stop the bleeding. It caused me to spend Sat
afternoon on the couch, instead of riding my bike. My
leg was stiff and sore on Sunday morning, but I was
able to run.

Any Other Stuff:
Time was 1:09 and change. The first time I’ve done
the race, therefore a PR.

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Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Finish
Results: Sure did, actually better than I thought I would
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Great race, well-organized. Parking availability was one of the best ever.

Things Done Right:
Kept my cast on as long as possible in the days before. Believe it or not, I listened to the doc this time (since we’ve worked together I thought I better). I lost training time but I was still able to run with minimal swelling during and after

Things Done Wrong:
I really need to find another pair of running shoes for road work. I like my trail shoes but they aren’t the greatest for asphalt especially with an injury

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Stephanie Jenkins reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Finish before the cut off
Results: Much better than that.

General Summary:
Ran my own pace, keeping the same pace that I train at so I was comfortable. I was happy to see a familiar ultramarathoner finish between Joel and I so I know we ran a good ultra pace.

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Sherry Alvares reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:40
Results: 1:34:19
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
This was my first race in over 10 years. Just showing up was a big deal for me.

Things Done Right:
All the training runs with the IC club paid off.

Things Done Wrong:
Ran too stressed out. Need to learn to relax.

Any Other Stuff:
I was pleased with my time and had a fun race.

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Al Alvares reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:24
Results: 1:26:37
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
Two minutes slower than last year overall.

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go out too fast like last year. Felt great at the end of the race. Was able to stand out in the sun for six more hours coaching soccer, attend two soccer parties and drive to Las Vegas that night!!

Things Done Wrong:
Went out too slow.

Stood out in the sun for 6 hours on Saturday and 3 hours Friday coaching soccer. Didn’t sleep well.

Any Other Stuff:
Beat my wife. Might be the last year I can say this!!

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Gordon Neal reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: Beat my previous time
Results: Missed by 3 minutes

General Summary:
Another well conducted Triple Crown event.

Things Done Right:
Signed up to run.

Things Done Wrong:
Returned from an international trip just two days before the race. I was jet lagged, feeling the altitude and pretty exhausted. I thought avoiding
running for several days before the race would get
me rested enough, but by mile 5 I knew I was wrong.

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Bryan Willis reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
General Summary:
The first two and a half miles was primarily downhill going in to the Garden of the Gods park. Needless to say I really stink running downhill and that’s when people passed me, but when a hill came up I “smoked” ‘em. I kept a steady pace all the way through the race and I am happy about that but I feel that I could have done better on my time had I not been babying my shin splints. There were several other incliners at this race. I think that they are all super people, the best!!!!!! My time was 73 minutes and 49 seconds. I was hoping to accomplish the race in 80 minutes or less, so that is one thing that I am happy about but I don’t think that I gave it my very best. Next year will be better. In conclusion this was a mild race with lots of friendly faces. The course was great with scenic beauty around every corner. I would definitely recommend this race to a runner who is looking for a fun run! My advice for running this race is to keep a steady pace all the way through and finish hard.

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Kevin Bruno reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 75 minutes or better
Results: 1:17:53
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org

General Summary:
It was a warm morning race blessed with a few cool breezes and stretches of welcome shade cast from the red rocks. Saw lots of familiar faces. Good turnout, good organization, good race.

Things Done Right:
Ran many of the Tues/Thur Garden training runs leading up to the race. Hydrated well the day before. Wore my sleeveless Incline Club shirt, applied sunscreen, stretched, downed a quart of water before the start, cut the corners and avoided the crowds on 30th street, and ended with a sprint finish.

Things Done Wrong:
Dropped my pace a notch on the warm uphill sections of the course, but failed to pick it up on the cool downhill stretches.

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Jen Yurenka reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: to finish with my dad (a flatlander who flew in 3 days prior)
Results: finished with my dad!! (the first race that we actually finished together)

General Summary:
Kept pointing out the Club shirts to my dad... little does he know that I ordered him one for Father’s Day. His running pals back in Michigan will be envious!

Things Done Right:
Drank lots o’ water.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have brought a Gu or two.

Any Other Stuff:
Was disappointed that the only PowerAde station was the very first one. Overall, a beautiful (albeit slow) run.

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Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: 1:05
Results: 1:07

General Summary:
Perfect day, a little warm. Glad it started at 7am. Went through 5 miles at 32:20, but lost too much time on miles 7 and 8 to hit my goal time.

Things Done Right:
Recorded splits at every mile. Went out at a good target pace.

Things Done Wrong:
Got off pace too much on miles 3,7,8. Gee, no wonder...those are the hardest miles!

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Keith Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 10mile
Goal: 1:25
Results: 1:29:11

General Summary:
Just plain off pace this year. Next year, next year...

Things Done Right:
Hydrated. Lots of long runs this year, so doing 10mi was easy.

Things Done Wrong:
Not enough speed work this season. I’m going to fix that. Not sure if it mattered, but I had a week of flatland travel with not enough sleep preceding the race. I could have been a bit worn down.

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Matt Von Thun reports:
Distance: 10mile
Goal: Use as a moderate paced tempo run.
Results: 1:09:44

General Summary:
I was concerned that running this race too hard would destroy my taper for the Mt. Washington race the following weekend, so I decided to run the course about 1min per mile slower that what would have been my goal pace.

Things Done Right:
Had fun, didn’t hurt myself.

Things Done Wrong:
Had I known the Mt. Washington race was going to be shortened, Iwould have run the race at full effort.

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Stephen Mitchell reports:
Distance: 10 miles on roads
Goal: 70 minutes
Results: 69:56

General Summary:
Course through beautiful Garden of the Gods. Weather was nice, slightly warm. Free massage after was new for me, seemed helpful. Aid stations nicely placed.

Things Done Right:
Hydrated fully
Did exactly what I do to prepare for training runs
Ran my pace

Things Done Wrong:
Dropped my Carbo-Boom at about mile 3 )-:

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David Reily reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Goal: Volunteer and have fun
Results: Did it!
Website: http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/Gog_general_info.htm

General Summary:
I volunteered to help at a water stop for this race. Worked the mile 4-8 aid station passing out water. Saw lots of Incline Club members. It was sunny and warm, so they needed it!

Things Done Right:
Got to see the race from a different viewpoint. Received a cool T-shirt with “Race Staff” on the back. Also brought my two boys to help pick up the cups from the ground.

Things Done Wrong:
I saw several of the volunteers stepping way out onto the course making some of the runners have to veer around them. I think the volunteers should review the dos and don’ts of passing out water.

Any Other Stuff:
Didn’t have the water sprayers this year because of the water shortage. I also was reminded that runners do not know what you’re passing out to them... so be sure to call it out! If you’ve never volunteered — try it at least once!

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Kenneth Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Results: 1:50 something

General Summary:
Nothing too horrible to tell, I started off too hard and ended up walking a good portion at the end. I wasn’t used to road running, and my thighs were plenty sore the next day.

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Neal Oseland reports:
Distance: 10 Miles
Goal: 1:10:
Results: 1:10:04

General Summary:
I hadn’t raced in many months and I used this to kind of see what kind of shape I was in. I didn’t run the entire month of April and was working myself back into shape when I decided to run this. Having never run this race, I took the advice of many and went out very conservatively for the first 2 miles. I felt great throughout the race. Not knowing my fitness level, I didn’t get the best out of myself in this race. I could have gone faster but am satisfied and now can use this as a starting point to get to where I want to be.

Things Done Right:
Went out conservatively.

Things Done Wrong:
Put on 11 pounds in April-makes things a lot harder.

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2002 Mile High 12-Hour - Chatfield State Park- Littleton, CO - June 8-9

Rick Pearcy reports:
Distance: As far as you can go in 12 hours
Goal: 50 miles
Results: 42.4 miles
Website: http://www.coachweber.com

General Summary:
A 12-hour night run in Chatfield State Park in Denver.
The Mile High 12-Hour course is a 5-mile circuit (2.5 miles out and 2.5 miles back) of which .2 miles is on a paved road and 4.8 miles is on a firmly packed dirt road. The altitude of the course is 5600 feet. The course has 4 short hills per 5-mile circuit.
The racers simply see how far they can run in 12 hours. The race started at 8:00PM on Saturday and finished at 8:00AM on Sunday.

Things Done Right:
My fluid (about 20-22 oz per hour)and my calorie intake (about 300 per hour) worked fine. I was never hungry or thirsty during the race, and I did not get sick or bonk.
My flashlight (an LED type I purchased through one of my flight magazines) lasted easily throughout the night without difficulties and without battery replacement.
Stayed on my feet and moving the whole time.

Things Done Wrong:
I was too conservative in my run/walk schedule. I could have ran more and walked less.

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Keith Grimes reports:
Distance: 12 hours of running time
Goal: 70 miles
Results: 66.8

General Summary:
I really wanted to run at least 70 miles. I had been sick the last 10 days before the race and was not sure how I would do or feel during the race. I had also rolled my left ankle 2 weeks before and slightly pulled my left adductor muscle during speed work 4 days before....all this meant was — I was ready!!!

Things Done Right:
Well rested, due to being sick the week before the race. Ate and drank plenty during the run.

Things Done Wrong:
I could have done some walk/running earlier in the race. I ran the first 50 miles without walking. I think this and fact the course was so flat took it toll on me.

Any Other Stuff:
There was a dead elk just off the race trail. Running thru the night, I knew there was something dead in that area, but it wasn’t until daylight, until I finally got to see what the stink was all about.
Mentally, it was tough to keep pushing thru the night. I told myself again, I am quitting Ultras...wish me luck at Leadville!

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Mt. Diablo Summer Trail Run - Mt. Diablo State Park, Clayton, CA - June 8, 2002

Bev & Eck Zimmermann report:
Distance: 25K (also included an 8K and 50K)
Goal: To get in a good hill workout and have fun
Results: Bev: 2:30:15; Eck: 2:33:45
Website:

General Summary:
We found this race on the internet which happened to coincide with a graduation we were attending in Northern CA the same weekend. It was a very small, low-key event put on by a group that sponsors several trail races throughout the year in the Bay Area. The loop course consisted of dirt roads and single-track trail. The start/finish was at the Mitchell Canyon trailhead at the north end of Mt. Diablo State Park (elevation approx. 550 feet), winding up to the top of Mt. Diablo (elevation 3849) and back down. The climbs were extremely steep in sections (including a cruel half-mile section during the descent), and the last two miles of downhill were rough, winding, and vertical!

Things Done Right:
One of us took all the right turns and didn’t get off course.

Things Done Wrong:
One of us DIDN’T take all the right turns, headed down a steep hill (the WRONG way), had to turn around when he realized his mistake and climb back UP the steep hill to find the course. Lost about 8 minutes and four places!

Any Other Stuff:
The course was marked fairly well (unless you ignore a big orange cone in front of you!); there was one aid station at the 5/10 mile marks which wasn’t real obvious so I missed it both times. The scenery was a combination of forests and grassy hillsides, with some nice views of the Bay Area. Overall it was a lot of fun; great to do something different in another part of the country.

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Steamboat 1/2 Marathon - Steamboat Springs, CO - 6/2/02

Lisa Patmor reports:
Distance: 13.1 mi
Goal: To enjoy the race
Results: 2:30

General Summary:
Overall, the race was great — I ran it last year for the first time and fell in love with Steamboat and the course is easy going and the views are beautiful. I plan to run it every year.

Things Done Right:
I was well hydrated and had a good night sleep the night before. I love this race, so I was able to relax and have a fun run — despite my disappointing time.

Things Done Wrong:
Too much trail running and not enough “continuous” road running. On Barr Trail, I’m one of the hiker/joggers, so I don’t run continuously, and I didn’t put in the road miles I needed to for this race. While the Ascent is my ultimate goal, I’ve been letting my road mileage slip lately and it caught up with me during the race (note the 2:30 time — I was just glad the 1st marathon runner didn’t pass me!). Another result of this is the pounding my legs took from not being used to the hard road surface, even though I ran on the dirt shoulder whenever there was one available.

Any Other Stuff:
The weather was almost perfect — I’d hoped it’d be a bit cooler.

The water stops are timed perfectly, always with Gatorade, water or Goo. Volunteers are awesome. Ice cold cloths just past the finish line were a nice addition this year.

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Squaw Peak 50 - Provo, Utah - 6/1/02

Rick Crawford reports:
Distance: 50m
Goal: to finish my first 50m
Results: 50miles : 14hrs5min

General Summary:
- ranked as the 3rd toughest 50m in the nation.
- beautiful and managable course to run on
- incredible scenery,with exception of BEAR 50 feet off
the trail at mile 32 (see me if you want details)
- The highest point of the race Windy Pass speaks for itself. got caught in the
worst rainstorm ever in history of the race with
high winds,hail, falling trees blocking the course.
you could hear the trees breaking and see how recent
they had fallen. the storm seem to last for about an
hour.
- the last part of the course before the 3.5mile road
to finish,DOWNHILL VERY VERY MUDDY and almost
impossible to run

Things Done Right:
All my “ducks” were in line

Things Done Wrong:

Any Other Stuff:
The bear did not come after me. THANK GOD!!! WHEW!

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Carol Sauceda reports:
Race: Squaw Peak 50 Mile
Location: Provo, Utah
Date: 6-01-2002
Distance: 50 miles
Goal: to Finish
Results: Completed 33 miles, AS8

General Summary: Ran well and felt good. Had tummy troubles in spite of everything I did so as NOT to have to deal with it...pit stops cost time. Got to AS8 @ 33 miles. A BIG powerful storm blew through the area with hurricane force winds (turns out this is the worst storm in the history of the race). The winds had blown down trees across the trail, blocking the course. Just as I was leaving AS8 to continue, the RD called and told the AS personnel not to let anyone else leave AS 8. So, they called me back and informed me that I could not leave. My race ended there. I was disturbed by what seemed to be an arbitrary decision at the time. I found out later about the trees and the severity of the storm, and understood that the RD made the call as there was a valid concern for runner’s safety on the course, and they had enough runner’s to worry about and track already. I went home disappointed, but did enjoy what I was able to do. It is a beautiful, challenging course. I’ll be back next year.

Things Done Right: I was incredibly well prepared. I had my drop bags at just the right aid stations, with exactly the right stuff in them. I had put extra ‘just in case’ type of items (gear and fuel)in my drop bags. As it turned out, I did need to access the extra items, as the AS’s were not exactly where they were supposed to be between miles 10.5 (AS #3) and 22.7 (AS #5). Also, I had taken with me in my pack, everything I needed in case there was a storm (common in the mountains). So when the storm blew through, I had my jacket, Gortex cap, windproof headband, extra gloves and warm dry clothes if needed + a rain poncho. So I was outfitted to continue the race, even when the storm blew in. Falling trees and other such hazards created by the storm were things simply OUT of MY CONTROL.

Things Done Wrong: Not sure exactly why I still had tummy troubles. I thought I had this all figured out. I lost at least ~1/2 hour due to necessary pit stops. I may need to go to a liquid diet, low volume and no fiber at all, for the 3 days before the race. I’ll try that next and see if it fixes the problem.

Any Other Stuff: This is a beautiful challenging kick butt course. This is one that I will probably add to my list of races that I just do every year.

A note on shoes — I ran in a new pair of Nikes that I got at the Colorado Running Co. I forget the name, but these are the shoes that are all black and have bright red shoelaces, with a waffle pattern on the sole of the shoe. I call them the “Michael Jordan” shoes. Anyway, the shoe performed well on this course. I had to tighten up the laces around my ankle for extra stability, but once I did that, my foot stopped wiggling around so much. The shoe was extremely comfortable and light weight. The waffle pattern provided adequate traction, such that I did have confidence running in this shoe, particularly on some tough downhill sections. This Nike shoe is on par with the North Face equivalent shoe that I have been running in. But Montrail’s Leona Divide still rules the trail in my experience, and humble opinion.

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Fort Collins Old Town Half-Marathon - Fort Collins, Colorado - Sunday, May 19, 2002

Daiva Cooper reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2:11
Results: 2:08

General Summary:
The course started in the Poudre Canyon for the first 3 miles then proceeded down a back highway eventually ending in downtown Fort Collins. The canyon part of the run was beautiful. However, the scenery diminished greatly once we left the canyon. The course was basically flat with a few minor hills along the way.

Things Done Right:
1. Stayed well-hydrated and had enough energy during the race
2. Only walked one time, to eat a power gel and take off my long sleeve shirt
3. Beat my goal time by 3 minutes

Things Done Wrong:
1. Needed a better night’s sleep; would have been better off leaving Springs at 3 am then sleeping on a friend’s couch the night before
2. Need to train for road races on the road and trail races on the trail. I have been doing mainly trail runs, so the road really gave my knees and hips a beating.

Any Other Stuff:
Discovered that I prefer either 1) Trail races or 2) Road races only if they are in a spectacular scenic location like GOG or up in the mountains

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Leeds Marathon - Leeds, England - May 12, 2002

Eryn Lonnquist reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 5:00:00
Results: 5:00:05

General Summary:
When they tell you to ‘go out slow,’ boy do I take that to heart. I tried Jeff Galloway’s technique of run 5 minutes, walk 1 since this was my first marathon. Worked pretty well until I realized it was making me way to slow. Slow enough so that when I got to the second loop of the race, I was in last place with a 13 mile time of 2:40. Ouch, I know I can do better than that.... picked up the pace for the next 13 miles, so that my second lap was only 2:20. Unfortunately since they reduced the number of race marshals present at about three hours, I got lost about mile 21. Eventually found my way back, but I might have lost a half mile in my wanderings, oh well. So I don’t know how accurate my time is for a full 26.2 miles, but I’m sure it’s within 5 minutes, that was my pace towards the last 10 miles. On the brighter side, since I was in last place from about 6/7 miles on, no one passed me at all the last 20ish miles of the race. I finally did pass someone at mile 16 and started catching people from then on.

Things Done Right:
Brought granola bars with- no food was available on the course. Drank water the two days before like there would be no tomorrow. Since I was so conservative the first half, I had a ton of energy the second half - never hit any wall, so I probably should’ve gone faster. Checked out the start/finish area the night before so I knew what to expect. During the race drank a glass of water and a glass of their lemonade-energy drink at every station, that seemed to work okay in my stomach.

Things Done Wrong:
I have no idea why I was so slow the first half of the race. I’ll really have to start adding to my speedwork in order to prevent that from happening again. But now that I’ve done a marathon, I have a little more of an idea about what to expect and how to pace myself. I also didn’t put enough sunscreen on... the word ‘lobster’ comes to mind. Will have to bring that with in the future to re-apply half way through, the pain isn’t worth the couple of seconds lost by stopping to put it on. Getting lost at the end wasn’t helpful to my frame of mind- next time I’ll pay more attention to the course on the first loop to hopefully prevent that from happening again, regardless of race marshals. Wrote my splits on my arm, which has worked in the past but this time disappeared after some sunscreen and sweat. I’ll bring a piece of paper next time, or write them on my number. I also wore my thinnest running socks... bad idea. After five hours in them, it wasn’t fun. I should’ve gone with thick thorlos, especially since the course was all on pavement.

Any Other Stuff:
No food was out at any aid station or at the end! That was certainly a bummer. Course was moderately hilly- tame compared to CO standards, but decent compared to England standards. They had a lane blocked off for the runners where a sidewalk wasn’t available, that was nice. All of the volunteers were quite helpful, and the kids giving out water kept asking if you wanted it thrown at you! A good sized race, 4500 people total, but hardly any of them were doing the marathon, most were doing the half-marathon or relay, so the course was pretty bare the second lap (especially since I was last for a while...hmmmmmm).

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City of Pittsburgh Marathon - Pittsburgh, PA - May 5, 2002

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: marathon/26.2
Goal: sub-2:48
Results: 2:54:08
Website: http://www.upmc.edu/pghmarathon

General Summary:
11th overall open female, 6th overall American female
This was a very good event. Despite not reaching my goal of a sub-2:48, this was the fastest time I’ve run in over two years. The first half of the course was rolling, with a steady climb from miles 10-12. The second half of the course was flat and then downhill. My strategy was to be relaxed and comfortable the first half, then pick it up the second half. Well, I felt great until mile 19...I ended up losing almost three minutes in the last three miles. Overall, I was happy with my race and would definitely go back. If some Incliners are interested in running a road marathon next spring, you should consider Pittsburgh. It’s well-run and the course is suited for hill runners.

Things Done Right:
1. Got enough rest prior to race day.
2. Paced myself conservatively for the first half and stayed focused on my pace.
3. Ate enough prior to the race and drank at every aid station.
4. Stayed relaxed throughout the entire race. When I got tired, I just thought about leg turnover and target time.
5. Actually took mile splits with my watch! This is the first marathon I used my watch to store miles. This gave me really accurate info and a progression of the race after I was reviewing my weak and strong points of my run.

Things Done Wrong:
1. Need to work on last 10k of my marathon, especially the last three miles. My long training runs on the road would typically be 19-miles...go figure, that’s where I started to drop-off the pace in the race!

Any Other Stuff:
EXPO: 7/10 The usual mix of “good” buys and information booths.
COURSE: 9/10 Rolling, challenging course.
AID STATIONS: 8/10 Almost every mile
SPECTATORS: 6/10 Not jamming the streets, but definitely enough support along the course
START/FINISH: Cool! The start and finish were at Heinz Field, the new 70,000 seat Pittsburgh Steelers stadium. The finish was in the stadium, with the Jumbotron showing runners entering the field and finishing...very cool!

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Law Day 15k - Santa Barbara, CA - May 4, 2002

Brian Eldridge reports:
Distance: 15k
Goal: 56:00; 6 min/mile avg
Results: 55:57
Website: http://www.sbrunning.org

General Summary:
I’ve been preparing to run the San Diego marathon on June 2nd so I was using this race as tune up. The main things I was trying to get down was proper pacing and running my own race.

The race was held along the beachfront of Santa Barbara. Couldn’t have been a more beautiful place to run, however, the course wasn’t so great. It started on a narrow sidewalk where after about a mile it switched to the road for a mile or so then it turned around came back up the road then it went back to the sidewalk then to the bike path then through a parking lot then to a sidewalk then road again and then...nevermind. It was slightly confusing to say the least. Would have been much better if it stayed on the road the whole time.

The race itself went very well for me. Actually, it was probably the best race I’ve had since I started running. The course was mainly flat with one long uphill section towards the middle of the course. I had planned on running slightly faster than my goal pace on the flatter sections and the downhills to make up for the slow mile or so uphill. Well this plan actually worked for me. I went through the first three miles right about 5:50 per mile pace and even though I got passed by a few people I stuck to my plan. I ran mile 4 (start of hill) at 6:00 and then mile 5 (hill) at 6:20. Then once through the turn around and on the downhill I was back down to the 5:50’s. I held this pace to the finish to finish with a time of 55:57. I felt strong and comfortable the whole way and this time I was the one passing people in the final miles rather then my usual go out to fast and die. I guess I’m learning. My time was good enough for 13th overall and 2nd in my age group.

Things Done Right:
Did a good warmup. Something I hadn’t done before previous races.

Checked the course before hand and came up with a pacing plan.

Stuck to my plan and ran my own race. Previous races I would just try to stay with faster runners until I blew up and then I would try to hang on to the finish. Not a good thing to do.

Things Done Wrong:
Can’t think of anything.

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Big Sur International Marathon - Carmel by the Sea, CA - April 28, 2002

David Reily reports:
Distance: 26.2M
Goal: 3:45
Results: 3:40:12
Website: http://www.bsim.org

General Summary:
This was the “17th Presentation” of the Big Sur Marathon. They also have a 5-person marathon relay, a 5K, and several walking venues. The race is billed as the best marathon in North America and it’s hard to disagree! The fabulous course, atmosphere, and race organization really lived up to its reputation.
My Goal: 3:45 and to take lots of photos along the way.
My Results: 3:40:12, with lots of photos! Placed #41 out of 234 in my age division.

Things Done Right:
> Trained in Colorado Springs including some of Galloway’s walk/run technique.
> Hydrated well and had four GUs along the way.
> Took advantage of all the downhills!
> Cooperative weather

Things Done Wrong:
> Got a little too warm, but used their cold, wet sponges at the aid stations.

Any Other Stuff:
ORGANIZATION — excellent. Well staffed, motivated, and thankful you ran their race. Plenty of porta potties and buses for the early morning drive out to the start line. They even include a critique form to mail back to them.

EXPO/PASTA DINNER — above average. Lots of booths, displays, souvenirs and speaker presentations.

COURSE — point to point asphalt road from Big Sur north to Carmel (south side of Monterey) along California Route #1. Course starts in a forest with some redwoods, passes fields of cows and a lighthouse, climbs Hurricane point (500’ in 2 miles), crosses many bridges, notably the famous “Bixby Bridge,” rolls along over some mild hills, and finishes in the Monterey suburbs. Aid stations averaged every 1.5-2 miles, well-staffed with water, Gatorade, GU/Gel, sponges, and Vaseline. Mile markers were made in the shape of cellos/violins. Volunteers called out your times at the markers (splits, average pace, expected finish time). The course had many jazz/brass bands, a harpist, a grand piano, bagpipers, and Japanese drummers. Also, there were frequent humorous signs on the side of the road
such as “Anaerobic Point” and “De Composer” — a skeleton on the ground in a conductor’s outfit.

GOODIES — unique finisher medal (made of some pottery material with a leather cord) and a cool long sleeve black cotton t-shirt. Also had coupons for free newspapers the next day for all the race coverage. Local news had about 15 minutes of coverage that night.

RECOMMENDATION:
Not the easiest way to qualify for Boston. But if you run the roads, this is a “must do.”

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Cafe to Cafe 100 - Arvada, CO - April 27-28, 2002

Stephanie Jenkins reports:
Distance: 101.2 miles
Goal: finish and have fun
Results: finished as a group
Website: http://ultrawalk.com

General Summary:
A 100 mile (101.2 actual) ultrawalk that started with a 4.7 mph pace and ended with an overall average of 4.07 mph. At mile 80 we were only 8 minutes behind schedule which we made up for by shortening one of the scheduled stops. We had made a decision to finish as a group so we slowed over the last 21.2. Much of the course was over city trails (concrete) and it took it’s toll on my hips. Feet weren’t any worse than everyone else’s. I had plenty of leg strength, in large part, I believe, to IC runs. Temps ranged from lows in the 30’s to high 70’s. There were Aid Stations about everyone 2-3 hours so prep before departing was important since access by my “crew” (Joel) was limited on the course.

Things Done Right:
POSITIVE ATTITUDE and NOT GIVING UP Changed eating habits a year ago to high carb, low fat primarily vegetarian diet, proper hydration, having a race day strategy, and support crew. Training on hills

Things Done Wrong:
Changed eating pattern around mile 50. Ate food I don’t usually eat and paid for it immediately and the next 3 hrs with nausea and vomiting... Forgot some tips 1. what you do in the beginning of the race is what you should do throughout 2. don’t eat something new during the race not training at all for terrain race was held on (city concrete trail

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Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 101.2 miles
Goal: 30 miles
Results: 13+
Website: http://wsmr.army.mil

General Summary:
This is as much a race crew report as it is a run report since I did both. I went with the intention of being Steph’s crew and planned on doing an out-and-back with the group and the night loop. Since Steph was the only person with a crew and I started providing foot care and crew service early in the race I wasn’t able to do what I intended. I was able to do the night loop, started at 11:15 pm and went until 2:30 am. Almost all concrete trails. Started out relatively warm but temps dipped sharply when the cloud cover left.

Things Done Right:
Took a good mix of medical supplies and was able to provide much needed, and greatly appreciated, assistance to all the race members. This group was the most thankful group I’ve ever supported, they took nothing for granted.

As a member of the race group I didn’t overdress at the start of my leg so I was stuck carrying a lot at the end (which I tend to do).

Things Done Wrong:
Now I know that I could have carried what I needed to continue my crew duties (primary function). Next time I will.

Any Other Stuff:
This is a GREAT first time 100 miler. It is very low key, competition between the racers is really non-existent. The goal of the race is to finish, period. The group dynamics reflected the fact that half the group were eco-challenge type race veterans and all those that did finish crossed together.

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106th Boston Marathon - Boston, MA - April 15, 2002

Gordon Barnett reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: To Run Boston
Results: Chip Time (Net): 3:38:36
Website: http://bostonmarathon.org

General Summary:
Start: Hopkinton, cool (high 40’s) with low clouds, mist in the air.
Finish: Boston (predicted 80’s) Actual: 75
Course Elevation: 500’ mile 1, 0’ mile 26.2

Sunday April 14th standing on Boylston Street, watching the scaffolding being constructed for the finish line, shivers racing up at down my spine. Looking at the media crews setting up and testing their equipment, it was unbelievable that in a little more than 24 hours I would (hopefully) be running past this point as I finish my first Boston Marathon. My wife Carole (best support crew - ever) and I are fortunate to be in the company of Harold and Andrea Hatch, Sarah Hatch-Wright’s father and mother (Fred’s in-laws.) Harold and Andrea were very gracious, offering to have us crash at their Charles Town walk-up. Harold coaches the M.I.T. girls track team, and Andrea just happens to be the only woman with a streak of 25 “official” Boston Marathons. (She actually has 26 - but her first was not recognized.) Who better to show us Boston, provide a background (and valuable advice) to the 26.2 miles I had previously only dreamt about running? The temperature Sunday was in the 80’s with more o f the same predicted for the next day, Patriot’s Day and the 106th Boston Marathon.

Spent a surprisingly restful night before an early wakeup call to get ready to hop the “T” to the staging area where the yellow school buses were lined up to take some 17,000 participants to the Athlete’s Village in Hopkinton. The morning was cloudy and cool with a light drizzle - tapering from a fairly heavy rain overnight, as Andrea and I made our way to the subway station. Sitting on the bus as we made our way out to Hopkinton, the rain subsided and we learned that the forecast had changed! Cool with fog and showers at the start then clearing in the afternoon - but with a high still in the 80’s for the finish.

Eventually arriving at the drop off area, the bus made it without the driver being bribed to pull over for an unscheduled pit stop. Note:1 Be prepared to be on a bus (with no restroom) for close to 1.5 hours. We walked about 1/2 mile through sleepy Hopkinton streets before entering the secured area that would be a temporary city of tents, and tarps for 17,000+ fashioning the latest in plastic trash bag apparel, “who are you wearing - Glad?” Note: 2 Bring warm-up clothes, shoes and socks that you aren’t running in, plenty of hydration/nutrition, and even more bags or the Boston Globe to sit or lie on, while you read the latest race day coverage. Organizers have a great set-up for sweat checks, dropping your bag with bib number on sequentially numbered buses for pick up at the finish line. Bagels, coffee and water are plentiful, but served in little paper cups. The information tent has Vaseline, and felt markers to write your name or message somewhere on your body and will be called out from the crowds lining both sides of the 26.2 miles.

From the main stage came speeches, music and introductions. Old John E. Kelley was introduced to the masses. This guy is 94, no longer competes in the marathon but still looks like he could run a sub 4 hour! Note 3: The shortest lineups for the porta-potties are at the village entrance by the two huge water tanks. I notice some people coming out of the “facilities” only to go right back into line. Note 4: This is a good idea!

Count down commences. At 11:00 with 1 hour to go, people start their pre-race routines and begin making their way back through the streets to the starting corrals. This time the streets are now awake with locals some already handing out fruit and water. One house has a white bed sheet stretched out on a table, people gather around to sign their names. On the porch are sheets with signatures from past years fluttering in the breeze. At the start line. Corrals hold 1000 runners that are pre-designated according to your qualifying time, and correspond to your bib number. The blue and yellow banners that hang from street lights summed it up. “If there is such a thing as hallowed ground to a runner - you’re standing on it.” Introductions from the starting line. Last year’s winners, Lee Bong Ju from Korea, and Catherine Ndereba from Kenya take their places. The gun (I think it was a gun) sounds! The Stones “Start Me Up” blares over the speakers... and everyone in my corral stands still . It takes just over 5 minutes of starting and stopping before reaching the start line, chirping loudly as thousands of computerized timing chips pass over.

Official Time: 3:43:28
Chip Time (Net): 3:38:36
Overall: 6882
Division: 2115

Winning Times:
Rogers Rop (Kenya) 2:09:02
Margaret Okayo (Kenya) 2:20:43 (COURSE RECORD)

Things Done Right:
Kept the time on my feet Sunday at the Expo and hiking through Charlestown and the Old North End to a minimum.

Walked the last mile to the finish line the day before.

Went prepared to the Athlete’s Village (4.5 - 5 hours prior to the start including bus ride).

Didn’t go out too fast through the first four miles - downhill.

Powered through the up hills, easy on the downs.

2 cups: 1 H20, 1 Gatorade at each aid station (until mile 24).
Enjoyed the experience!

Sprinted the finish, smiled “breaking the tape.”

High-5’d as many little kids along the way as possible.

Trained at a sustained marathon pace - distance, flat on pavement.

Twice weekly track speed workouts.

Tapered well.

Things Done Wrong:
Held back until mile 16 — waiting for the Newton Hills and the infamous “Heartbreak Hill".

Ran too easy on the down hills.

Ran through the “Wellesley Girls” (see report).

Any Other Stuff:
0 - 10 Miles: Hopkinton to Natick
Elevation drops from 462 to 177 feet.
The first mile-and-a-half drops quite sharply. I listened to the sound advice I had received and held back on the opening down hill. Huge crowds lined both sides of Route 135, outstretched hands of kids of all ages looking for a high-5’s from passing runners. Water then Gatorade stations at every mile. They are conveniently staggered on both sides of the road, the station on the right appears first followed by the left side station several hundred yards up. This continues through the rest of the course. If you’re on one side, DON’T try and navigate the pack to reach the other side, if you aren’t trampled — you’ll burn too much energy getting across. The water stations further into the course become slightly dangerous with discarded cups, orange and banana peels. After the first four miles, the course becomes undulating terrain with good footing on asphalt.

10 - 13 Miles: Natick to Wellesley
Elevation drops from 177 feet to 137 feet.
This section includes a few mild hills — nothing too challenging. The road becomes slanted — I worked my way over to the center line — otherwise you’ll be running on an angle. Approaching the half-way mark you begin to hear a hum building in the air.

13 - 16 Miles: Wellesley to Lower Newton Falls
Elevation drops from 137 to 49 feet.
The hum grows to a loud roar, whistles, screams and the clanging of pots and pans. You’ve reached mile 13.2, the half-way point which is no doubt the loudest point of the course. Welcome to the Girl’s College at Wellesley. College girls hang over the barricades, holding signs, “KISS ME I’m From Texas,” KISS ME I’m from California,” one sign read, “I Don’t Care Where the Hell You’re From… KISS ME! Note 5: It is at this point that Steve Sargeant and Bill Ransom, will change their plans from running 26.2 - and call it day at a 1/2 marathon! Leaving the girls behind, you come to Lower Newton Falls. Other than the opening downhill, the drop here is the longest and steepest on the course. The decline lasts for about a mile and you can destroy your quads going too hard.

16 - 22 Miles: Lower Newton Falls to Cleveland Circle
Elevation Rises from 49 feet to 236 feet then drops to 147 feet.
I’ve heard this part of course referred to as “Killer Chain,” which is fitting because of the series of up hills (and down) culminating with Heartbreak. I powered through the inclines, passing a number of runners, and relaxed on the declines. I didn’t find Heartbreak too challenging, I did find the sharp decline that runs past Boston College much more punishing! In hind-sight, I probably should have pushed the downhills more.

22 - 26.2 Miles: Cleveland Circle to the Finish
Elevation drops from 147 feet to 20 feet (or less).
This section starts a gradual downhill. The crowds become even larger as you get closer to the finish. There are areas where people pinch into the course causing the road to narrow. This was the first marathon in which I’ve run that you never seem to break free of the pack… you are always running in a crowd. Note 6: I found out later that a 28 year old woman collapsed in this section, and later died in hospital. The course becomes flat, with a slight incline on Hereford Street. The most amazing sight comes into view as you turn the corner from Hereford on to Boylston Street... the finish line! I don’t remember this last 1/2 mile. I felt almost numb, even the crowd roar seemed to be on mute. I think I was smiling as I crossed the finish. I felt awesome, a little tightness in my quads, but nothing serious. I walked through the finishing area returning my timing chip, received my medal, and retrieved my sweat check from the numbered bus before meeting Carole (best support — crew ever) and Harold a t the designated “family meeting site".

Anyone wanting the ultimate marathon experience must run Boston! I have never witnessed anything like this before, from the Expo through the finish at the John Hancock Tower. This is without a doubt one of the most well organized marathon events in existence. I later heard that this Boston was the 3rd largest in it’s long and illustrious history.

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Craig Hess reports:
Boston Marathon Trip Report

Late report but I’m happy to report I’m now 3 for 3 on sub-par performances
at Boston. Nonetheless I was excited to be there again and despite the performance, it was a great event. The ankle/knee seemed to hold out (that was my big worry) but the lack of training in order to heal the joints just didn’t cut it. I ran some bad splits adding 20 minutes to the second half. Decided to go for 3:20 with lame training and (naturally) faded badly to a 3:39. This botched Boston means I’ll be looking for a fall marathon in order to get back to Boston next year. My sister and brother-in-law played host once again and now that they bought a house there, I feel obliged to run Boston again (and again). One year I actually plan to arrive in Boston healthy.

All I could do was just watch as several thousand coasted by me in the last few miles. I also watched (once again) as a friend passed me just before mile 25 on her way to a PR. (Congrats K.O.!) This marathon was special for me in that I ran it for Tom Lopez who pulled through BRAIN surgery on race day down in Tampa, Florida. (Tom...there were times I wondered if you were even qualified for that procedure but I am sure glad you’re still around!) As an aside... Tom, an avid runner, would like to start a foundation to raise funds to help find a cure for brain cancer. He’s already beaten the odds by surviving several surgeries to date and has a fantastic attitude about the whole experience. If there’s anyone with ideas on how to go about such an endeavor, please contact me. His foundation will of course include a fund-raiser run.

Last year my 12th and final marathon of 2001 was supposed to have been Honolulu but the deployment to Turkey messed that up. Apparently Allah knew what he was doing. I’ll now have ample opportunity, as I’ll be transferring to another hardship tour, Hawaii, in September. Bracing myself for the Leadville 100 in August. So far training is pretty comfortable...I haven’t started. All for now. Course info below.

Boston Marathon — 15 Apr 02
Entry Fee — $75
Link — http://www.bostonmarathon.org
Course — A net 450 foot drop, but of course you have over 200 feet gain along the way, mostly in the Newton neighborhood. Most of the route is very scenic.
Expo - Great expo but it definitely pays to go on Saturday vice Sunday. They tend to run out of things very quickly. The “official” race gear will put your bank account in the red.
Goodie Bag - Getting skimpy for $75.
Medal — Standard Boston Medal with the year change.
T-Shirt — Great long sleeve T.
Super Neat Hi Tech Thing — Your running chip was tied to the Internet again. You could track the event online (updates every 5K) and register up to 6 email and wireless friends to receive text message updates. System must have been overloaded however as the email piece didn’t work late in the game.
Crowds - Last year it was “TOUGH to beat!!” Now it may be “IMPOSSIBLE TO BEAT!!” They were supposedly 1.5 million spectators along the route. Great volunteers!
Start temp - After a weather forecast of 75 degrees, a freakish (but very well-timed) cool front moved in and we had decent start temps at noon. It definitely warmed up the last 10 miles. Close to mid-70’s.
Overall impression - Just something you’ve got to do. Repeatedly.

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Bataan Memorial Death March - White Sands, NM - April 14, 2002

Joel and Stephanie Jenkins report:
Distance: 26.2
Goal: Anything less than 6:00
Results: Less than 6:00, yea!! New PR by nearly 30 minutes for this run
Website: http://wsmr.army.mil

General Summary:
Check the website and it will tell you that at 0600 it was 60 degrees. Yeah, except that they fail to mention that by 8:30 it was climbing past 80 and by the time we finished it was 92!
Started out very strong, lots of oxygen at 4500 feet. 8-9 minute miles for the first 10 or so. That includes the 5 mile climb out of the desert and into the “hills.” Circled the mountain, back to the asphalt, back into the desert for the 1-1/2 miles of ankle deep sand (mile 20). When others go before you in the snow, it’s packed when you get there, in the case of this sand however, it gets really loose. Back onto trail down the stretch where you can see for over a mile. Unlike your mirror, things are NOT closer than they appear in the desert. Finished well, the best part being able to walk after the race, unlike many others.

Things Done Right:
Great pre-race vegetarian pasta meal (recipe available for anyone interested)
Remembered my shoes this time!!! (Joel)
We will NEVER, EVER bitch about the snow and ice on Barr or UPT again. We were physically ready for the race except for the heat.

Things Done Wrong:
Should have trained a little more on asphalt

Any Other Stuff:
(From the website) The Bataan Memorial Death March is a challenging 26.2-mile march through the high desert terrain of White Sands Missile Range, N.M. The 26.2 mile memorial march route starts on the White Sands main post, crosses hilly desert terrain, circles a small mountain and returns to the main post through sandy desert trails and washes. The elevation ranges from about 4,100 to 5,300 feet. This memorial march is conducted in honor of the heroic service members who defended the Philippine Islands during World War II, sacrificing their freedom, health and, in many cases, their very lives.

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Golden Gate Marathon - San Francisco, CA - April 6, 2002

Elizabeth Ahola reports:

General Summary:
Golden Gate Marathon, 1/2 Marathon and 7M (N. side of bridge in park) 9 A.M. start time.

The marathon is double the 1/2 marathon loop. The 7M roughly runs the first and last quarter of the loop.

There are water stations at mile 4, 7, and 10. At the start/finish line you will find food, water, soda pop, Gatorade and t-shirts. The t-shirt design is the same for all distances and does not have the year on it. Rather generic.

This was a very relaxed race managed by 5 people from EnviroSports. It felt like a Sunday run with the Incline, except you had to pay for the scenery. The start consisted of the race manager with 3 stop watches yelling ‘GO’ at 10 minute intervals. The marathon group started first. 10 minutes later the 1/2 marathon group and the largest with about 200 people started followed by the 7M group. There were 10 people running the marathon.

The course is on park grounds and you share the trail/road with other hikers, bikers, horses, cars, and runners. Luckily the course is well marked with orange tape so that you don’t have to worry about the person in front of you going the wrong way. Or, being in the race.

The course starts with a 900ft. ascent run on an old road/trail. The last 50 yards or so of the hill is climbed on narrow steps with hand rails. At the top, you follow a ridge that drops you into the Tennessee Valley and literally into a riding stable. Pass the stalls, pass the barns and pass the arenas, you will find the first water station. Don’t be alarmed if you run into upset riders trying to control their horses on the trail as you run by and spook them. They get even with the manure and the stench on the trail and at the riding stable.

The next section is run on a rather straight boring dirt fire road with an 1100 foot ascent. This is where bikers go zipping by. Below you can see homes, boats, and yacht clubs to pass the time. At the top you enter the woods. It is a really ‘COOL’ 1/3 mile section in a dense wooded area. Here, the trail is covered in moist husks of some sort, the trees are breathtaking, and the smell is sweet. At the end is the 7M water station.

From the 7M to the 10M water station, the race becomes a cross-country event. You drop into Rodeo Valley via an old over grown dirt road that goes through marsh areas. At the bottom you find hikers and dogs before you cross the road to the 10M water station and begin the 3rd and final ascent. As you peak on this ascent you encounter cars and bikers zipping by. You quickly make your way through the picnic grounds and onto a trail where you can see the finish line in a distance. Caution - the trail is really a steep wash out into the ocean. Before water comes sand and beach. You run the last 200 yards on the soft sinking sand, dodge the flying fish hooks, cross a small water inlet, climb up onto the road, and run to the picnic tables to finish.

The race has absolutely wonderful views of San Francisco, the ocean, and wild flowers. The marathon would be fun if the 2nd loop was run in the opposite direction. This would give you optimal viewing.

I would run this race again if I was in the area, but I wouldn’t make a special trip to it.

Things Done Right:
Took it easy and enjoyed myself. Didn’t kill myself so that now I can get back to COS and concentrate on what really matters. The PPM.

Things Done Wrong:
I ran the race. I became very ill 2 weeks before and woke up the morning of the race still very fatigued and having a sore throat. I couldn’t cancel my hotel reservations, so I might as well run. 1/2 way up the first ascent and I’m already hurting. My legs became heavy around 3M and made hill climbing hard. I took it down a notch on the 1st ascent but had to go a few more along the way if I wanted to finish.

Surprised:
I finished in 2hrs 6minutes and was not sore, stiff or drained like I normally am from the Sunday Incline runs. It’d be nice to run a race when you’re not sick the week before.

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Alferd Packer Trail Challenge - Littleton, CO - March 10, 2002

Joel Jenkins reports:
Distance: 13.1 miles
Goal: 2:30
Results: 2:58
Website: http://www.coachweber.com

General Summary:
This was my first trail run that had water crossings, mud, ice, etc. It was a lot of fun despite the following description:

Start: immediately climbed a hill that rivals UPT for steepness but certainly not length. Off to a good start. Basic cross country and trail running with ankle-busting gopher holes, a hill or two and ‘punctuated’ by some green sword cactus.

Miles 1.2 through 2.50: Easy, easy cruising on flat track.

Mile 2.5: Crossed the Platte River. The water was nearly waist high, just enough water to make sure you knew you were in some really cold mountain snow run off.

Miles 2.5 through 5.0: Up and down some hills made from that same red pea gravel/dirt mixture on UPT that gets in your shoes and slides with every step. Some places were so steep that you could reach straight out with your hand and touch the hill in front of you.

Miles 5 and 6: easy run through the Chatfield State Park.

Miles 6 and 7: Roots, stream crossings, beaver spikes, thicket, mud and bush-whacking. Muck so thick it would take your shoes off. Just about the time the mud came off the bottom of your shoes there was another section!

Miles 7 through 11.5: horse trail heading back towards the Platte. This is when I started to REALLY regret my choice of footwear. More to follow on that!

Mile 11.5 to the end: Started with the second crossing of the Platte. I foolishly thought this comment in the race information meant that there were only 2 water crossings. This is true of the Platte, however, there are a LOT of little creeks and streams, and ditches, and wet fields, and....well, you get the idea. After the Platte, it was an easy run to the finish.

Things Done Right:
Running with the IC.
Polyester and lycra are much better than cotton

Things Done Wrong:
Rule #1. When you pack the night before make sure that you actually BRING your running shoes with you, don’t leave them under the chair that had your Camelback sitting on it!!!!!! It makes you have to run in the 2 year old Salomon Trail shoes with about a 1,000 miles on them that you brought because “they will be comfortable for after the race.”

Trying a new hydration supplement for the first time. For me, water is a better liquid in the Camelback than any supplement, regardless of the claims they make.


Carol Sauceda reports:
Distance: 26.2 Miles
Goal: 39.3 Miles (the Ultra option)
Results: 26.2 Miles, 6 hours, 10 minutes
Website: http://coachweber.com

General Summary:
I signed up for the ultra, 39.3 miles (3 loops of 13.1 miles each). The time limit was 9 hours. I completed the first 2 loops in 6:10. The race director had extended the finish time by 1/2 hour. However, I was certain it would take me more than 3:15(which was all the time I had left at that point), to complete a 3rd loop, so I decided to take the ‘survivor’ medal for completing the marathon distance.

Things Done Right:
I have really thought this through, and I am feeling very good about how I prepared for and ran this event:
1. Trained well, including several runs with the Incline Club at 20+ miles;
2. I was well rested before, and well fueled, and hydrated before and during the run. I weighed the same Monday morning as I did before the race on Sunday morning;
3. I paced myself well, working hard, but at a sustainable level of effort;
4. No problems with the tummy, or nausea, or muscles, etc;
5. Quick transition (including a trip to the potty) of 5 minutes; and finally
6. Dressed well, including gaiters, which kept most of the rocks out of my shoes, and helped keep the lower legs warm (lots of ice water crossings).

Things Done Wrong:
Well, you most always have room for improvement:
1. Due to the difficulty of the course, I was burning up calories faster than I was replacing them. I figured this out and adjusted in time (ate more food), so I did not have a serious energy dip; and
2. Forgot to take extra calcium and vit C at the transition...oh well.

Any Other Stuff:
This was a NEW course, with the same time limit of 9 hours. Based on how I ran the old course, how I ran this new course, and relative to how I placed compared to other runners in the field, it is my opinion that this course should have a 10 hour time limit...not 9. The new course is more difficult than the old course, in that there is just more of the classic Alferd Packer ‘fun’: starting with an open cross-country climb up a steep cactus covered, gopher hole laden hill; crossing through the Platted River, after flying down the steep embankment; passage through face-smacking willows; “ouch” I didn’t see those low hanging tree limbs; through the open forest by carefully negotiating fallen logs, tree branches, ice and muck; more mud, muck, and ice water crossings; up and down a whole bunch (I quit counting) very steep sandy hills (cactus and ice included) and embankments; and then there was the extended swamp section which included mud, muck, more fallen logs and tree branches and will ows, and many, many icy stream and various water containing crossings (ice flows included). I was thankful that my feet actually came back up out of the muck with my shoes still on, but I had to run for another ~1/2 hour before I actually got some feeling back in my feet; another crossing of the Platte; and one last water crossing with a slippery = could not be climbed without sliding back into the water embankment on the other side. All together, I LOVED this new course, and it deserves an extended time limit.


Rick Crawford reports:
Distance: 39.3 (3 -13.1 mile laps)
Results: 6:01 only able to finish 26.2miles
Website: http://coachweber.com

General Summary:
TOUGHEST RACE I have been involved in and not finished the entire distance. Harder than the Pikes Peak Marathon in my opinion. Multiple H20 crossings, swamp, mud, ice, steep inclines/declines, sand, roots, yucca, cactus, bushwhacking energy zapped during lap 2

Things Done Right:
-Training
-Paced myself very well during lap 1 and ran entire first lap
-Hydration
-Maple syrup for gel

Things Done Wrong:
Maybe maple syrup gave me too much iron in my system

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Spring Runoff - Pueblo - March 3, 2002

Eric Billmeyer reports:
Distance: 10 miles
Results: 2nd overall
Website: http://www.socorunners.org/scrrs231.htm

General Summary:
Against the advice of myself, friends, family, and Matt I decided to run the Pueblo Spring Runoff. I’ve been having troubles with my right calf(slight strain) for a couple weeks now. But, as I had already paid my entry fee and my girlfriend Terri was going to race her first 10k(also part of the race) I just wanted to be there . So off I went with the notion that if I felt any pain I would just pull out of the race and that would be that. Well just at the end of my warm-up I felt it tighten up and I gimped back to the car. I thought that was it. As I stood around in the balmy(not!) weather watching all the racers line up, I couldn’t take it. My hard-headed competitive side took over and there I was going off with the others as the race began. So now I’m thinking, well we’ll just take this mile by mile and see how it goes. The Spring Runoff is actually three races, a 5k, 10k, and 10 miler ,all starting at the same time, with each distance either turning around or branching off at different p arts of the race. So I went through the first mile in 5:50, ignoring the slight pain in my right calf by trying to ran as flat footed as possible. I was about the eighth runner at that point but had no idea who was in what race. So mile 2,3,and 4 passed and my leg wasn’t getting any worse(wasn’t getting any better either)so I kept on going. By this time the 5k had turned around and the 10k branched off. I was now in third place in the 10 mile about 15 seconds off second and 25 or so off first. The 10 mile did a u-turn at about 5.75 and I got to see my competition face to face. Matt Mosman was in the lead and Paul Koch was in second now about 5 seconds ahead. I caught Paul at about mile 7 and could see Matt(still maintaining his 25 second lead). I tried to pickup the pace but I couldn’t push off my right foot. The best I could do was maintain my pace which at this point had been pretty steady. All my miles were coming in right around 5:50. And that’s the way it ended. Matt won in 58:22 and I came in second at 58:51, an average of 5:53 per mile. After the race I could barely walk on my calf and I thought about how stupid it was to have raced. Now a couple of days later I can say fortunately I didn’t hurt myself any worse, but I definitely could have. Ego is no excuse for stupidity. Terri had no such problems and finished her first 10k in 55:18 and even got a medal for finishing second in her age group!

Things Done Right:
Ran an even paced race throughout

Things Done Wrong:
Raced on an injury

Any Other Stuff:
Race results at the end were all messed up, wrong times, wrong places. If you ran the race and want your correct finish time and place, go to the Southern Colorado Runners website under results.

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Old Pueblo 50 mile run - Tucson, Arizona - March 2, 2002

Gordon Neal reports:
Weather: Cool, sunny, and windy at times
Winning time: 7:03
My time: 10:29
Finish place: 20/52 finishers

This course is a large loop through the Santa Rita mountains south of Tucson. It is run on rough jeep roads and single track trail with no real sustained uphills but also very little flat terrain. It is a tougher coarse than it appears on the map, mostly because of the poor footing over much of the coarse. It seemed to be a universal consensus that this is a beautiful coarse and a well conducted race. The field doubled this year and the race director was forced to turn away runners when he reached the 60 runner limit that was on his forest service permit.

This year the race was very different than last year, as the field was much larger and faster. Last years winner finished tenth overall in a faster time than she ran last year. I finished faster than last year, not because I ran faster, but because I stayed on the coarse. With my altitude and cold weather training I should have had a significant advantage, but I ran out of steam about midway through the run. This was the first 50 mile run I ran 18 years ago. I have run this race seven times and been race director twice so it is an old favorite of mine and I will be returning in the future.

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Mountain to Fountain - Fountain Hills, AZ - February 23, 2002

Jonathan Cavner reports:
Distance: 15K
Goal: Run an easy race
Results: 52:46
Website: http://www.3disciplines.com

General Summary:
I was working in Phoenix last week and stayed the weekend. The only race was the Mountain to Fountain 15K near Fountain Hills, AZ(2000ft. elevation). I decided to run it, but not to press too hard because I wanted to train in the mountains later. I went out easy and immediately noticed a difference in altitude. It actually felt like I was running on air.

Three people ran out very fast. I decided to let them go. A few people ran with me for a while, would try to pass and then sink back. In what seemed like only a few minutes I passed a chalked number 3 on the road. I thought, oh that must be 3K, but looking at my watch it said 16:40. So, I knew it must be 3 miles. At this point I had pulled away from the chase pack and was closing in on 3rd place. I passed 3rd place at the 1st water stop, and small hills began at this point. 5 mile at 27:40. I couldn’t believe how easy this felt! 6 mile at 33:25. The second and first place runners disappeared in the distance. Then there was the famous “long sustained” hill which all the runners had talked about being excruciating. It was rather lame to Colorado standards. Later I found out that the chase pack had expected to catch me on the “big” hill, but that was not to be. Didn’t they know that I train with the Incline Club?

The last couple miles seemed long as I was expecting the end to come. Finish was 52:46. I think this was the only race in years that I actually felt energetic after the race. Even felt good enough to drive to the mountains to run 12 miles (2000ft. elevation gain) near Payess, AZ. Couldn’t let a weekend go by without running up a mountain.

With the exception of snowshoe races I haven’t done a 5K, 10K, or 15K since I was 18, wo I PRd them all in this race. The 5 mile was also a PR. Much fun was had!

Things Done Right:
Didn’t go out with the leaders.

Things Done Wrong:
Drank bear the night before. Stayed up late. Got up late, and missed the bus. Ran in my heavy training shoes. No warmup. Ran hard Wednesday and Thursday, and was still sore from those workouts. Mostly... everything, but I didn’t care too much. It was just a fun race. I wanted to see what it was like to run a race at low altitude.

Any Other Stuff:
The race was fairly well done, with the exception that they started the race 15 minutes early! Doing my business before the race, I almost missed the start.

The BIG QUESTION that all true Incliners must ask: “Do I get a R for an out of state 15K with a 12 mile mountain run thereafter?” ;)

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US National Snowshoe Championships - Traverse City, MI - February 16, 2002

Kelli Lusk reports:
Distance: 10k snowshoe
Goal: Finish in top-5
Results: 4th overall woman
Website: http://www.runningfit.com

General Summary:
The US National Snowshoe Championships were pretty cool. It was neat to see quite a few people come from all over the country to compete. Last year was the first year for the event, but 2002 was the first year you had to qualify in your region. I qualified at the Meadow Mountain 15k in January, then decided it would be fun to go and spend a few extra days with my family (Michigan is my home state). When I arrived on Friday afternoon, there looked to be very little snow and it was raining. Not good for a snowshoe race!! Actually, it turned out to be a surprisingly challenging course because it was rolling and relatively fast (well, my time wasn’t fast... but that’s beside the point). The course was different than a typical Colorado event... no powder descents, hikes on steep climbs or altitude! The woman who won the North-American Snowshoe Championships, the US Nationals Rockies regional qualifier and just about every race in Colorado this year won the US Nationals... which I pretty much expected... I was in a solid 2nd place position on the first lap (it was two 5k loops on the same course), when I got nasty sidestiches. I’ve had them twice before (the 12k at Penrose in 2000 and the Boulder Backroads Half in 2001). They basically force me to walk or stop. After I had tried running, stopping and slowing down, the eventual 2nd and 3rd place girls caught and passed me. I was recovering on the 2nd loop and was gaining quickly on the 3rd place girl. I finished about 10-15 seconds behind her. The results posted to the website are incorrect. My finish time was 49:31 (they have the 3rd place girl listed with that time).

Overall, the event was fun and will hopefully grow each year. Both the men’s and women’s winners were also the North-American Snowshoe Championship winners and both were from Colorado.

Things Done Right:
Adequate warmup. Dressed appropriately... it actually felt a little balmy than what’s the norm at most snowshoe events.

Things Done Wrong:
Damn sidestiches! Probably needed to relax and focus more.

Any Other Stuff:
Course: 10k, VASA trail, Traverse City, MI
Type: rolling, hardpack, no powder. There wasn’t any trail to break because of lack of snow. A few sections of singletrack, but many opportunities to pass.
Aid Stations: one + pre-race water and energy drink
Registration: A confirmation letter was sent a few days before the event. The event cost was only $15! ($10 if you were a USSSA member). This included a race t-shirt and a packet of GU energy drink.
Start Time: The start time was changed from 9am to 9:30am a few days before the event. The event did start on-time once we lined up for the race.
Results/Timing: Well, they got my time wrong, but my place right...
Awards: I didn’t stick around because the awards were at 2pm a few miles from the racesite and we had a four-hour drive home. Apparently, the medals were engraved “showshoe race” instead of “snowshoe race.”

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Las Vegas Marathon - Las Vegas, NV - February 3, 2002

Jennie Pierce reports:
Las Vegas was my first marathon, and it was a good choice. The course was nice and flat with minimal up hills and a gradual decent (roughly 800ft. for 26 miles). The weather could not have been better on race day! It was in the 30’s at the start and topped out in the low 60’s for the finish. It was not the most scenic of runs, but at the time I could have cared less. I was pretty focused. For a first marathon I think I did a lot of things right, and maybe could have done some things differently.

Done Correctly:
* Trained about 70 miles per week with speed, tempo runs, and a long run each week. The rest of the days I just put in the miles. I tried to get a few long runs on flat pavement.

* I had great motivation from my husband Brett. He met me at the half way mark, at the 20 mile mark, and right before the finish line. I could not have done it without him.

* The usual pre race activities: hydration, good food, and rest. I also took three gels along with me for energy. I took one at mile 6, mile 12, and mile 18.

What I Would Have Done Differently:
* Done a couple more long runs on the road and reaching over three hours. I hit a wall at mile 23.

* I would have taken one more gel with me, and that might have saved the last three miles for me.

All in all, I had a great time and loved every minute of it, even the pain!

164 JENNIE PIERCE   MANITOU SPRINGS CO  29  F 18 DIV 2  1:31:12  3:06:50

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San Diego Marathon - Carlsbad, CA - January 20, 2002

Gordon Barnett reports:
Elevation: 93 (highest point at mile 12: 150 feet above sea level)
Temp: 50 (start) 65 (finish) Clear skies with minimal sea breezes.
Goal: 3:25:00 to qualify for Boston. Run negative splits.
Actual: 3:25:30
Overall M: 132
Age Group: 45-49/16
Pace: 7:50
Splits: 0:45:11 (10k) 1:37:32 (Half) 2:29:30 (19.6)

Overstating the obvious: It was close.

Felt really good and relaxed at the start, the first mile was a gentle uphill then generally flattened out with a long gradual hill at mile 12. The marathon course was an out and back following the coast highway and running parallel to the ocean. Very picturesque. Settled into a good sustainable pace and ran a 3:15 pace through the first half, with the exception of Mile 1, I hydrated (1-2 cups H2O) at each water station which were at every mile point along the course. I had dissolved a gu into a water bottle which was gone at the gun. Great group of volunteers manning all the stations, with a variety of local musical bands throughout. The spectator support seemed little or non existent, I guess given the location people had other stuff to do on a Sunday morning.

Through the first half I felt strong, and confident with my pace. At mile 15 I felt my left quad tightening slightly, not familiar with this sensation I slowed my pace a bit and tried to run through it. I made sure to keep drinking at the water stations, staying away from the concentrated Gatorade and going with H2O. By Mile 20 both Quads — and now my left calve — were growing increasingly tighter and painful. I usually slow or even quick-walk the water stations, but I ran through the final ones grabbing H2O, drinking what I could, afraid to stop because I wasn’t sure I’d be able to turn my legs over again. The final 5 miles were the hardest I’ve run in recent memory. I tried following the club mantra, “...when it hurts, speed up!" This only worked in short spurts, and could see that I was slowing with each mile. The uphills eased the pain in my legs, but increased with every downhill, the thought of the finish line didn’t help — knowing the final mile was downhill. I finished giving it all I could, and even managed slight sprint at the finish line.

Hobbling through the finish area, my thoughts were to find Carole (best support crew — ever) and the massage tent. Met Carole at the designated meeting point and started our way (slowly) to the massage tent. I felt a hand take my arm, which turned out be a girl from the medical tent. She immediately turned me around and escorted (supported) me into the medial area. Several ice packs and several welcome — although painful — leg massages later, I began to feel better — all the while being force-fed liquids. As I lay there, I had visions of Matt after the PPM with intravenous needles sticking out of both arms.

Overall I was pleased with my results, a marathon PR by over 7 minutes even with seizing up over the second half. Looking back I think I may have gone out too fast, but after usually kicking myself for not going harder I wanted to give it my all. I did.

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Breckenridge Snowshoe 10K - Breckenridge , CO - January 20, 2002

Jonathan Veteto reports:
The trek to ten-mile was my first attempt at a snowshoe race. There was a 5 and 10k, I did the 10. The course started with on a downhill and thus, finished going up. The 10k was 2 loops, the second I thought was lots easier than the first, as a lot of snow had been packed down. After the first couple hundred yards, the course narrowed to single track through the woods south of peak 10. Lots of snow, if you got outside the ‘track’ it was entirely possible to end up to your waist in snow. Passing on the sides was an sketchy prospect at best. The start elevation was 10,232 we were told, and I couldn’t say where we went from there. Up and down. Temp was about 4 or 5 degrees when leaving the car, but sun did bless us with a smile eventually. After the race, the ski area actually provided a breakfast brunch type thing with free juice and such. When was the last time *anyone* got anything free at a ski area ? Pretty cool. Lots of fun people were there, and it was a really friendly environment.

It was hard to pass anyone on such a narrow course, at times it seemed that there was 24” of snow on either side of the track. But it was magnificent to run through the woods in the snow. Had a blast. Lots of up and down, I think the hilly runs are paying off. The uphill finish was a good thing. I think progress could have done much better had I been experienced in what to expect. Oh well, no Jedi am I on the snowshoes right now. Next time. Finished in around 57 minutes, didn’t check exactly. Ran into several people I had meet on the Colorado relay, but didn’t see anyone from home there.

The company who puts on the race is great adventure sports. They also sponsor the imperial challenge winter tri and the hell in the high country bike race. Done several of their events and would recommend anything they put on. Great people and a lot of fun.

Hope you guys were warmer than I was.

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World Golf Village Half Marathon - St. Augustine, FL - January 12, 2002

Brian Eldgrige reports:
This was my first 1/2 marathon and what better place to do it then at sea level on a course that had virtually no elevation gain. The race was point to point starting at the courthouse in St. Augustine and finishing at the World Golf Village. The course itself was extremely boring. The only change in elevation was the result of an overpass going over I-95. The weather was pretty nice though. By race start at 8:00 am it was in the mid 60’s and partly cloudy. My goal before the race was to run faster than 1:30. I’ve been training to run a marathon in April so I wanted to use this race to test my fitness. My main objective was to try to run as comfortable as possible and try to work on pacing. I always have a tendency to follow faster runners and go way to fast the first few miles. Probably comes from my cycling background where getting dropped is a bad thing. True to form the gun went off and I found myself trying to keep pace with a small group that went through miles 1 and 2 at a 6’ mile pace. I spent the next mile trying to convince myself I could hold this pace for the next 11 miles but then I came to my senses and dropped back to about a 6’ 15” mile pace for the next several miles. After about mile seven or so I decided to forget about the pacing and rather concentrate on my form. Before I knew it the finish line was in sight. Amazing how short 13.1 miles feels after doing 2.5-3 hours on Sundays. I finished in 1:24:28. It was good enough for 10th overall out of 192 and second in my age group. There’s no doubt that the Sunday long runs have given me a lot of strength and endurance. I was amazed at how the miles flew by and how good I felt at the finish.

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Tucson Marathon - Tucson, AZ - Sunday, December 9, 2001

Tamara Rogers reports:
Elevation: Start - 4700' approx. Finish - 2700' approx.
Goal: 3:25
Time: 3:23:20 (PR by 13:34!!)
Place: 40th O/A woman (530 total), 14th 35-39 - my NEW age group (109 total), 290th O/A men & women (1600 total)
Splits: 10K 0:45:40 1/2Mara. 1:38:51 31K 2:27:50
Tucson is a relatively small marathon — acclaimed for its fast course. Unfortunately, this year we all had to deal with the extremely high winds — with gusts of 20-40 MPH- but I think they were more consistently around 10-15 MPH. It’s a point-to-point course so the wind can be a big factor. It was coming from the front but at least it was a cross wind and not a full head on wind — that would have been even more brutal for sure. The course has a pretty significant drop in elevation in the first two miles. I had no idea how fast I was running since I missed the first mile mark and my heart rate monitor for some reason was not reading correctly. I got to the 2 mile mark in 14:09. I was shooting for 7:50 pace so I made a concerted effort to hold back since my failure in the other 3 marathons that I’ve run has been going out too fast and bonking the last 10K. My heart rate monitor finally kicked in and I just focused on keeping my heart rate in a range that I knew would get me to the finis h conservatively. My ultimate goal was to be passing people and finishing strong the last 10K. At the half, I had PR’d my 1/2 marathon time by 2 minutes and still felt great. The course at this point is rolling but still mostly downhill. I made sure that I ate my gels, and alternated between water and Ultima at every aid station (about every 2 miles). I got to 20 miles and still felt strong — a new feeling for me. I was ahead of my goal time by over 5 minutes but I was a little afraid that I might still bonk. The course ends with a pretty significant uphill for .4 mile right before the finish and I wanted to crank it up that hill so I held back a little. I passed 104 people in the last half of the race, 64 of them in the last 7 miles — and better yet - only 2 passed me (usually they’re flying past me like I’m going 10 mph on I-25). I was so thrilled - finally a strong finish and in at 3:23:20!

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Honolulu Marathon - Honolulu, HI - December 9, 2001

Elizabeth Ahola reports:
Entrants: 23,513
Starters: 19,415
Finishers: 19,236
Start Time: 5AM with fire works
Timing Device: chip

Course Description:
All pavement with 2 hills (~200 ft. climb in ¼ — ½ mile stretch) with moderate descents. The first hill is around mile 7 and the last is around mile 24.5. Pass by the zoo and smell those elephants. Because the race starts at 5am and sunrise isn’t till 6:45am, you miss a lot of the scenery.

Things Done Right:
Flew in the day before the race so that the 5am race with a wake up of 2am felt like a wake up of 5am. Also flying forced me to rest and not walk around. Packed what I was going to eat the day before and the morning of the race so that I didn’t have to rely on airplane food and finding restaurants. Took that and all race gear with me as carry-on in case suitcase was lost.

Took the bus to get the race packet and went back to hotel room. Went to bed early. Got lots of fluids.

Drank at all water stations (2-3 miles apart), except towards the end when it seemed they were appearing sooner. Hallucinating or they were every mile or so. Walked through water stops. Maintained running form when tired. Stayed away from the sports drink they were offering and just took in water. Took gels/powder stuff every 45 minutes or so.

Forced myself not to sit down for ~20 minutes after the race and started to replenish food sources. Got a free post-race massage at finish line.

Things Done Wrong:
You’ve got to love this section. I would say not BARS any more. I packed powder drink stuff, gels, and threw a bar in. Should have stuck to the gels. Trying to eat some of the bar at 23 miles required that I walk a bit more and made it harder to get going again. And then there’s this thing about not training and pacing and ..

General:
Transportation was offered from the finish line to the starting line the morning of the race. The last bus was to leave at 4am. I got up at 2am (had to with the noise some people were making in the hallways) and grabbed my breakfast and went to the finishing line in the park to catch the bus to the starting line. Once at the starting line it was twiddle your fingers. It started to rain at 4:15am and most people froze. I met a 7K-runner lady in a bush while taking cover from the rain and she had never run more than 7 miles but wanted to run the marathon as bandit. We hooked up. The pre-race material they had in our race packets said that they where going to remove the Starting Line timing chip pads at 5:20am so I suggested we move up a bit to ensure I pass before 5:20am (timing chip attached to shoes) and allow people to pass us. We started at the 2-3hr slot.

Frozen and unable to stretch (packed like sardines), the fireworks went off and the race started. Everyone was more interested at looking at the fireworks than running, but we soon got going.

Before I continue — disclaimer — this was my first marathon and 2nd race (2001 Ascent was 1st). I started running last March 2000 for the Ascent - so I’m a newbie.

For me I ran the 1st half of the race in dark. You had to avoid puddles that you couldn’t see and trash bags that people discarded once the rain stopped. Some people tripped and feel. So there were bodies too. The lady I was running with got her feet soaked and made them feel pretty heavy. Me — I couldn’t tell.

After posting a ? on the Incline Forum, I set my heart monitor to 75% and was going to take Matt’s advice, don’t go out fast. Did you notice the WAS. It started beeping from the get go and I ignored it with reasoning that it was the adrenaline. After about an hour, I turned off the beeping.

The first hill around 7 miles was a breeze. It’s that attack attitude you get when running around the Peak. I left my running partner at 13 miles while she attended the ‘Port-a-Potty’. Because she had a sore foot, I actually think she helped me in not going out faster. We were running 11-minute miles at the beginning.

I was preparing for the crash point (20miles) that I read about in other people’s accounts and hit 18 miles feeling good. 20 miles came and felt good. 3 to go and I’m dead. Never during the race did I get winded, it was the lack of muscle/endurance that did me in. My legs REALLY started to get stiff and hurt and I’m thinking I need to start doing squats again.

I broke down and tried eating my energy bar when I just needed 1 more gel. Maybe even some Advil would have been nice. Anyway the bar, it forced me to walk a bit further while trying to chew it. It was hard to get going again. Now I’m picking off runners and concentrating on moving. Don’t STOP. 1/2 the way up the 24.5 mile marker hill, I looked at my watch because it was an energy effort to go up it. YIKES new Max HR. by 2 points. So I walked up the rest of that hill. I should of set my HR monitor to capture a new max. The down hill portion was comforting in some odd way. Oh how I wanted to walk to the finish line, but I ran on and on and crossed the LINE.

During the entire race I was realizing that I liked the ups and downs because that is what I’m use to. My legs didn’t like the flatlander stuff. Mentally I think running the hills make you tough and I capped that toughness a LOT.

Training program before race:
I signed up for the race 6 weeks before start date and tried to build back a base after taking the late summer/fall off after the Ascent. I did no speed or track work. My long run/walk workouts were averaging 3-3.5 hours and 13 miles or so. I was averaging 30-35 miles a week.

Finish Time:
4 hrs 38 minutes averaging 10.5 minute miles (I believe). Ready for this. My average HR was 158. Taking into account my new Max HR. That would put me at 90% average effort.


Daniel Adams reports:
Distance: 26.2 miles
Goal: 4 hours (actually, finish in one piece & run the whole thing)
Results: 5 hrs 24 min (finished in one piece & ran the whole thing ssslllooowww)
Website: http://www.honolulumarathon.org

General Summary:
Well I should probably submit this before too many months go by.
I was in Hawaii on active duty with the Navy for two weeks & was only running about once a week beforehand. I heard about the race a few days before & signed up. But, having the desire to feel pain I went for it. Actually, I could do without the pain but it was a great race & quite scenic I might add, beautiful place.

Things Done Right:
Woke up at 2:45AM to run off base & catch the bus at 3:30AM to go downtown for the race start at 5:00AM. Actually took my time in the race since I hadn’t prepared for it. This was the 4th marathon I’ve run (3 in 2001 & 1 in 200) the first time to run the whole thing only stopping to drink liquid then get rid of it. The first long race that I felt not half dead after, with actually enough remaining energy to walk around Waikiki the rest of the day. Also wasn’t feeling too bad the days after.

Things Done Wrong:
Didn’t stay long enough. They made me come home after my two weeks was up. Stayed on base at Pearl Harbor because I had to. It would have been better in a nice hotel off of Waikiki Beach.

Any Other Stuff:
I know you all feel sorry for me having to go to Hawaii for two weeks but it’s a tough job and somebody has to do it & it might as well be me. By the way, the beaches were great and the water was warm. There were a number of different people running in costumes, a couple of Japanese santa clauses, some natives in traditional garb, one marine with a full back pack, one marine carrying a huge flag through the whole race, one Japanese guy ran the whole race in traditional Japanese garb including wooden shoes, three Japanese guys in sumo wrestling type outfits & some other odd stuff.
I heard people talking about a dreaded hill before the race, well it was nothing & didn’t compare to the hills & mountains we run out here.
I do have to say I was glad it was cloudy, even with the clouds I started to heat up, it got a little too warm at times. But all in all it turned out really well.

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Rock Canyon 1/2 Marathon - Pueblo, CO - December 2, 2001

Complete Race Results

Paul Sullivan reports:
This was, I believe, the 3rd time I ran this race. A record 187 finishers! ICer Jennie Pierce was 2nd female with 1:30:42!! Paul Koch 1st overall in 1:16:03. I was happy with my 8th place finish 1:23:55 (smoked you Neal,... finally) and 1st in age group, having just turned the old-man (Larry) age of 35. Good showing by the IC:

  8 Paul Sullivan  35  1  M 35-39  1:23:55.3   6:24/M
  9 Neal Oseland   32  3  M 30-34  1:24:32.9   6:27/M
 19 Larry Miller   51  2  M 50-54  1:29:31.5   6:50/M
 23 Jennie Pierce  29  1  F 25-29  1:30:42.7   6:55/M
 26 Gordon Neal    45  6  M 45-49  1:34:18.5   7:12/M
 39 Bryan Willis   41  6  M 40-44  1:38:51.3   7:33/M
117 Kim Kitchen    43  8  F 40-44  1:58:58.1   9:05/M
119 Rick Pearcy    48 26  M 45-49  1:59:35.5   9:08/M
151 Laura Enleman  48  9  F 45-49  2:09:58.5   9:55/M
181 Dave Sorenson  47 34  M 45-49  2:35:37.4  11:53/M

For the 2nd year, due to trail maintenance, apparently, the course ran east on paved trail from City Park (Zoo) along the Arkansas River to the new River Walk in Downtown Pueblo -- and back. Unfortunately, because of this, it was less scenic than in years past. (Unless you like looking at Pueblo’s bygone industrial era. Given the Arkansas is almost entirely concreted over for several miles leading into downtown, the race’s name, “Rock Canyon,” is rather ironic. Number of overturned, wayward shopping carts along route: 4) Hopefully, the race will be back to its westward route toward the reservoir next year. Otherwise, this is a fun, well organized event!

Race tip: Carried a gel(K-boom) with me and downed it and 2 cups of water as I walked leisurely through the aid station at the 7 mile turn-around point. Lost several seconds that I easily made back up in the second half of the race (passing a particular person. ;-)).


Larry Miller reports:
Well, that was #14. I’ve run 14 of the 15 Rock Canyon Half Marathons. This one was an eye opener for me. I didn’t get ready for it like I usually do by running on concrete and asphalt surfaces and the course did a number on my legs. This was the second year in a row that the Rock Canyon 1/2 didn’t go to Rock Canyon and was run to the water-walk which is near downtown Pueblo with a lot of concrete surface’s. I did the first four miles to see where I stood as far my time during my tempo runs and found that the last 9 miles was the same pace? So the tempo runs I’ve been doing have been working, but are just too slow. Well, now I know were I stand and how and I can work on improving myself for the next race. My time 51 years, one day. My race time one hour and 29+


Kim Kitchen and Rick Pearcy report:
Pueblo’s 1/2 marathon was held today (Dec. 2). The race started at City Park and then ran its way into the city on the path by the river. The weather was good- sunny, a little breeze, and cool. The race was on pavement and/or asphalt. (And boy, can I tell the difference on my legs from the trails that we’ve been running!) The flat, flat, course included some interesting graffiti down along the river, and a beautiful section in Pueblo’s downtown area near the turn around. The best part of the race was the sweatshirt (instead of a t-shirt). We saw lots of other ICers and as usual, they were all awesome.


Jennie Pierce reports:
I ended up taking second place female with a time of 1:30:33. I was pretty happy with my time considering it was my first road half marathon. I don’t know if you can compare the Accent??? Anyway, there was some other incliners down there including: Paul S., Neil O., Larry M., and Craig ???? ( I can’t remember his last name). The trail was different this year due to construction. Larry said it had more hills in it this time, but in certainly wasn’t like we normally run.


Dave Sorenson reports:
Course: Out-and-back along the Pueblo River Trail (i.e., along the Arkansas River). The start/finish is at Pueblo City Park and the turn around is the Pueblo Riverwalk.

Weather: Very comfortable, starting temperature about 40 degrees, rising to around 50 degrees a couple of hours later. Thin layer of high clouds, protecting runners from direct sunlight.

Ugh, I’m really out of shape. I definitely did too much “off” during the off season. My race today was much like the Broncos played in Miami today. Nothing spectacular happened during the first 3/4 of the race, but I was slow and steady. I just needed to keep it up and finish comfortably. But just like the Broncos, I fell apart in the 4th quarter and really struggled to finish. However, unlike the Broncos, I don’t have to turn things around immediately. There are still more than 8 months left before the 3rd weekend in August. I’ll just have to plan on slow and gradual progress, and stay away from those interceptions and fumbles on kickoff returns.


Neal Oseland reports:
What a great day for running! Not too hot, not too cold and minimal wind. The lack of long runs showed itself in full force. I have only run over 1 hour twice in the last 2 months and it bit me big time. I came through the 10 mile mark around 1:03 and feeling good. I crashed almost immediately and was barely able to run sub 7 min miles during the last 5k. I ended up finishing 1:24:32 in 9th place which was over a 4 minute PR for me but I had hoped to do better. That should be a relatively easy fix-just get the long runs under my belt.


Gordon Neal reports:
I was pleased with my time considering I have been overtraining since October. I thought it was a nice sized race and a nice course even if it was paved and flat. The weather was pretty ideal for running although I expected it to be colder. I am looking forward to running Waldo this Sunday. Although I have been doing lots of running and racing for the last three months I have done very little on the trails. I’ll be joining Keith G’s group so I guess I’ll be starting early most days but I still expect to see plenty of everyone.


Bryan Willis reports:
I participated in the Rock Canyon Half Marathon. The race started out in the park next to the Pueblo Zoo, it went downhill from the park along the Arkansas river bottom, it eventually made it’s way along a newly built trail that followed the river. This area was really nice, however I have to admit that I love running on trails and mountain terrain much more than running this particular race. The race was fun but seemed boring because of it’s flatness. Although I most likely won’t participate in this race next year I am happy that I got the opportunity to experience this event.

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Seattle Marathon - Seattle, WA - November 25, 2001

Steve Mischel reports:
This was my first marathon so I had no idea what to expect except that the half way mark is at mile 20, so true. My goal was to complete it since I had to get a cortisone shot in my foot the week prior just to walk normally. The podiatrist said I had a bruised nerve in the ball of my foot. The shot helped, I finished in 3 hrs, 42 min.

The course began/ended near the Space Needle, most of the run followed the shores of Lake Washington. The weather was not surprisingly cold with rain/drizzle throughout most of the morning. According to the literature it was a moderately hilly marathon which I was happy to hear since most of my training contains hills. I later discovered that the max elevation gain was 150' at mile 20 where I passed a handful of marathoners. At mile 23 is where the real pain started as my legs began to cramp but I could see the finish line at Memorial Stadium near the Space N. which was enough incentive to continue running. It was a great event with plenty of oxygen!


Scott Lincoln reports:
8:15 AM Start. 40 degrees start — 39 degrees finish
RAIN all day

When I say my lower back is day-to-day, I mean it. I signed up at 3:00 at the Expo on Saturday. I asked about refunds. The rest of the day I drank lots of water, tried to get off my feet and had pasta for dinner. Truthfully, I had NO IDEA what to expect for Sunday when I hit the pillow that night. I lay awake ... sleepless in Seattle. (eeewww, sorry ;)

My friend dropped me off 1/2 hour before the start, and I (warmed up) in the chilly drizzle. Shoes wet at start. My plan was okay I had no plan. But I had a mantra: “Relax and run steady.” Uphill start. Decided to keep my eye on the HR monitor. (anyone wishing to discuss HR adjustment from altitude to sea-level please email; I have thoughts but no science.) Mile 1 in 6:40. Okay ... remember to breathe. Settled in and clicked off sub-7:00’s for a while. Had at least a gulp of Ultima at each station. Got in with some pacers. GU at Mile 7. Starting to feel the throb. Split of 1:28:48 at halfway. GU at mile 18. Still sub 7:00 pace.

Mile 20, hurting but still focused and pleasantly surprised. At this point I’m thinking ... SUB 3:00:00? Whathehe#*! This is SOOO COOL! Then a guy in my age group pulls up beside me and says “Looking good .... here come the hills.” He starts to pull away. The course takes a 90 degree left from flat to Seattle’s version of Hydro Street. It was almost eerie. I remembered the day Matt and I raced each other on Hydro for the last six or seven repeats. (Side note: I won’t say who took who on those repeats but let’s just say there was a comment made by ONE of us suggesting that the OTHER must have held back on the minute-on/minute-offs because it just didn’t make sense how the ONE could so handily outsprint the other.) Anyway, as this guy pulled on leaden boots I smiled my way up the hill. Same on the next long hill; very Ruxtonesque. I said “on your left” more than once. At mile 21 & 3/4 my Seattle buddy had his state-of-the-art digital whizcam set-up under an umbrella — the course went (literally) right beside his house — and he got some fantastic footage of the back of his state-of-the-art lens cap.

Okay — the big finish. Well, it wasn’t big. It was just steady. I passed a few more who were bonked or bonking, and handed one a GU. The hill guy never caught me. The hills had slowed my pace for a mile or so, and try as I did, I watched 3 hours tick by with marker 26 in sight. Still, I gotta say, my finish made me smile. I would have jumped for joy ... but, well, ... my back, ... you know. No jumping. Wrapped in mylar, completely waterlogged, I ate my free PowerBar and tried to take it all in.

The events of the last year have made me acutely aware of how much living a fit lifestyle and being a runner means to me. Enough to find a way to make it happen. I would not be the runner I am today without the encouragement, support and pushing of my fellow IC’ers. Good on all of ya. Back permitting, I’m looking forward to rejoining my club soon.

Click here: www.seattlemarathon.org

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Run to the Farside - San Francisco, CA - November 25, 2001

Gordon Barnett reports:
Weather: 45 degrees at the start with scattered rain showers, humidity 85%.
Distance: 10k
Elevation: 110'

158 Gordon Barnett Colo Spgs, CO 47 M 40-49 42:52.0 6:54/M

This was the 17th annual Run to the Farside 5k and 10k race held every Thanksgiving weekend to help support the California Academy of Sciences. Entry fee includes ‘free’ admission into the Academy, $100,000 was raised. This is a pretty cool race, as the long sleeved t-shirt and poster (which all runners) receive is designed by Gary Larson who draws the Farside cartoon. There’s also a “best costume” category, so there lots of crazy costumes based on Larson characters. Throw in a number elite runners from the area and it made for a rather eclectic adventure. News reports had the total number of runners for both events at 10,000. It was a cool and wet day, but my IC singlet, shorts and gloves were enough. Note: No other IC shirts spotted in the sea of runners.

Both races started together at 8:30 a.m. on a main road just outside Golden Gate park. At the ‘gun’ everyone was off, and although it was requested that runners line up according to their pace times this just wasn’t the case - resulting in a very slow first 1/2 mile. After clearing the congestion at the start, the field spread out allowing me to set a comfortable pace. The course first ran straight out of the park onto a neighboring city avenue on a slight downhill, at about 1.5 miles the course changed directions, turning up one street then back into the park on a parallel avenue now a slight uphill. Coming back into the park the 5k runners split off left and the 10k turned right up into the hills of Golden Gate Park. This is an amazing park, very green and lush with the scent of cedar everywhere. San Francisco experienced very high winds and rain the day before so there was lots of debris on the asphalt-paved trails. During the race the rolling hills take you past bronze sculptures, a Japanese tea house, and beautiful gardens. Unfortunately I didn’t see any split times, and no mile markers (until mile 5). The course had one water station.

I wanted a concentrated effort to run a good pace, felt strong throughout - passing a number of runners in the uphill sections. The final 4 miles are all on trails within the park, with the finish line in front of the Academy of Sciences building. Lots of tents and booths with (good and bad) information and free stuff. A R&B band played in the band shell. Overall I was pretty pleased with my results, this was a PR for me beating my time at the Grand Prix Classic this past summer by over 2 minutes. And from what I could tell on the results page, I was the top finisher — from Colorado =:)

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